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Antibiotic Food Interactions

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1. Antibiotic Food Interactions

Antibiotic Food Interactions Antibiotic Food Interactions Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Antibiotic Food Interactions (...) Antibiotic Food Interactions Aka: Antibiotic Food Interactions From Related Chapters II. Preparations: Antibiotics to take with food Food may reduce gastrointestinal upset Ethionamide ( ) Methenamine ( ) Niclosamide Praziquantel Pyrimethamine Quinacrine (with food and full glass of water) Quinine Rifabutin (may require supplement) Thiabendazole Food increases absorption or bioavailability ( ) ( ) ( ) Clofazimine (take with fatty meal) ( ) Mebendazole (Chew or crush tablet) (with food and a full glass

2018 FP Notebook

2. Antibiotic Use for the Urgent Management of Dental Pain and Intra-oral Swelling Clinical Practice Guideline Full Text available with Trip Pro

provider if their infection worsens while receiving therapy. Similarly, clindamycin has a US Food and Drug Administration black box warning for Clostridioides difficile infection, which can be fatal. x 26 US Food and Drug Administration. CLEOCIN HCl. Available at: . Accessed October 4, 2019. Patients should be instructed to call their primary care provider if they develop fever, abdominal cramping, or ≥ 3 loose bowel movements/d. If the patient currently is taking an antibiotic within the same spectrum (...) , and clindamycin substantially increases the risk of developing Clostridioides difficile infection even after a single dose. Owing to concerns about antibiotic resistance, patients who receive azithromycin should be instructed to closely monitor their symptoms and call a dentist or primary care provider if their infection worsens while on therapy. Similarly, clindamycin has a US Food and Drug Administration black box warning for Clostridioides difficile infection, which can be fatal. x 26 US Food and Drug

2020 American Dental Association Guidelines

3. Antibacterial-coated sutures versus non-antibacterial-coated sutures for the prevention of abdominal, superficial and deep, surgical site infection (SSI)

low risk of bias RCTs 83 Table 19: The length of hospital stay in triclosan-coated vs non-antibacterial coated sutures patient groups 85 Table 20: The proportion of patients requiring secondary surgery for wound-related complications of surgery 86 Table 21: The incidence of complete abdominal wound dehiscence within 30 days of surgery and incisional hernia during the period of study follow-up 87 Table 22: Causative microorganism of SSI and the use of systemic antibiotic therapy within 30 days (...) Controlled Trial REA Relative Effectiveness Assessment RoB Risk of Bias RR Relative risk SAE Serious Adverse Event SAF Safety domain Antibacterial-coated sutures for the prevention of abdominal SSI Version 1.4, March 2017 EUnetHTA Joint Action 3 WP4 10 SAP Surgical antibiotic prophylaxis SDGC Study Center of the German Surgical Society SHEA The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America SHEA/IDSA Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America/Infectious Diseases Society of America SI Superficial

2017 EUnetHTA

4. Is the use of chlorhexidine contributing to increased resistance to chlorhexidine and/or antibiotics?

’ defined by using the clinical breakpoints for resistance as specified by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility testing (EUCAST) or the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CSLI). 2. Increase in the incidence (rate) of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria established through the use of chlorhexidine identifying dosage form, exposure and specific population and / or setting. Antibiotic-resistant strain of bacteria through the use of chlorhexidine to be recorded. 3. Increases (...) to chlorhexidine in a specific population and / or setting. To address the question ‘Does exposure (different dosages, duration of use, and stratification of exposure) to any form of chlorhexidine increases the incidence and/or prevalence of antibiotic- resistant strains of bacteria in any person within different healthcare settings? ’ the outcomes included: ? ‘Resistance against antibiotics’ defined by using the clinical breakpoints for resistance as specified by the European Committee on Antimicrobial

2018 National Health and Medical Research Council

5. Proposals for a more effective antibiotic policy in Belgium

(BAPCOC) 24 1.1.6 Difficult to obtain significant improvements 24 1.2 RESEARCH QUESTIONS & SCOPE 25 1.3 TERMINOLOGY 25 1.4 METHODOLOGY 26 1.5 STRUCTURE OF THE REPORT 26 2 ANTIBIOTIC USE AND ITS LINK WITH ANTIBACTERIAL RESISTANCE 27 2.1 WHAT IS ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE? 27 2.1.1 Antibacterial resistance, a natural phenomenon 27 2.1.2 How do bacteria become resistant? 27 2.1.3 How does antibiotic resistance spread? 28 2.1.4 Multidrug resistant organisms 28 2.1.1 Resistance in community and healthcare (...) in nursing homes in Belgium and the EU/EEA, 2016-2017 ECDC PPS 79 Table 10 – Use of antibiotics (ATC group J01) in nursing homes in 2016-2017 80 Table 11 – Ways of obtaining antibiotics in Belgium and the 28 EU member states in 2016 81 Table 12 – Reasons for taking antibiotics in Belgium and the 28 EU member states in 2016 81 Table 13 – Overall knowledge about antibiotics in Belgium and the 28 EU member states in 2016 82 Table 14 – Sales of the various antimicrobial classes for food-producing animals

2019 Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre

6. HTA of C-reactive protein point-of-care testing to guide antibiotic prescribing

a range of health services, in conjunction with the Department of Health and the HSE. Health Technology Assessment (HTA) of CRP POCT Health Information and Quality Authority iv Foreword Antimicrobial resistance occurs when bacteria adapt in response to the use of medicines. When bacteria become antibiotic resistant, infections become more difficult to manage and treat. Antimicrobial resistance is a significant threat to public health, and widely acknowledged to be associated with the excessive (...) , but not for those with acute bronchitis. ? Overprescribing of antibiotics for RTIs in primary care is common in most industrialised countries, with high levels of inappropriate prescribing documented. Antibiotic treatment of RTIs can expose patients to an increased risk of an adverse event, with one out of five patients experiencing mostly minor and self-limiting adverse events. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a growing and significant threat to public health, and it is widely recognised that antibiotic

2019 Health Information and Quality Authority

7. Influence of Food Characteristics and Food Additives on the Antimicrobial Effect of Garlic and Oregano Essential Oils Full Text available with Trip Pro

Influence of Food Characteristics and Food Additives on the Antimicrobial Effect of Garlic and Oregano Essential Oils Utilization of essential oils (EOs) as antimicrobial agents against foodborne disease has gained importance, for their use as natural preservatives. Since potential interactions between EOs and food characteristics may affect their antimicrobial properties, the present work studies the influence of fat, protein, pH, aw and food additives on the antimicrobial effect of oregano (...) and garlic EOs against Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes. Results showed that protein, pH, aw, presence of beef extract, sodium lactate and nitrates did not influence their antimicrobial effect. In contrast, the presence of pork fat had a negative effect against both EOs associated with their dilution of the lipid content. The addition of food phosphates also exerts a negative effect against EOs probably associated with their emulsification properties as observed with the addition of fat

2017 Foods

8. Friend, foe or food? Recognition and the role of antimicrobial peptides in gut immunity and Drosophila–microbe interactions Full Text available with Trip Pro

Friend, foe or food? Recognition and the role of antimicrobial peptides in gut immunity and Drosophila–microbe interactions Drosophila melanogaster lives, breeds and feeds on fermenting fruit, an environment that supports a high density, and often a diversity, of microorganisms. This association with such dense microbe-rich environments has been proposed as a reason that D. melanogaster evolved a diverse and potent antimicrobial peptide (AMP) response to microorganisms, especially to combat (...) potential pathogens that might occupy this niche. Yet, like most animals, D. melanogaster also lives in close association with the beneficial microbes that comprise its microbiota, or microbiome, and recent studies have shown that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the epithelial immune response play an important role in dictating these interactions and controlling the host response to gut microbiota. Moreover, D. melanogaster also eats microbes for food, consuming fermentative microbes of decaying plant

2016 Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

9. Antimicrobial stewardship: Systems and processes for effective antimicrobial medicine use within human health and healthcare in New Zealand

interventions, for example, draining the site of infection. 1.1.34 When a decision to prescribe an antimicrobial has been made, take into account the benefits and harms for an individual patient associated with the particular antimicrobial, including: • possible interactions with other medicines or any food and drink • the patient’s other illnesses, for example, the need for dose adjustment in a patient with renal impairment • any drug allergies [? ?www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg183] (these should (...) and Contextualisation Group (GRCG) for each guideline. The GRCG will carefully consider the NICE guideline recommendations, taking into account the differences between the UK and New Zealand health care systems to produce a guideline that is relevant to those delivering and managing care in New Zealand. The development of a profusion of antimicrobial medicines since the middle of the twentieth century has been one of the greatest advances of medical science. Antibiotic therapy has reduced the mortality

2017 Best Practice Advocacy Centre New Zealand

10. Antimicrobial stewardship: systems and processes for effective antimicrobial medicine use

of infection. 1.1.35 When a decision to prescribe an antimicrobial has been made, take into account the benefits and harms for an individual patient associated with the particular antimicrobial, including: possible interactions with other medicines or any food and drink the patient's other illnesses, for example, the need for dose adjustment in a patient with renal impairment any drug allergies (see the NICE guideline on drug allergy; these should be documented in the patient's record) the risk (...) (including antibiotics) in children, young people and adults. It aims to change prescribing practice to help slow the emergence of antimicrobial resistance and ensure that antimicrobials remain an effective treatment for infection. Who is it for? Health and social care practitioners Organisations commissioning, providing or supporting the provision of care People who are taking antimicrobials and their families and carers. Antimicrobial stewardship: systems and processes for effective antimicrobial

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

11. The Selective Interaction of Pistacia lentiscus Oil vs. Human Streptococci, an Old Functional Food Revisited with New Tools Full Text available with Trip Pro

The Selective Interaction of Pistacia lentiscus Oil vs. Human Streptococci, an Old Functional Food Revisited with New Tools Pistacia lentiscus berry oil (LBO) represents a typical vegetal product of the Mediterranean basin that has been formally used in traditional cuisine for 100s of years. In addition to its interesting alimentary properties, this product could represent an interesting candidate in the field of research on the study of new anti-infective agents. In fact, in Mediterranean (...) countries, lentisk oil still continues to be widely used in folk medicine for oral and skin affections, in particular, acute gingivitis, pediatric skin infections such as impetigo and foot plaques, and biofilm related infections often associated with Streptococcus spp. Following these observations, we have hypothesized a "lentisk oil-bacteria" interaction, placing particular emphasis on the different Streptococcal species involved in these oral and skin diseases. In accordance with this hypothesis

2017 Frontiers in microbiology

12. Drug-drug Interaction (DDI) With a P-gp Inhibitor, Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide OATP-inhibitor, Food Effect

Drug-drug Interaction (DDI) With a P-gp Inhibitor, Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide OATP-inhibitor, Food Effect Drug-drug Interaction (DDI) With a P-gp Inhibitor, Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide OATP-inhibitor, Food Effect - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number (...) of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Drug-drug Interaction (DDI) With a P-gp Inhibitor, Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide OATP-inhibitor, Food Effect The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03116893 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : April

2017 Clinical Trials

13. Study Assessing the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, Food Effect, and Drug-Drug Interactions of PTI-801 in Healthy Volunteers, and Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of PTI-801 in Subjects With Cystic Fibrosis

Study Assessing the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, Food Effect, and Drug-Drug Interactions of PTI-801 in Healthy Volunteers, and Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of PTI-801 in Subjects With Cystic Fibrosis Study Assessing the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, Food Effect, and Drug-Drug Interactions of PTI-801 in Healthy Volunteers, and Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of PTI-801 in Subjects With Cystic Fibrosis - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide (...) glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Study Assessing the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, Food Effect, and Drug-Drug Interactions of PTI-801 in Healthy Volunteers, and Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of PTI-801 in Subjects

2017 Clinical Trials

14. Small-Scale Food Animal Production and Antimicrobial Resistance: Mountain, Molehill, or Something in-between? Full Text available with Trip Pro

Small-Scale Food Animal Production and Antimicrobial Resistance: Mountain, Molehill, or Something in-between? Small-scale food animal production is widely practiced around the globe, yet it is often overlooked in terms of the environmental health risks. Evidence suggests that small-scale food animal producers often employ the use of antimicrobials to improve the survival and growth of their animals, and that this practice leads to the development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) that can (...) potentially spread to humans. The nature of human-animal interactions in small-scale food animal production systems, generally practiced in and around the home, likely augments spillover events of AMR into the community on a scale that is currently unrecognized and deserves greater attention. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP2116.

2017 Environmental health perspectives

15. Improvement of citral antimicrobial activity by incorporation into nanostructured lipid carriers: a potential application in food stuffs as a natural preservative Full Text available with Trip Pro

Improvement of citral antimicrobial activity by incorporation into nanostructured lipid carriers: a potential application in food stuffs as a natural preservative At the present time, utilization of essential oils in food preservation to prevent bacterial and fungal growth and improve shelf life and safety of the food products has notably gained increased interest. The aim of the present study was to improve the antimicrobial efficacy of citral as a natural preservative using nanostructured (...) lipid carriers (NLCs). Formulations of NLCs were characterized using particle size analysis and scanning electron microscopy methods. Possible citral-carrier interaction and citral encapsulation efficiency percent (EE%) were assessed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography techniques, respectively. Antimicrobial activity, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of citral-loaded NLCs were evaluated and compared

2017 Research in pharmaceutical sciences

16. Bacteriocin-Antimicrobial Synergy: A Medical and Food Perspective Full Text available with Trip Pro

antimicrobial spectra and/or result in a reduction in the concentration of an antibiotic required for effective treatments to the extent that potentially toxic or adverse side effects can be reduced or eliminated. Here, we review studies in which bacteriocins were found to be effective in combination with other antimicrobials, with a view to targeting clinical and/or food-borne pathogens. Furthermore, we discuss some of the bottlenecks which are currently hindering the development of bacteriocins as viable (...) Bacteriocin-Antimicrobial Synergy: A Medical and Food Perspective The continuing emergence of multi-drug resistant pathogens has sparked an interest in seeking alternative therapeutic options. Antimicrobial combinatorial therapy is one such avenue. A number of studies have been conducted, involving combinations of bacteriocins with other antimicrobials, to circumvent the development of antimicrobial resistance and/or increase antimicrobial potency. Such bacteriocin-antimicrobial combinations

2017 Frontiers in microbiology

17. Antimicrobial stewardship: changing risk-related behaviours in the general population

up this process. Inadequate infection prevention and control practices, poor sanitary conditions and inappropriate food handling encourage the spread of infections that may need the use of antibiotics. Improvements in nutrition, hygiene and sanitation, and reductions in overcrowded housing, have all helped prevent and decrease the transmission of infectious diseases (Davies 2013 [1] ). The World Health Organization estimates that, along with these broad environmental factors, antimicrobials add (...) Behavioural strategies and programmes 42 3 High-risk groups 42 4 Workplace 43 5 Older people in day and residential care 43 Antimicrobial stewardship: changing risk-related behaviours in the general population (NG63) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 4 of 44Ov Overview erview This guideline covers making people aware of how to correctly use antimicrobial medicines (including antibiotics) and the dangers

2017 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

18. Diarrhoea - antibiotic associated

-related behaviours in the general population . Review and, if appropriate, optimise current prescribing practice and use implementation techniques to ensure prescribing is in line with NICE antimicrobial prescribing guidelines or Public Health England (PHE) guidance on managing common infections in primary care, the Department of Health's guidance Start smart − then focus , local trust antimicrobial guidelines and the Antimicrobial Stewardship in Primary Care collaboration TARGET antibiotics toolkit (...) mechanisms [ ; ; ; ; ]: Disruption of the bowel microbiota and mucosal integrity. As a direct effect of the antibiotic (independent of its antimicrobial effect) — for example erythromycin can increase the rate of gastric emptying by acting as a motilin receptor agonist. Overgrowth of toxin-producing strains of Clostridium difficile (a Gram-positive, spore-forming, anaerobic bacillus) due to disruption of harmless bacteria in the gut. Overgrowth of C. difficile alone does not cause diarrhoea. C. difficile

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

19. The antimicrobial efficacy of Lippia alba essential oil and its interaction with food ingredients Full Text available with Trip Pro

The antimicrobial efficacy of Lippia alba essential oil and its interaction with food ingredients The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial potential of Lippia alba essential oil (EOLa) and to investigate the effect of food ingredients on its efficacy. The antimicrobial potential of the oil was determined by the presence or absence of inhibition zones, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) against Escherichia coli, Listeria (...) innocua, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella choleraesuis and Staphylococcus aureus. The effect of food ingredients and the pH on the antimicrobial efficacy of oil was assessed by monitoring the maximum growth rate of Listeria monocytogenes in model media. The model media included potato starch (0, 1, 5 or 10%), beef extract (1, 5, 3, 6 or 12%), sunflower oil (0, 5 or 10%) and TSB broth at pH levels of 4, 5, 6 or 7. The EOLa showed efficacy at all concentrations (50%, 25%, 6.25

2014 Brazilian Journal of Microbiology

20. Antibiotic Food Interactions

Antibiotic Food Interactions Antibiotic Food Interactions Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Antibiotic Food Interactions (...) Antibiotic Food Interactions Aka: Antibiotic Food Interactions From Related Chapters II. Preparations: Antibiotics to take with food Food may reduce gastrointestinal upset Ethionamide ( ) Methenamine ( ) Niclosamide Praziquantel Pyrimethamine Quinacrine (with food and full glass of water) Quinine Rifabutin (may require supplement) Thiabendazole Food increases absorption or bioavailability ( ) ( ) ( ) Clofazimine (take with fatty meal) ( ) Mebendazole (Chew or crush tablet) (with food and a full glass

2015 FP Notebook

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