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Androgenic Alopecia

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161. Evaluation of androgen receptor gene as a candidate gene in female androgenetic alopecia. (PubMed)

Evaluation of androgen receptor gene as a candidate gene in female androgenetic alopecia. Genetic polymorphisms of the androgen receptor (AR) gene have been studied in male androgenetic alopecia (AGA); however, little is known about gene polymorphism and female AGA.To evaluate the AR gene as a candidate gene for female AGA.Thirty premenopausal Egyptian female patients with AGA (mean age, 32.3 +/- 7 years) and 11 age- and sex-matched controls were included. All subjects underwent laboratory

2009 International Journal of Dermatology

162. Treatment of Androgenic Alopecia in Males

Treatment of Androgenic Alopecia in Males Treatment of Androgenic Alopecia in Males - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Treatment of Androgenic Alopecia in Males The safety and scientific (...) Description Go to Brief Summary: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the change in terminal hair count at 16 and 26 weeks compared to baseline measurements. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Androgenetic Alopecia Hair Loss Male Pattern Baldness Device: HairMax LaserComb Device: Control device Not Applicable Detailed Description: This is randomized, double-blind, control device clinical study across 3 sites, evaluating changes in terminal hair-count in the evaluation zone having

2009 Clinical Trials

164. Assessment of hirsutism

Around 70% to 80% of women with androgen excess manifest hirsutism. Azziz R. The evaluation and management of hirsutism. Obstet Gynecol. 2003 May;101(5 Pt 1):995-1007. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12738163?tool=bestpractice.com Excessive sexual hair may be accompanied by signs of virilisation: male-pattern alopecia, deepening of the voice, clitoromegaly, increased muscle bulk. When present, virilisation indicates an underlying condition associated with moderately to severely elevated androgen (...) Assessment of hirsutism Assessment of hirsutism - Differential diagnosis of symptoms | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Assessment of hirsutism Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: November 2018 Summary Hirsutism is a condition seen in women that is associated with development of androgen-dependent terminal hair (coarse, pigmented) following a male-pattern distribution (face, chest, abdomen, back). Pathophysiology Hair in different

2018 BMJ Best Practice

165. Assessment of hirsutism

Around 70% to 80% of women with androgen excess manifest hirsutism. Azziz R. The evaluation and management of hirsutism. Obstet Gynecol. 2003 May;101(5 Pt 1):995-1007. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12738163?tool=bestpractice.com Excessive sexual hair may be accompanied by signs of virilisation: male-pattern alopecia, deepening of the voice, clitoromegaly, increased muscle bulk. When present, virilisation indicates an underlying condition associated with moderately to severely elevated androgen (...) Assessment of hirsutism Assessment of hirsutism - Differential diagnosis of symptoms | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Assessment of hirsutism Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: November 2018 Summary Hirsutism is a condition seen in women that is associated with development of androgen-dependent terminal hair (coarse, pigmented) following a male-pattern distribution (face, chest, abdomen, back). Pathophysiology Hair in different

2018 BMJ Best Practice

166. Finasteride

Academy of Dermatology J. Am. Acad. Dermatol. A randomized, active- and placebo-controlled study of the efficacy and safety of different doses of dutasteride versus placebo and finasteride (...) in the treatment of male subjects with androgenetic alopecia. 489-498.e3 10.1016/j.jaad.2013.10.049 S0190-9622(13)01171-7 Dihydrotestosterone is the main androgen causative of androgenetic alopecia, a psychologically and physically harmful condition warranting medical treatment. We sought to compare (...) in reporting of sexual dysfunction with the use of finasteride was observed whether finasteride was indicated for hair loss (ROR = 138.17, 95% CI: 133.13, 143.4), prostatic hyperplasia (ROR= 93.88, 95% CI 2017 6. Finasteride adverse effects in subjects with androgenic alopecia: A possible therapeutic approach according to the lateralization process of the brain. Nowadays, finasteride is a relatively frequently prescribed drug in the therapeutic management of male androgenic alopecia. The reported adverse

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

167. International evidence-based guideline for the assessment and management of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

Council (NHMRC) through the funded Centre for Research Excellence in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (CREPCOS) (APP1078444) and the members of this Centre who led and co-ordinated this international guideline effort 2 Our partner organisations which co-funded the guideline: ? American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) ? European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) 3 Our collaborating and engaged societies and consumer groups: ? Androgen Excess and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Society (...) Exercise interventions 79 3.5 Obesity and weight assessment 82 CONTENTS International evidence-based guideline for the assessment and management of polycystic ovary syndrome 2018 3 Chapter Four Pharmacological treatment for non-fertility indications 84 4.1 Pharmacological treatment principles in PCOS 85 4.2 Combined Oral Contraceptive Pills and & combined oral contraceptive pills in 4.3 combination with other agents 86 4.4 Metformin 91 4.5 Anti-obesity pharmacological agents 95 4.6 Anti-androgen

2018 European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology

168. An International Consortium Update: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of PCOS in Adolescence

therapy, however, may require investigation of androgen excess [ , ]. In a 5-year longitudinal analysis, development of moderate to severe inflammatory acne has been reported to be associated with androgen excess [ ]. Alopecia is rare and not well studied in adolescents [ ]. Isolated acne and alopecia should not be considered to be diagnostic criteria of PCOS in adolescence. Premature adrenarche (PA), defined in girls as the appearance of pubic hair before 8 years of age with Tanner II–III levels (...) , and menstrual irregularities 2 years beyond menarche, and elevated androgen levels. Polycystic ovarian morphology on ultrasound without hyperandrogenism or menstrual irregularities should not be used to diagnose adolescent PCOS. Hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and obesity may be present in adolescents with PCOS, but are not considered to be diagnostic criteria. Treatment of adolescent PCOS should include lifestyle intervention, local therapies, and medications. Insulin sensitizers like metformin

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2019 Pediatric Endocrine Society

169. Testosterone replacement in menopause

as appropriate female physiological doses are prescribed adverse androgenic effects are not problematic and virilising problems do not occur. Reported adverse effects are shown below; if thought to be linked, the dosage should be reduced or treatment stopped. • Increased body hair at site of application (occasional problem) – spread more thinly, vary site of application, reduce dosage. • Generalised Hirsutism (uncommon) • Alopecia, male pattern hair loss (uncommon) • Acne and greasy skin (uncommon (...) . Testosterone deficiency can also contribute to a reduction in general quality of life, tiredness, depression, headaches, cognitive problems, osteoporosis and sarcopenia. 4 What other effects can testosterone have in the post-menopause? After the menopause, estrogen levels fall to undetectable levels. Consequently, the small amount of remaining testosterone may predispose to androgenic symptoms, especially acne, increased facial hair growth and male pattern baldness. Personal genetics are key

2019 British Menopause Society

171. Diagnosis and Treatment of Early Stage Testicular Cancer

Recommendation; Evidence Level: Grade B) 13a. In patients with GCNIS on testis biopsy or malignant neoplasm after TSS, clinicians should inform patients of the risks/benefits of surveillance, radiation, and orchiectomy. (Moderate Recommendation; Evidence Level: Grade C) 13b. Clinicians should recommend surveillance in patients with GCNIS or malignant neoplasm after TSS who prioritize preservation of fertility and testicular androgen production. (Moderate Recommendation; Evidence Level: Grade C) 13c

2019 American Urological Association

172. Screening and Management of the Hyperandrogenic Adolescent

. c Monitoring serum androgens is not recommended. Introduction Although androgen excess can manifest in many ways, the most common and recognizable symptoms are hirsutism and acne. (Alopecia also may be a symptom.) Hirsutism affects 5–10% of reproductive-aged females and is defined as excessive terminal hair growth in a distribution typically seen in adult men (face, sternum, lower abdomen, back, and thighs) (1). Acne vulgaris is a multifactorial skin con (...) Screening and Management of the Hyperandrogenic Adolescent ACOGCOMMITTEEOPINION Number 789 Committee on Adolescent Health Care This Committee Opinion was developed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ Committee on Adolescent Health Care in collaboration with committee members Jennie Yoost, MD and Ashlyn Savage, MD. Screening and Management of the Hyperandrogenic Adolescent ABSTRACT: Although androgen excess can manifest in many ways, the most common and recognizable

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

173. Evaluation and Treatment of Hirsutism in Premenopausal Women

are elevated in the remainder of cases of mild hirsutism and in most cases of more severe hirsutism ( , , ) (Section 5, Androgen Testing Remarks). Most women with a twofold or greater elevation of serum androgen levels have some degree of hirsutism or an alternative pilosebaceous response, such as excessive acne vulgaris, seborrhea, or female- or male-pattern alopecia. Other causes of androgen overproduction are infrequent ( , ). NCCAH, the most common of these disorders, is present in 4.2 (...) . The task force commissioned two systematic reviews and used the best available evidence from other published systematic reviews and individual studies. Consensus Process Group meetings, conference calls, and e-mail communications facilitated consensus development. Endocrine Society committees, members, and cosponsoring organizations reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of the guidelines. Conclusion We suggest testing for elevated androgen levels in all women with an abnormal hirsutism score. We

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2018 The Endocrine Society

174. Evaluation and Treatment of Hirsutism in Premenopausal Women

are elevated in the remainder of cases of mild hirsutism and in most cases of more severe hirsutism ( , , ) (Section 5, Androgen Testing Remarks). Most women with a twofold or greater elevation of serum androgen levels have some degree of hirsutism or an alternative pilosebaceous response, such as excessive acne vulgaris, seborrhea, or female- or male-pattern alopecia. Other causes of androgen overproduction are infrequent ( , ). NCCAH, the most common of these disorders, is present in 4.2 (...) . The task force commissioned two systematic reviews and used the best available evidence from other published systematic reviews and individual studies. Consensus Process Group meetings, conference calls, and e-mail communications facilitated consensus development. Endocrine Society committees, members, and cosponsoring organizations reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of the guidelines. Conclusion We suggest testing for elevated androgen levels in all women with an abnormal hirsutism score. We

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2018 The Endocrine Society

175. Recommendations from the international evidence-based guideline for the assessment and management of polycystic ovary syndrome

hyperandrogenismneedtobe considered. Historyofsymptomonsetandprogressionis criticalin assessing for neoplasia, however, some androgen-secreting neoplasms may only induce mild to moderate increases in biochemical hyperandrogenism. _ Clinicalhyperandrogenism CCR A comprehensive history and physical examination should be completed for symptoms and signs of clinical hyperandrogenism, including acne, alopecia, and hirsutism and, in adolescents, severe acne and hirsutism. **** CCR Health professionals should be aware (...) In combination with the COCP, antiandrogens could be considered for the treatment of androgen- related alopecia in PCOS. ** CPP In PCOS, antiandrogens must be used with effective contraception, to avoid male foetal undervirilisation.Variableavailabilityandregulatorystatusoftheseagentsisnotableandforsome agents, potential liver toxicity requires caution. _ Metformin EBR Metformin in addition to lifestyle, could be recommended in adult women with PCOS, for the treatment of weight, hormonal, and metabolic

2018 Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology

176. European Society of Endocrinology Clinical Practice Guidelines on the management of adrenocortical carcinoma in adults

. An increasing number of cases are diagnosed within the group of incidentally discovered adrenal masses (incidentalomas) (≈ 10–15%). However, the likelihood of an adrenal incidentaloma being an ACC is low ( , , ). About 50–60% of patients with ACC have clinical hormone excess. Hypercortisolism (Cushing syndrome) or mixed Cushing and virilizing syndromes are observed in the majority of these patients. Pure androgen excess is less frequent while estrogen or mineralocorticoid excess are very rare (...) ( , , , , , ). Non-specific symptoms from an abdominal mass include abdominal discomfort (nausea, vomiting, abdominal fullness) or back pain. Classical malignancy-associated symptoms such as weight loss, night sweats, fatigue or fever are rarely present ( ). Table 1 Clinical presentation of ACC. # Autonomous adrenal hormone excess 50–60 Hypercortisolism (Cushing syndrome)* 50–70 Androgen excess (virilization) in female patients* 20–30 Estrogen excess (feminization) in male patients* 5 Mineralocorticoid excess* 2

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2018 European Society of Endocrinology

179. Interventions for female pattern hair loss. (PubMed)

Interventions for female pattern hair loss. Female pattern hair loss (FPHL), or androgenic alopecia, is the most common type of hair loss affecting women. It is characterised by progressive shortening of the duration of the growth phase of the hair with successive hair cycles, and progressive follicular miniaturisation with conversion of terminal to vellus hair follicles (terminal hairs are thicker and longer, while vellus hairs are soft, fine, and short). The frontal hair line may or may

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2016 Cochrane

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