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Androgenic Alopecia

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121. Study on Androgen Receptor and Triple Negative Breast Cancer

Study on Androgen Receptor and Triple Negative Breast Cancer Study on Androgen Receptor and Triple Negative Breast Cancer - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Study on Androgen Receptor (...) Information provided by (Responsible Party): UNICANCER Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: This is a multicenter uncontrolled, open-label, prospective, non-comparative randomized, phase II study. Patients will be randomized between darolutamide in Arm n°1 (two-stage Simon's design) and capecitabine in Arm n°2 with two patients randomized in Arm n°1 for one patient randomized in Arm n°2. The trial population is composed of women over 18 years old with triple-negative and androgen receptor

2017 Clinical Trials

122. Dose Escalation and Dose Expansion Study of GSK525762 in Combination With Androgen Deprivation Therapy and Other Agents in Subjects With Castrate-resistant Prostate Cancer

Dose Escalation and Dose Expansion Study of GSK525762 in Combination With Androgen Deprivation Therapy and Other Agents in Subjects With Castrate-resistant Prostate Cancer Dose Escalation and Dose Expansion Study of GSK525762 in Combination With Androgen Deprivation Therapy and Other Agents in Subjects With Castrate-resistant Prostate Cancer - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search (...) for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Dose Escalation and Dose Expansion Study of GSK525762 in Combination With Androgen Deprivation Therapy and Other Agents in Subjects With Castrate-resistant Prostate Cancer The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has

2017 Clinical Trials

123. A Study to Evaluate the Superiority, Efficacy and Tolerability of Combination Pantovigar With 2% Minoxidil vs 2% Minoxidil in Women With Female Pattern Hair Loss

of hormone therapy within 6 months prior to entering study Hormone therapy with androgenic action, e.g. norethisterone etc. Pregnancy or lactation within 6 months prior to entering study Alopecia areata Scarring alopecia Treatment with hair promoting agent within 3 months prior to entering study Known hair loss after drug intake Concomitant use of the drugs causing a hair loss (e.g. aromatase inhibitors, thyreostatics, cytostatics, etc,) Contacts and Locations Go to Information from the National Library (...) as for the treatment of damaged hair, in the combined therapy can be successfully applied in other types of alopecia. The purpose of this study is to evaluate efficacy and tolerability of combination therapy Pantovigar plus 2% minoxidil vs 2% minoxidil. To collect tolerability data for combined treatment Pantovigar plus 2% Minoxidil course therapy. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Female Pattern Hair Loss Androgenetic Alopecia (AGA) Ludwig Type 1 Ludwig Type 2 Drug: Pantovigar Drug: Minoxidil 2

2013 Clinical Trials

124. Androgen Replacement in Women

libido and sexual satisfaction Improves sense of well-being Appears to improve concentration and memory VII. Adverse Effects abnormalities (associated with oral androgens) tumors Cholestatic Iatrogenic Irreversible effects (Male patterned baldness) Voice deepening Clitoromegaly Reversible effects and oily skin (facial hair) Adverse effect on lipid profile Increases Decreases VIII. Causes: Secondary Causes of Hypoandrogenism Hypopituitarism Oophorectomy Secondary Medications lowering androgen levels (...) Androgen Replacement in Women Androgen Replacement in Women Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Androgen Replacement

2018 FP Notebook

125. Factors associated with female pattern hair loss and its prevalence in Taiwanese women: A community-based survey. (Abstract)

Factors associated with female pattern hair loss and its prevalence in Taiwanese women: A community-based survey. Although female pattern hair loss (FPHL) has been considered simply the female counterpart of male pattern hair loss in men, the risk factors may differ.We sought to evaluate factors associated with FPHL and to estimate its prevalence in women.In total, 26,226 subjects aged 30 years and older participated in a cross-sectional survey. Ludwig and Norwood classifications were used (...) to assess the degree of hair loss. Information on possible risk factors for FPHL was collected using a questionnaire interview.The prevalence of FPHL (Ludwig grade >I) for all ages was 11.8% (95% CI 11.5%-12.2%), increasing with advancing age. After controlling for age and family history, statistically significant associations were noted between FPHL and high fasting glucose (odds ratio [OR] 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.28), fewer childbirths (OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.12-1.38), breast-feeding

2012 Journal of American Academy of Dermatology

126. Selected variants of the steroid-5-alpha-reductase isoforms SRD5A1 and SRD5A2 and the sex steroid hormone receptors ESR1, ESR2 and PGR: No association with female pattern hair loss identified. (Abstract)

Selected variants of the steroid-5-alpha-reductase isoforms SRD5A1 and SRD5A2 and the sex steroid hormone receptors ESR1, ESR2 and PGR: No association with female pattern hair loss identified. Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is a common disorder with a complex mode of inheritance. Although understanding of its etiopathogenesis is incomplete, an interaction between genetic and hormonal factors is assumed to be important. The involvement of an androgen-dependent pathway and sex steroid hormones

2012 Experimental Dermatology

127. A Comparison of the Hormonal Profile of Early Androgenetic Alopecia in Men With the Phenotypic Equivalent of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Women. Full Text available with Trip Pro

A Comparison of the Hormonal Profile of Early Androgenetic Alopecia in Men With the Phenotypic Equivalent of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Women. Early androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is patterned hair loss occurring before age 30 years. Early AGA in men is frequently reported as the phenotypic equivalent of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) in women, which carries the risk of developing obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular diseases. Very few studies have been conducted to evaluate (...) . Men who had any established endocrine disorder, diabetes mellitus, or cardiovascular disease and those who took any oral medication or hormonal treatment for hair loss were excluded from the study. The serum concentrations of total testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), prolactin, fasting plasma glucose, and insulin levels were measured. Insulin resistance (IR) and free androgen index

2016 JAMA dermatology (Chicago, Ill.)

128. Androgenetic Alopecia. Modelling Progression and regrowth. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Hair Follicle Humans androgenic balding female pattern baldness male 2016 03 29 2016 4 11 6 0 2016 4 12 6 0 2018 2 1 6 0 ppublish 27061176 10.1111/exd.13029 (...) Androgenetic Alopecia. Modelling Progression and regrowth. 27061176 2018 01 31 2018 01 31 1600-0625 25 6 2016 06 Experimental dermatology Exp. Dermatol. Androgenetic alopecia. Modelling progression and regrowth. 424-5 10.1111/exd.13029 Sinclair Rodney R Department of Dermatology, University of Melbourne, Epworth Hospital, Melbourne, Vic., Australia. eng Journal Article Comment Denmark Exp Dermatol 9301549 0906-6705 IM Exp Dermatol. 2016 Jun;25(6):482-4 26782302 Alopecia Disease Progression Hair

2016 Experimental Dermatology

129. Factors affecting the severity of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia. (Abstract)

Factors affecting the severity of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is a type of scarring hair loss primarily seen in African-American women. The risk factors that affect the severity of disease remain unclear.This study was designed to elucidate risk factors that may be associated with severity of CCCA.A cross-sectional survey study was conducted. Women with biopsy-confirmed CCCA responded to a questionnaire and were grouped according (...) was noted in 16 subjects (42.1%). The average duration of hair loss was 5.7 years in early-stage disease and 10.1 years in advanced-stage disease. There was a positive correlation between duration of hair loss and degree of hair loss (Spearman's correlation 0.471, P = 0.003).This study reports on data sourced from patients with biopsy-confirmed CCCA and examines the relationships between various factors and severity of CCCA. The findings demonstrate that duration of hair loss is positively associated

2016 International Journal of Dermatology

130. Hunting the genes in male pattern alopecia: How important are they, how close are we, and what will they tell us? Full Text available with Trip Pro

Hunting the genes in male pattern alopecia: How important are they, how close are we, and what will they tell us? Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a highly heritable condition, and the most common form of hair loss in men. The phenotype is characterized by an androgen-dependent, progressive loss of hair from the scalp, which may commence during puberty. Up to 80% of European men experience some degree of androgen-dependent hair loss during their lifetime. Current treatment options for AGA have (...) limited efficacy, and improved understanding of the underlying biological causes is required to facilitate novel therapeutic approaches. To date, molecular genetic studies have implicated 12 genomic regions in AGA and identified a number of candidate genes. The latter include those encoding the androgen receptor (AR), the histone deacetylases (HDAC) 4 and 9, and the WNT molecule WNT10A. However, the majority of contributing genetic risk factors still await identification. This review describes

2016 Experimental Dermatology

131. Safety and Tolerability of the Dual 5-Alpha Reductase Inhibitor Dutasteride in the Treatment of Androgenetic Alopecia Full Text available with Trip Pro

Safety and Tolerability of the Dual 5-Alpha Reductase Inhibitor Dutasteride in the Treatment of Androgenetic Alopecia After the approval of dutastride for androgenic alopecia (AGA) in 2009, Korean authority required a post-marketing surveillance to obtain further data on its safety profile.The objective was to monitor adverse events (AEs) of dutasteride 0.5 mg in Korean AGA male patients in a clinical practice environment.Open label, multi-center, non-interventional observational study was done

2016 Annals of dermatology

132. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Bimatoprost in Men With Androgenetic Alopecia (AGA)

about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Layout table for eligibility information Ages Eligible for Study: 18 Years to 49 Years (Adult) Sexes Eligible for Study: Male Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No Criteria Inclusion Criteria: Mild to moderate male pattern baldness (androgenic alopecia) with ongoing hair loss for at least 1 year Exclusion Criteria: History (...) Sponsor: Allergan Information provided by (Responsible Party): Allergan Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: This is a safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics study of bimatoprost in male patients with androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Alopecia Alopecia, Androgenetic Baldness Drug: Bimatoprost Phase 1 Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Actual Enrollment : 53 participants

2016 Clinical Trials

133. STYLE -- A Trial of Cell Enriched Adipose For Androgenetic Alopecia

: Other Study ID Numbers: 003-A-II First Posted: July 21, 2015 Last Update Posted: March 7, 2018 Last Verified: March 2018 Keywords provided by Kerastem Technologies, LLC: Female Pattern Baldness Male Pattern Baldness Genetic Alopecia Androgenic Alopecia Hair Loss Additional relevant MeSH terms: Layout table for MeSH terms Alopecia Alopecia Areata Hypotrichosis Hair Diseases Skin Diseases Pathological Conditions, Anatomical (...) information, Layout table for eligibility information Ages Eligible for Study: 18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult) Sexes Eligible for Study: All Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No Criteria Inclusion Criteria: Males with a diagnosis of Alopecia Androgenetica Females with a diagnosis of Alopecia Androgenetica Males with hair loss consistent with Grades III, IIIA, III-Vertex, IV, IV-A, based on Norwood-Hamilton Scale (Figure 1) Females with hair loss consistent with Grades I-3, I-4, II-1, II-2 based

2015 Clinical Trials

134. A Study of SM04554 Applied Topically to the Scalp of Male Subjects With Androgenetic Alopecia Analyzed by Biopsy of the Scalp Prior To and Post Dosing

conditioner is optional for subjects who do not use conditioner Exclusion Criteria: Clinical diagnosis of alopecia areata or other non-AGA forms of alopecia Scalp hair loss on the treatment area, due to disease, injury, or medical therapy Males who are sexually active and have a partner who is capable of becoming pregnant, neither of whom have had surgery to become sterilized, that are not using a highly effective method of birth control and are not willing to use a highly effective method of birth (...) cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma) located anywhere on the body History of surgical correction of hair loss on the scalp Previous exposure to SM04554 Use of blood thinners (e.g., Coumadin, Plavix, Lovenox, and aspirin >81mg); low dose aspirin (e.g., ≤81 mg) is allowable Use of any products or devices clinically proven to promote scalp hair growth (e.g., finasteride or minoxidil) within 24 weeks prior to study start Use of anti-androgenic therapies (e.g., spironolactone, flutamide, cyproterone

2015 Clinical Trials

135. Adipose-derived SVF for Treatment of Alopecia

subject. Stromal Vascular Fraction (SVF) will be disassociated within the GID SVF-2 from the autologous adipose tissue to be injected into a small (approximately 2x2cm) area of the scalp in men or women with androgenic alopecia. Device: GID SVF-2 Comparison of the number of hairs before and after treatment of autologous adipose-derived SVF as a percentage increase or decrease in growth. Outcome Measures Go to Primary Outcome Measures : Incidence of Treatment-emergent Adverse Events (Safety) [ Time (...) : Treatment Official Title: Adipose-derived Stromal Vascular Fraction (SVF) Injections to Stimulate Hair Regrowth for Androgenetic Alopecia Actual Study Start Date : July 20, 2016 Actual Primary Completion Date : January 22, 2017 Actual Study Completion Date : January 22, 2017 Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine related topics: Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment Experimental: SVF Injection Liposuction of a small amount of adipose tissue will be taken from each

2015 Clinical Trials

136. LEO 124249 Ointment in the Treatment of Alopecia Areata

) investigator, affecting a minimum of 30% scalp area at Visit 1 (Screening) and Visit 2 (Day 1, baseline). Minimum 6 month duration of hair loss at Visit 1 (Screening). No upper limit time limit. Subject must accept to not cut hair in the treated scalp areas during the trial. Exclusion Criteria: Females who are pregnant or are breast feeding. Current signs of spontaneous hair regrowth. Diffuse type alopecia areata. Co-existing moderate to severe androgenic alopecia (Norwood-Hamilton stage IV-VI and Ludwig (...) : This clinical trial attempts to investigate the efficacy and safety of LEO 124249 ointment in the treatment of alopecia areata and the molecular disease mechanism and biomarkers. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Alopecia Areata Drug: LEO 124249 Other: Vehicle Phase 2 Detailed Description: The objectives of this clinical trial are to compare the efficacy of twice-daily topical LEO 124249 30 mg/g ointment with LEO 124249 ointment vehicle for 12 weeks in the treatment of hair loss in subjects

2015 Clinical Trials

137. Conditions simulating androgenetic alopecia. (Abstract)

Conditions simulating androgenetic alopecia. Androgenetic alopecia is a common form of hair loss, characterized by a progressive hair follicular miniaturization, caused by androgen hormones on a genetically susceptible hair follicle, in androgenic-dependent areas. Characteristic phenotype of androgenetic alopecia is also observed in many other hair disorders. These disorders are androgenetic-like diseases that cause many differential diagnosis or therapeutic error problems. The objective

2015 Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology

138. The association of androgenetic alopecia and insulin resistance is independent of hyperandrogenemia: A case-control study. (Abstract)

The association of androgenetic alopecia and insulin resistance is independent of hyperandrogenemia: A case-control study. Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) occurs due to the effect of androgens and genetic predisposition. The association between hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance (IR) has been clearly documented. In recent years there have been reports supporting the presence of IR in AGA. The study aimed to investigate the presence of IR in women with AGA and discern whether

2015 Australasian Journal of Dermatology

139. Role of genetics and sex steroid hormones in male androgenetic alopecia and female pattern hair loss: An update of what we now know. (Abstract)

Role of genetics and sex steroid hormones in male androgenetic alopecia and female pattern hair loss: An update of what we now know. The role of genetic predisposition and the influence of sex steroid hormones are indisputable to the pathogenesis of male androgenetic alopecia (MAGA). The role of sex steroid hormones in female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is less known. A good knowledge of the pathophysiology underlying MAGA and FPHL empowers the clinician to confidently counsel patients and make (...) informed therapeutic decisions. Vigorous research in recent years has provided greater insight into the role of genetics and sex steroids in physiological hair growth and cycling, as well as in hair follicle miniaturization, the histological hallmark of MAGA and FPHL. In the present review article directed towards clinicians, we discuss the current understanding of the role of androgens and oestrogens, as well as genetic associations with MAGA and FPHL. We also briefly discuss the interpretation

2011 Australasian Journal of Dermatology

140. Androgen excess: Investigations and management. (Abstract)

Androgen excess: Investigations and management. Androgen excess (AE) is a key feature of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and results in, or contributes to, the clinical phenotype of these patients. Although AE will contribute to the ovulatory and menstrual dysfunction of these patients, the most recognizable sign of AE includes hirsutism, acne, and androgenic alopecia or female pattern hair loss (FPHL). Evaluation includes not only scoring facial and body terminal hair growth using (...) the modified Ferriman-Gallwey method but also recording and possibly scoring acne and alopecia. Moreover, assessment of biochemical hyperandrogenism is necessary, particularly in patients with unclear or absent hirsutism, and will include assessing total and free testosterone (T), and possibly dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) and androstenedione, although these latter contribute limitedly to the diagnosis. Assessment of T requires use of the highest quality assays available, generally

2016 Best practice & research. Clinical obstetrics & gynaecology

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