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Angry Behavior

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1. The behavioral and neural binding phenomena during visuomotor integration of angry facial expressions (PubMed)

The behavioral and neural binding phenomena during visuomotor integration of angry facial expressions Different parts of our brain code the perceptual features and actions related to an object, causing a binding problem, in which the brain has to integrate information related to an event without any interference regarding the features and actions involved in other concurrently processed events. Using a paradigm similar to Hommel, who revealed perception-action bindings, we showed that emotion (...) could bind with motor actions when relevant, and in specific conditions, irrelevant for the task. By adapting our protocol to a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging paradigm we investigated, in the present study, the neural bases of the emotion-action binding with task-relevant angry faces. Our results showed that emotion bound with motor responses. This integration revealed increased activity in distributed brain areas involved in: (i) memory, including the hippocampi; (ii) motor actions

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2018 Scientific reports

2. A forgetful and angry old lady (PubMed)

A forgetful and angry old lady Dementia is typically characterized by the deterioration of cognitive abilities and is a common disorder among the elderly in Malaysia. However, behavioral and psychological symptoms are also present in approximately 90% of dementia patients.1 We report the manifestation of these symptoms in an elderly woman with dementia and the treatment thereof.

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2018 Malaysian family physician : the official journal of the Academy of Family Physicians of Malaysia

3. Access to firearms in the USA: angry and impulsive behaviour in people with and without mental disorders

and impulsive behaviour in people with and without mental disorders E Naomi Smith Correspondence to The Maudsley Training Programme, London, UK; elizabeth.smith{at}psych.ox.ac.uk Statistics from Altmetric.com ABSTRACT FROM: Swanson, JW, Sampson NA, Petukhova MV, et al . Guns, Impulsive Angry Behavior, and Mental Disorders: Results from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R). Behavioral sciences & the law. 2015;33:199–212. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ON THIS TOPIC There is significant morbidity (...) Access to firearms in the USA: angry and impulsive behaviour in people with and without mental disorders Access to firearms in the USA: angry and impulsive behaviour in people with and without mental disorders | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password

2016 Evidence-Based Mental Health

4. Angry Behavior

Angry Behavior Angry Behavior Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Angry Behavior Angry Behavior Aka: Angry Behavior (...) , Anger Management From Related Chapters II. Management Count backwards See a flower or your favorite scene s Breathe deep Get in touch with your body Feel hot in one palm, cold in the other Time management Identify the trigger thought Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Angry Behavior." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related

2018 FP Notebook

5. Endogenous testosterone is associated with lower amygdala reactivity to angry faces and reduced aggressive behavior in healthy young women (PubMed)

Endogenous testosterone is associated with lower amygdala reactivity to angry faces and reduced aggressive behavior in healthy young women Testosterone and cortisol have been proposed to influence aggressive behavior by altering the neural processing of facial threat signals. However, this has not been investigated in direct social interactions. Here, we explored the joint impact of testosterone, cortisol, and brain reactivity to anger expressions on women's reactive aggression in the Social (...) Threat Aggression Paradigm (STAP). The STAP is a competitive reaction time task in which the purported opponent displays either an angry or a neutral facial expression at the beginning of each trial and delivers increasingly loud sound blasts to the participants, successfully provoking them. Strikingly, salivary testosterone at scan-time was negatively related to both aggression and basolateral amygdala (BLA) reactivity to angry faces, whereas cortisol had no effect. When the opponent looked angry

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2016 Scientific reports

6. Do Angry Birds Make for Angry Children? A Meta-Analysis of Video Game Influences on Children's and Adolescents' Aggression, Mental Health, Prosocial Behavior, and Academic Performance. (PubMed)

Do Angry Birds Make for Angry Children? A Meta-Analysis of Video Game Influences on Children's and Adolescents' Aggression, Mental Health, Prosocial Behavior, and Academic Performance. The issue of whether video games-violent or nonviolent-"harm" children and adolescents continues to be hotly contested in the scientific community, among politicians, and in the general public. To date, researchers have focused on college student samples in most studies on video games, often with poorly (...) aggression (r = .06), reduced prosocial behavior (r = .04), reduced academic performance (r = -.01), depressive symptoms (r = .04), and attention deficit symptoms (r = .03) are minimal. Issues related to researchers' degrees of freedom and citation bias also continue to be common problems for the field. Publication bias remains a problem for studies of aggression. Recommendations are given on how research may be improved and how the psychological community should address video games from a public health

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2015 Perspectives on psychological science : a journal of the Association for Psychological Science

7. Gender Differences in Processing Fearful and Angry Body Expressions (PubMed)

gender) or gender-incongruent (i.e., better recognition of emotions expressed by subjects of the opposite gender). Here, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the recognition of fearful and angry body expressions posed by males and females. Male and female observers also completed an affective rating task (including valence, intensity, and arousal ratings). Behavioral results showed that male observers reported higher arousal rating scores for angry body expressions posed by females (...) Gender Differences in Processing Fearful and Angry Body Expressions Previous studies have demonstrated differential perception of body expressions between males and females. However, only two recent studies (Kret et al., 2011; Krüger et al., 2013) explored the interaction effect between observer gender and subject gender, and it remains unclear whether this interaction between the two gender factors is gender-congruent (i.e., better recognition of emotions expressed by subjects of the same

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2018 Frontiers in behavioral neuroscience

8. Hostile Attribution Bias Mediates the Relationship Between Structural Variations in the Left Middle Frontal Gyrus and Trait Angry Rumination (PubMed)

Hostile Attribution Bias Mediates the Relationship Between Structural Variations in the Left Middle Frontal Gyrus and Trait Angry Rumination Angry rumination is a common mental phenomenon which may lead to negative social behaviors such as aggression. Although numerous neuroimaging studies have focused on brain area activation during angry rumination, to our knowledge no study has examined the neuroanatomical and cognitive mechanisms of this process. In this study, we conducted a voxel-based (...) morphometry analysis, using a region of interest analysis to identify the structural and cognitive mechanisms underlying individual differences in trait angry rumination (as measured by the Angry Rumination Scale) in a sample of 82 undergraduate students. We found that angry rumination was positively correlated with gray matter density in the left middle frontal gyrus (left-MFG), which is implicated in inhibition control, working memory, and emotional regulation. The mediation analysis further revealed

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2018 Frontiers in psychology

9. Brief Training on Patient Anger Increases Oncology Providers' Self-Efficacy in Communicating with Angry Patients. (PubMed)

Brief Training on Patient Anger Increases Oncology Providers' Self-Efficacy in Communicating with Angry Patients. Anger is a common reaction to pain and life-limiting and life-threatening illness, is linked to higher levels of pain, and may disrupt communication with medical providers. Anger is understudied compared with other emotions in mental health and health care contexts, and many providers have limited formal training in addressing anger.The objective of this study was to assess (...) if a brief provider training program is a feasible method for increasing providers' self-efficacy in responding to patient anger.Providers working in stem cell transplant and oncology units attending a brief training session on responding to patient anger. The program was informed by cognitive behavioral models of anger and included didactics, discussion, and experiential training on communication and stress management.Provider-rated self-efficacy was significantly higher for nine of 10 skill outcomes (P

2017 Journal of pain and symptom management

10. Neural Reactivity to Angry Faces Predicts Treatment Response in Pediatric Anxiety (PubMed)

Neural Reactivity to Angry Faces Predicts Treatment Response in Pediatric Anxiety Although cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy (CBT) and pharmacotherapy are evidence-based treatments for pediatric anxiety, many youth with anxiety disorders fail to respond to these treatments. Given limitations of clinical measures in predicting treatment response, identifying neural predictors is timely. In this study, 35 anxious youth (ages 7-19 years) completed an emotional face-matching task during which (...) such that enhanced electrocortical response to angry faces was associated with better treatment response. An enhanced LPP to angry faces may predict treatment response insofar as it may reflect greater emotion dysregulation or less avoidance and/or enhanced engagement with environmental stimuli in general, including with treatment.

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2017 Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

11. Emotional Intensity Modulates the Integration of Bimodal Angry Expressions: ERP Evidence (PubMed)

Emotional Intensity Modulates the Integration of Bimodal Angry Expressions: ERP Evidence Integration of information from face and voice plays a central role in social interactions. The present study investigated the modulation of emotional intensity on the integration of facial-vocal emotional cues by recording EEG for participants while they were performing emotion identification task on facial, vocal, and bimodal angry expressions varying in emotional intensity. Behavioral results showed (...) the rates of anger and reaction speed increased as emotional intensity across modalities. Critically, the P2 amplitudes were larger for bimodal expressions than for the sum of facial and vocal expressions for low emotional intensity stimuli, but not for middle and high emotional intensity stimuli. These findings suggested that emotional intensity modulates the integration of facial-vocal angry expressions, following the principle of Inverse Effectiveness (IE) in multimodal sensory integration.

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2017 Frontiers in neuroscience

12. Modulation of Auditory Spatial Attention by Angry Prosody: An fMRI Auditory Dot-Probe Study (PubMed)

is the general aim of the present study. Therefore, we used an original auditory dot-probe paradigm involving simultaneously presented neutral and angry non-speech vocal utterances lateralized to either the left or the right auditory space, immediately followed by a short and lateralized single sine wave tone presented in the same (valid trial) or in the opposite space as the preceding angry voice (invalid trial). Behavioral results showed an expected facilitation effect for target detection during valid (...) Modulation of Auditory Spatial Attention by Angry Prosody: An fMRI Auditory Dot-Probe Study Emotional stimuli have been shown to modulate attentional orienting through signals sent by subcortical brain regions that modulate visual perception at early stages of processing. Fewer studies, however, have investigated a similar effect of emotional stimuli on attentional orienting in the auditory domain together with an investigation of brain regions underlying such attentional modulation, which

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2016 Frontiers in neuroscience

13. Angry, Scared, and Unsure: Mental Health Consequences of Contaminated Water in Flint, Michigan (PubMed)

Angry, Scared, and Unsure: Mental Health Consequences of Contaminated Water in Flint, Michigan Natural and manmade crises impact community-level behavioral health, including mental health and substance use. This article shares findings from a larger project about community behavioral health, relevant to the ongoing water crisis in Flint, Michigan, using data from a larger study, involving monthly surveys of a panel of key informants from Genesee County. The data come from open-response

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2016 Journal of urban health : bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine

14. Expressing Anger Is More Dangerous than Feeling Angry when Driving (PubMed)

Expressing Anger Is More Dangerous than Feeling Angry when Driving Anger is an emotion that drivers often feel and express while driving, and it is believed by researchers to be an important cause of dangerous driving behavior. In this study, the relationships between driving trait anger, driving anger expression, and dangerous driving behaviors were analyzed. The Driving Anger Scale (DAS) was used to measure driving trait anger, whereas the Driving Anger Expression (DAX) Inventory was used (...) to measure expressions of driving anger. A sample of 38 drivers completed the DAS, DAX, and a driving simulation session on a simulator where their driving behaviors were recorded. Correlation analysis showed that the higher scores on the DAS were associated with longer durations of speeding in the simulator. The more participants expressed their anger in verbal and physical ways, the more likely they were to crash the virtual vehicle during the simulation. Regression analyses illustrated the same

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2016 PloS one

15. Closing the Generational Gap in Surgery: Why So Angry? (PubMed)

Closing the Generational Gap in Surgery: Why So Angry? Significant and rapid changes in healthcare delivery are forcing surgeons into collaborative teams. Additionally, surgeons are faced with new bureaucratic requirements that do not directly impact patient care, but nevertheless require allocation of time and attention. Surgeons are required to communicate with an expanding group of individuals at various professional levels, adding further stress to daily tasks. Even the method (...) of communication is undergoing rapid transformation. Some surgeons, especially those who are members of the Boomer or X Generation, find this revolution difficult to manage; whereas those who are members of the Y Generation may in fact be better equipped. Surgeons who either refuse to acknowledge these changes or simply lack emotional self-awareness run the risk of being labeled as disruptive. Behavioral techniques are explored which may help those surgeons who are having difficulty.

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2016 Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open

16. Angry Behavior

Angry Behavior Angry Behavior Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Angry Behavior Angry Behavior Aka: Angry Behavior (...) , Anger Management From Related Chapters II. Management Count backwards See a flower or your favorite scene s Breathe deep Get in touch with your body Feel hot in one palm, cold in the other Time management Identify the trigger thought Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Angry Behavior." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related

2015 FP Notebook

17. Syllogisms delivered in an angry voice lead to improved performance and engagement of a different neural system compared to neutral voice (PubMed)

Syllogisms delivered in an angry voice lead to improved performance and engagement of a different neural system compared to neutral voice Despite the fact that most real-world reasoning occurs in some emotional context, very little is known about the underlying behavioral and neural implications of such context. To further understand the role of emotional context in logical reasoning we scanned 15 participants with fMRI while they engaged in logical reasoning about neutral syllogisms presented (...) through the auditory channel in a sad, angry, or neutral tone of voice. Exposure to angry voice led to improved reasoning performance compared to exposure to sad and neutral voice. A likely explanation for this effect is that exposure to expressions of anger increases selective attention toward the relevant features of target stimuli, in this case the reasoning task. Supporting this interpretation, reasoning in the context of angry voice was accompanied by activation in the superior frontal gyrus

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2015 Frontiers in human neuroscience

18. Emotional reactions to deviance in groups: the relation between number of angry reactions, felt rejection, and conformity (PubMed)

Emotional reactions to deviance in groups: the relation between number of angry reactions, felt rejection, and conformity How many members of a group need to express their anger in order to influence a deviant group member's behavior? In two studies, we examine whether an increase in number of angry group members affects the extent to which a deviant individual feels rejected, and we investigate downstream effects on conformity. We show that each additional angry reaction linearly increases (...) the extent to which a deviant individual feels rejected, and that this relation is independent of the total number of majority members (Study 1). This felt rejection is then shown to lead to anti-conformity unless two conditions are met: (1) the deviant is motivated to seek reacceptance in the group, and (2) conformity is instrumental in gaining reacceptance because it is observable by the majority (Study 2). These findings show that angry reactions are likely to trigger anti-conformity in a deviant

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2015 Frontiers in psychology

19. Walk to me when I smile, step back when I’m angry: emotional faces modulate whole-body approach–avoidance behaviors (PubMed)

Walk to me when I smile, step back when I’m angry: emotional faces modulate whole-body approach–avoidance behaviors Facial expressions are potent social cues that can induce behavioral dispositions, such as approach-avoidance tendencies. We studied these tendencies by asking participants to make whole-body forward (approach) or backward (avoidance) steps on a force plate in response to the valence of social cues (happy or angry faces) under affect-congruent and incongruent mappings (...) . Posturographic parameters of the steps related to automatic stimulus evaluation, step initiation (reaction time), and step execution were determined and analyzed as a function of stimulus valence and stimulus-response mapping. The main result was that participants needed more time to initiate a forward step towards an angry face than towards a smiling face (which is evidence of a congruency effect), but with backward steps, this difference failed to reach significance. We also found a reduction

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2011 Experimental brain research. Experimentelle Hirnforschung. Experimentation cerebrale

20. Impulsive Traits and Unplanned Suicide Attempts Predict Exaggerated Prefrontal Response to Angry Faces in the Elderly. (PubMed)

Impulsive Traits and Unplanned Suicide Attempts Predict Exaggerated Prefrontal Response to Angry Faces in the Elderly. Abnormal responses to social stimuli are seen in people vulnerable to suicidal behavior, indicating possible disruptions in the neural circuitry mediating the interpretation of socioemotional cues. These disruptions have not been empirically related to psychological and cognitive pathways to suicide. In the present study of older suicide attempters, we examined neural responses (...) to emotional faces and their relationship to impulsivity, one of the components of the suicidal diathesis.Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we recorded neurohemodynamic responses to angry faces in a carefully characterized sample of 18 depressed elderly with history of suicide attempts, 13 depressed nonsuicidal patients, and 18 healthy individuals, all aged 60+. Impulsivity was assessed with the Social Problem Solving Inventory Impulsivity/Carelessness Style subscale and Barratt Impulsiveness

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2014 The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

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