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Anterior Ankle Nerve Block

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1. Anterior Ankle Nerve Block

Anterior Ankle Nerve Block Anterior Ankle Nerve Block Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Anterior Ankle Nerve Block (...) Anterior Ankle Nerve Block Aka: Anterior Ankle Nerve Block , Regional Anesthesia of the Anterior Ankle , Superficial Peroneal Nerve Block , Deep Peroneal Nerve Block , Saphenous Nerve Block II. Indications Anesthesia of the dorsum of the foot III. Precautions Avoid injecting directly into nerves IV. Preparation Needle: 27 gauge 1.5 inch Anesthetic: 1%: two 10 ml syringes V. Technique Patient position Supine position slightly plantar flexed Injection site 1: Superficial peroneal nerve (most of dorsal

2018 FP Notebook

2. A Comparison Of Block Quality In Anterior And Posterior Approach To Sciatic Nerve Block

approach to sciatic nerve block can be performed, whereas, if a patient has pain secondary to fracture, anterior approach to sciatic nerve block can be performed in order to avoid repositioning. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Ankle Fractures Procedure: Anterior sciatic nerve block Procedure: Posterior sciatic nerve block Not Applicable Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Actual Enrollment : 45 participants Allocation (...) were recorded. After the operation was completed, the time of first diclofenac sodium required by the patients within 24 hours of the post-operative period was recorded. The first postoperative diclofenac sodium dose was administered when a patient had VAS values of 4 or more. Comparison of motor block start time after sciatic nerve block performed with anterior and posterior approaches. [ Time Frame: every minute up to 20 minutes. ] When the ankle joint was unable to move, it was recorded

2018 Clinical Trials

3. Peripheral Nerve Blocks for Post-Operative Pain Relief After Arthroscopic Knee Ligament Reconstruction

of providing superior analgesia than general anesthesia alone. The blockade of the femoral nerve through a femoral nerve block (FNB) will provide sensory anesthesia of the anterior thigh, knee, and medial aspect of the calf, ankle, and foot. (2) A FNB can be obtained with a single shot of local anesthetic or by using a continuous catheter technique, which may prolong its duration of action. One variation of the FNB is the ‘3-in-1’ block, which uses a single paravascular injection to achieve anesthesia (...) : Evidence Quality Assessment 19 References 21 Peripheral Nerve Blocks for Post-Operative Pain Relief After Arthroscopic Knee Ligament Reconstruction: A Rapid Review. August 2014; pp. 1–23 5 List of Abbreviations ACL Anterior cruciate ligament AMSTAR Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews FNB Femoral nerve block GRADE Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation PNB Peripheral nerve block RCT Randomized controlled trial VAS Visual Analogue Scale Peripheral Nerve Blocks for Post

2014 Health Quality Ontario

4. The Effect of Local Anaesthetic Volume on Nerve Block Duration and Nerve Block Duration Variability

Frame: 10-180 minutes ] Testing will start ten minutes after end of infusion and continue for every fifth minute until onset. When onset of sensory nerve block is confirmed, testing of motor nerve block onset will end as well, if not already found. Motor nerve block of the tibial nerve will be evaluated by plantarflexion of the ankle. Motor nerve block of the common peroneal nerve will be tested by dorsiflexion of the ankle. Degree of sensory nerve block [ Time Frame: 1-24 hours ] We will test (...) -24 hours ] This will be tested with the volunteer in the upright position using a sturdy counter for balance if necessary. Motor strength will be evaluated using a normal everyday activation of the lower leg: A toe and a heel raise, testing the common peroneal nerve via activation of the anterior tibial muscle and the tibial nerve via activation of the gastrocnemius muscle, respectively. Motor nerve block intensity will be evaluated on a scale from one to three: 1) normal strength, 2) paresis

2016 Clinical Trials

5. Ultrasound-guided lateral-medial transmuscular quadratus lumborum block for analgesia following anterior iliac crest bone graft harvesting: a clinical and anatomical study. (PubMed)

to musculoskeletal anatomy and direct staining of the thoraco-lumbar nerves were recorded. Following the anatomical findings, continuous catheter TQL blocks were performed in four patients undergoing ankle surgery with autologous AIC bone graft. The dermatomal anesthesia and postoperative analgesic consumption were recorded.In the anatomical component of the study, 9/10 specimens showed a lateral spread anterior to the transversalis fascia and medially between the QLM and psoas major muscle. Direct staining (...) Ultrasound-guided lateral-medial transmuscular quadratus lumborum block for analgesia following anterior iliac crest bone graft harvesting: a clinical and anatomical study. The anterior iliac crest (AIC) is one of the most common sites for harvesting autologous bone, but the associated postoperative pain can result in significant morbidity. Recently, the transmuscular quadratus lumborum block (TQL) has been described to anesthetize the thoraco-lumbar nerves. This study utilizes a combination

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2017 Canadian Journal Of Anaesthesia

6. The Effect of Subsartorial Saphenous Block on Postoperative Pain Following Major Ankle and Hind Foot Surgery

causes intense postoperative pain. Implementation of continuous sciatic catheters has been a great success in reducing postoperative pain following these operations, but despite an effective sciatic catheter patients still report moderate to severe pain from the anteromedial side of the ankle. According to cadaver dissection studies the saphenous nerve innervates the anterior and medial parts of the ankle and talonavicular joint, and even though a saphenous block is standard procedure in many (...) rating scale). Significant pain is defined as NRS > 3 from the anterior and/medial side of the ankle joint. In case of significant pain, patients receive a rescue saphenous block with 10 ml bupivacaine-adrenaline. Secondary Outcome Measures : Sensory testing, infrapatellar branch (nociception is tested using a standardized Neuropen) [ Time Frame: At the time point when the patients report a change to significant pain during the observation period. In case of no significant pain during the observation

2016 Clinical Trials

7. Anterior Ankle Nerve Block

Anterior Ankle Nerve Block Anterior Ankle Nerve Block Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Anterior Ankle Nerve Block (...) Anterior Ankle Nerve Block Aka: Anterior Ankle Nerve Block , Regional Anesthesia of the Anterior Ankle , Superficial Peroneal Nerve Block , Deep Peroneal Nerve Block , Saphenous Nerve Block II. Indications Anesthesia of the dorsum of the foot III. Precautions Avoid injecting directly into nerves IV. Preparation Needle: 27 gauge 1.5 inch Anesthetic: 1%: two 10 ml syringes V. Technique Patient position Supine position slightly plantar flexed Injection site 1: Superficial peroneal nerve (most of dorsal

2015 FP Notebook

8. Chronic Ankle Pain

Arthrography MR arthrography is not routinely used for the evaluation of pain of unknown etiology in the ankle. Image-guided Anesthetic Injection US-guided nerve blocks have been reported to be helpful for diagnostic purposes and to plan for surgical or procedural intervention [87-89]. Radiography Stress views are not routinely used for the evaluation of pain of unknown etiology in the ankle. Other Causes of Chronic Ankle Pain Tarsal tunnel syndrome Tarsal tunnel syndrome can also be a cause of chronic (...) ]. Discussion of Procedures by Variant Variant 1: Chronic ankle pain. Initial imaging. Radiography Radiography should be considered as the initial imaging study. Radiographs may reveal osteoarthritis, calcified or ossified intra-articular bodies, osteochondral abnormalities, stress fractures, or evidence of prior trauma. Ankle effusions may also be identified in the anterior ankle joint recess by radiography with 53% to 74% accuracy [19]. They are often associated with ligamentous injury or fracture [19

2017 American College of Radiology

9. Ankle and Foot Surgical Guideline

Ligament Repair/ Reconstruction e.g. Br?strom procedure, Watson- Jones procedure Severe ankle sprain or recurrent sprains leading to instability A discrete documented work-related ankle injury AND Ankle “gives way” OR Swelling OR Difficulty walking on uneven ground Positive instability testing: e.g. Anterior drawer testing OR Asymmetric inversion laxity (when compared to contralateral side) Bilateral stress X-rays w/ asymmetrical stress tests: Talar tilt > 10 degrees OR Anterior displacement index (...) or Diagnosis Subjective Objective Imaging Non-operative care Medial Cuneiform Osteotomy Lateral Column Lengthening Kidner Procedure valgus and pes planus posture of the foot, this condition does not arise from and is not worsened by cumulative weight bearing in the workplace Tarsal Tunnel Release Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) A discrete documented work-related foot/ankle injury AND Pain/paresthesias in the distribution of the medial and/or lateral plantar nerves If a compressive lesion is not present on MRI

2017 Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

10. Effects of Catheter Location on Postoperative Analgesia for Continuous Adductor Canal and Popliteal-Sciatic Nerve Blocks

Posted : August 14, 2015 Last Update Posted : March 12, 2018 Sponsor: University of California, San Diego Information provided by (Responsible Party): Brian M. Ilfeld, MD, MS, University of California, San Diego Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Currently, continuous adductor canal and popliteal-sciatic nerve blocks are used commonly for lower extremity post-operative pain control, specifically for total knee arthroplasty and foot/ankle surgery, respectively. A perineural catheter (...) Effects of Catheter Location on Postoperative Analgesia for Continuous Adductor Canal and Popliteal-Sciatic Nerve Blocks Effects of Catheter Location on Postoperative Analgesia for Continuous Adductor Canal and Popliteal-Sciatic Nerve Blocks - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum

2015 Clinical Trials

11. Nerve Block, Sural

, and sural nerve blocks results in complete block of sensory perception beneath the ankle (see the image below). Areas of anesthetization to complete an ankle block. This block requires anesthetization of 5 nerves for complete sensory block below the ankle. The areas to anesthetize include a line along the anterior ankle for the superficial peroneal nerve (blue line), the deep peroneal nerve (red star), the saphenous nerve (pink star), the sural nerve (green arrow), and the posterior tibial nerve (orange (...) for complete sensory block below the ankle. The areas to anesthetize include a line along the anterior ankle for the superficial peroneal nerve (blue line), the deep peroneal nerve (red star), the saphenous nerve (pink star), the sural nerve (green arrow), and the posterior tibial nerve (orange arrow). Equipment needed for regional block. The sural nerve as it travels down the posterior calf. Sural nerve dermatome at the level of the posterior calf. Sural nerve dermatome at the level of the sole

2014 eMedicine.com

12. Nerve Block, Superficial Peroneal

splits to fan out between the medial and lateral malleoli. See the images below. Dermatome of the superficial peroneal nerve at the level of posterior calf. Superficial peroneal nerve dermatome at the level of the anterior lower leg. Next: Indications See the list below: Wound repair or exploration of the dorsal regions of the foot As part of an ankle block required to manipulate a fracture or (A combination of , , superficial peroneal, deep peroneal, and nerve blocks results in complete block (...) of sensory perception beneath the ankle. Compared with more proximal approaches to the ankle block, motor block is rarely a concern with the ankle block. [ ] See the image below. Areas of anesthetization to complete an ankle block. This block requires anesthetization of 5 nerves for complete sensory block below the ankle. The areas to anesthetize include a line along the anterior ankle for the superficial peroneal nerve (blue line), the deep peroneal nerve (red star), the saphenous nerve (pink star

2014 eMedicine.com

13. Nerve Block, Posterior Tibial

include a line along the anterior ankle for the superficial peroneal nerve (blue line), the deep peroneal nerve (red star), the saphenous nerve (pink star), the sural nerve (green arrow), and the posterior tibial nerve (orange arrow). Contraindications Contraindications to posterior tibial nerve block include the following: Allergy to anesthetic solution or additives (eg, ester, amide) Injection through infected tissue Severe bleeding disorder or coagulopathy Preexisting neurological damage Patient (...) below the ankle. The areas to anesthetize include a line along the anterior ankle for the superficial peroneal nerve (blue line), the deep peroneal nerve (red star), the saphenous nerve (pink star), the sural nerve (green arrow), and the posterior tibial nerve (orange arrow). Equipment needed for the regional block. Posterior tibial nerve block landmarks. Medial malleolus (MM) is at the left and Achilles tendon is at right. Posterior tibial artery (A) is approximately 1 cm inferior to the site

2014 eMedicine.com

14. Nerve Block, Saphenous

and the anterior tibial tendon, just lateral to the saphenous vein. See the images below. Saphenous nerve dermatome of the anteromedial leg. Saphenous nerve dermatome at the level of the foot. Next: Indications See the list below: Wound repair or exploration of the medial malleolus or anteromedial lower extremity As part of an ankle block required to manipulate a or (A combination of , saphenous, , deep peroneal, and nerve blocks results in complete block of sensory perception beneath the ankle. See the image (...) below.) Areas of anesthetization to complete an ankle block. This block requires anesthetization of 5 nerves for complete sensory block below the ankle. The areas to anesthetize include a line along the anterior ankle for the superficial peroneal nerve (blue line), the deep peroneal nerve (red star), the saphenous nerve (pink star), the sural nerve (green arrow), and the posterior tibial nerve (orange arrow). Incision and drainage of an abscess in the medial malleolus or anteromedial lower extremity

2014 eMedicine.com

15. Popliteal Plexus Block for Total Knee Arthroplasty

Description: A femoral triangle block (FTB) effectively anesthetizes the anterior group of nerves innervating the knee (infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve, the medial femoral cutaneous nerve and the terminal branch of the medial vastus muscle nerve). However, the posterior group of nerves innervating the knee joint is not covered with an FTB, and therefore most patients complain of significant, opioid-requiring pain despite a successful FTB. The posterior group consists of the popliteal plexus (...) , which is derived from the tibial nerve and the posterior branch of the obturator nerve. The popliteal plexus is located in the popliteal fossa, where it entwines the popliteal artery and vein. Recent cadaver studies have suggested that an injection into the distal part of the adductor canal will spread to the popliteal fossa (PubMed Identifier (ID): 28937534; PubMed ID: 27442773). This study aims to assess the analgesic effect of the popliteal plexus block (PPB) as a supplement to a femoral triangle

2018 Clinical Trials

16. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Peripheral Nerve Stimulation: A Department of Defense Funded Multicenter Study

: All Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No Criteria Inclusion Criteria: 18 years of age or older undergoing one of the following surgical procedures: rotator cuff repair, anterior cruciate ligament repair with a patellar autograph, ankle arthrodesis or arthroplasty, hallux valgus correction with a planned single-injection peripheral nerve block for postoperative analgesia Exclusion Criteria: chronic analgesic use including opioids (daily use within the 2 weeks prior to surgery and duration of use > 4 (...) on both individuals and society; while concurrently improving analgesia, increasing the ability to function in daily life, decreasing the risk of transition from acute to chronic pain, and improving quality of life. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Rotator Cuff Repair Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With a Patella Autograph Ankle Arthrodesis or Arthroplasty Hallux Valgus Correction Device: ACTIVE peripheral nerve stimulation with a percutaneously inserted lead and wearable

2018 Clinical Trials

17. Popliteal Plexus Block for Postoperative Pain After ACL Reconstruction

: No Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No Keywords provided by University of Aarhus: Peripheral nerve block Ultrasound Additional relevant MeSH terms: Layout table for MeSH terms Pain, Postoperative Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries Postoperative Complications Pathologic Processes Pain Neurologic Manifestations Signs and Symptoms Knee Injuries Leg Injuries Wounds and Injuries (...) of Aarhus Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: The study aims to investigate the effect of the popliteal plexus block (PPB) on postoperative pain in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Postoperative Pain Procedure: Popliteal plexus block Not Applicable Detailed Description: Postoperative pain following ACL reconstruction can be alleviated with an ultrasound-guided femoral

2017 Clinical Trials

18. Ultrasonography and stimulating perineural catheters for nerve blocks: a review of the evidence

ultrasonography studies consisted of ultrasonography-guided axillary, lateral sciatic or femoral (with and without subgluteal/popliteal sciatic block) nerve blocks. Comparator groups consisted of trans-arterial technique and neurostimulation. The number of injections ranged from one to four. Trials included patients undergoing surgery of the forearm, wrist, hand, ankle, and lower extremities and knee arthroscopy. Outcomes reported were incidence of side effects, surgery failure, success rate, time (...) to readiness for surgery, minimal effective volume to block the nerve in 50% of patients, number of attempts, and duration of sensory block. One trial included children; details on included patient ages were not reported for other trials. Catheter trials compared stimulating and blind catheters for interscalene, femoral, and posterior popliteal sciatic blocks. They assessed patients undergoing shoulder surgery, total knee replacement, anterior cruciate ligament repair, hallux valgus repair or healthy

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2008 DARE.

19. Fascia Iliaca Block

: Fascia Iliaca Block , Iliacus Fascia II. Indications covering proximal femur (anterior medial thigh) to knee Also provides to medial lower leg and ankle Mid-shaft (also covered by ) III. Contraindications (e.g. , , ) Multi-system IV. Anatomy: Landmarks Iliacus muscle Originates at the ilium and joins with the psoas to form the iliopsoas muscle Iliopsoas muscle runs under the inguinal ligament and inserts on the lesser trochanter of the femur Iliacus and iliopsoas muscles are covered in a dense fascia (...) (approximately 6 cm) Mark anterior superior iliac spine or ASIS (approximately 9 cm) Injection site should be near the two thirds mark Mark approximaly 5-7 cm mark (or 2-4 cm from the lateral margin) Confirm position by palpating the femoral artery Femoral Artery should be at least 2 fingerbreadths medial to the injection site -Guidance (preferred) Identify femoral artery and vein in short axis Femoral nerve will be lateral to femoral artery Slide probe laterally to 2 hyperechoic lines/planes overlying

2018 FP Notebook

20. Evaluation of Continuous Saphenous Nerve Block to Supplement a Continuous Sciatic Nerve Block After Ankle Surgery

Evaluation of Continuous Saphenous Nerve Block to Supplement a Continuous Sciatic Nerve Block After Ankle Surgery Evaluation of Continuous Saphenous Nerve Block to Supplement a Continuous Sciatic Nerve Block After Ankle Surgery - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved (...) studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Evaluation of Continuous Saphenous Nerve Block to Supplement a Continuous Sciatic Nerve Block After Ankle Surgery The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01167907 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : July 22, 2010

2010 Clinical Trials

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