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Androgenic Alopecia

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1. Serum androgens and PSA levels in androgenetic alopecia - is there a difference between frontal and vertex baldness? (Abstract)

Serum androgens and PSA levels in androgenetic alopecia - is there a difference between frontal and vertex baldness? Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) seems to be a marker of increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa).We sought to investigate potential pathophysiological differences between frontal and vertex balding that might have the impact on the incidence of PCa.Serum concentrations of testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were measured in 88 subjects (...) was found between the serum PSA level and serum androgen levels as well as DHT/T ratio.Vertex baldness may signal higher exposures to circulating DHT. Serum PSA level cannot serve as surrogate diagnostic marker of increased androgenic activity in men with AGA.© 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

2017 Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology

2. Comprehensive Transcriptome Profiling of Balding and Non-Balding Scalps in Trichorhinophalangeal Syndrome Type I Patient Full Text available with Trip Pro

Comprehensive Transcriptome Profiling of Balding and Non-Balding Scalps in Trichorhinophalangeal Syndrome Type I Patient Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS) patients tend to have alopecia that appears to be androgenetic, and this genetic model might give clues to the pathogenesis of hair loss or hair morphogenesis.This study was conducted to identify additional genetic evidence of TRPS and hair morphogenesis from a TRPS patient.From one TRPS type I patient, we extracted RNA and profiled whole (...) transcriptome in non-balding and balding scalp areas using high-throughput RNA sequencing.We found a total of 26,320 genes, which comprised 14,892 known genes with new isoforms and 4,883 novel genes from the non-balding and balding areas. Among these, a total of 1,242 genes showed different expression in the two scalp areas (p<0.05 and log2 fold-change >0). Several genes related to the skin and hair, alopecia, and the TRPS1 gene were validated by qRT-PCR. Twelve of 15 genes (KRT6C, KRTAP3-1, MKI67, GPRC5D

2017 Annals of dermatology

3. Drugs for male- and female-pattern baldness: Just a hair bit more effective than doing nothing?

care research. www.acfp.ca October 11, 2016 Drugs for male- and female-pattern baldness: Just a hair bit more effective than doing nothing? Clinical Question: What is the effect of approved medications for androgenic alopecia in men and women? Bottom-line: For men using finasteride or minoxidil, one in 4-8 more than placebo will notice at least slight improvement in hair count over 6-12 months, with no clear evidence one is better. For every 84 men taking finasteride for hair loss, one extra (...) outcome. o Minoxidil 1-5% versus placebo: ? Patient-rated moderate improvement or better (26% versus 14%, NNT=8) ? Increase in hair count, +13 hairs/cm 2 , at 6-12 months. Context: • Prevalence of androgenic alopecia increases with age, with approximately ½ of men and ? of women balding after age 70. 10 • Numerous other interventions (like nutritional supplements or Handi-Dome Comb) have low quality evidence with inconsistent results. 9,11 • Only minoxidil for women or men, and finasteride for men

2016 Tools for Practice

4. Differential expression between human dermal papilla cells from balding and non-balding scalps reveals new candidate genes for androgenetic alopecia. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Differential expression between human dermal papilla cells from balding and non-balding scalps reveals new candidate genes for androgenetic alopecia. Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a common heritable and androgen-dependent hair loss condition in men. Twelve genetic risk loci are known to date, but it is unclear which genes at these loci are relevant for AGA. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) located in the hair bulb are the main site of androgen activity in the hair follicle. Widely used monolayer (...) -cultured primary DPCs in hair-related studies often lack dermal papilla characteristics. In contrast, immortalized DPCs have high resemblance to intact dermal papilla. We derived immortalized human DPC lines from balding (BAB) and non-balding (BAN) scalp. Both BAB and BAN retained high proportions of dermal papilla signature gene and versican protein expression. We performed expression analysis of BAB and BAN and annotated AGA risk loci with differentially expressed genes. We found evidence for AR

2016 Journal of Investigative Dermatology

5. Circulating and intraprostatic sex steroid hormonal profiles in relation to male pattern baldness and chest hair density among men diagnosed with localized prostate cancers. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Circulating and intraprostatic sex steroid hormonal profiles in relation to male pattern baldness and chest hair density among men diagnosed with localized prostate cancers. Prospective cohort studies of circulating sex steroid hormones and prostate cancer risk have not provided a consistent association, despite evidence from animal and clinical studies. However, studies using male pattern baldness as a proxy of early-life or cumulative androgen exposure have reported significant associations (...) with aggressive and fatal prostate cancer risk. Given that androgens underlie the development of patterned hair loss and chest hair, we assessed whether these two dermatological characteristics were associated with circulating and intraprostatic concentrations of sex steroid hormones among men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer.We included 248 prostate cancer patients from the NCI Prostate Tissue Study, who answered surveys and provided a pre-treatment blood sample as well as fresh frozen adjacent

2017 Prostate

6. Androgenic alopecia

Androgenic alopecia Androgenic alopecia - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Androgenic alopecia Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2018 Summary Also known as pattern baldness, androgenic alopecia is a genetically determined, patterned, progressive loss of hair from the scalp and occurs in both men and women. Both androgens and genetics play a role in its pathogenesis. The term androgenic (...) alopecia is best used only when referring to male-pattern hair loss, as most females likely do not share the androgenic pathway. A more appropriate term for women is female-pattern hair loss. The term pattern hair loss will be used when referring to hair loss affecting both sexes. Men present with hair thinning in the temporal areas that advances to the crown (vertex) area as the alopecia progresses. Women usually have more diffuse thinning on the crown area, and less commonly present with a male-type

2018 BMJ Best Practice

7. FEMALE PATTERN HAIR LOSS AND ANDROGEN EXCESS: A REPORT FROM THE MULTIDISCIPLINARY ANDROGEN EXCESS AND PCOS COMMITTEE. (Abstract)

terms of alopecia or androgenetic alopecia. 2.The two typical patterns of hair loss in FPHL are centrifugal expansion in mid scalp or a frontal accentuation or Christmas tree pattern. 3. Isolated FPHL should not be considered a sign of hyperandrogenism when androgen levels are normal 4. The assessment of patients with FPHL is primarily clinical. 5. In all patients with FPHL, assessment of a possible androgen excess is mandatory. Measurement of vitamin D, iron studies, zinc, thyroid hormones (...) FEMALE PATTERN HAIR LOSS AND ANDROGEN EXCESS: A REPORT FROM THE MULTIDISCIPLINARY ANDROGEN EXCESS AND PCOS COMMITTEE. To determine the current state of knowledge and provide evidence-based recommendations that could be valid for all specialists taking care of female pattern hair loss (FPHL), a common form of hair loss in women that is characterized by the reduction of hair density in the central area of the scalp, while the frontal hairline is generally well conserved.An expert task force

2019 Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

8. Male Pattern Baldness in Relation to Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality: A Prospective Analysis in the NHANES I Epidemiologic Follow-up Study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Male Pattern Baldness in Relation to Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality: A Prospective Analysis in the NHANES I Epidemiologic Follow-up Study. We used male pattern baldness as a proxy for long-term androgen exposure and investigated the association of dermatologist-assessed hair loss with prostate cancer-specific mortality in the first National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Epidemiologic Follow-up Study. From the baseline survey (1971-1974), we included 4,316 men who were 25-74 years (...) with no balding, any baldness was associated with a 56% higher risk of fatal prostate cancer (hazard ratio = 1.56; 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 2.37), and moderate balding specifically was associated with an 83% higher risk (hazard ratio = 1.83; 95% confidence interval: 1.15, 2.92). Conversely, patterned hair loss was not statistically significantly associated with all-cause mortality. Our analysis suggests that patterned hair loss is associated with a higher risk of fatal prostate cancer and supports

2016 American Journal of Epidemiology

9. Male pattern baldness and risk of colorectal neoplasia. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Male pattern baldness and risk of colorectal neoplasia. Male pattern baldness is positively associated with androgens as well as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin, all of which are implicated in pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia.From 1992 through 2010, we prospectively followed participants in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. Hair pattern at age 45 years was assessed at baseline with five image categories (no baldness, frontal-only baldness, frontal-plus-mild-vertex (...) baldness, frontal-plus-moderate-vertex baldness, and frontal-plus-severe-vertex baldness). Cancer analysis included 32 782 men and used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Restricted to men who underwent at least one endoscopy over the study period, adenoma analysis included 29 770 men and used logistic regressions for clustered data to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs.Over the mean follow-up of 15.6 years, 710 cases of colorectal

2016 British Journal of Cancer

10. The association of male pattern baldness and risk of cancer and high-grade disease among men presenting for prostate biopsy Full Text available with Trip Pro

The association of male pattern baldness and risk of cancer and high-grade disease among men presenting for prostate biopsy Androgens have been implicated in both male pattern baldness (MPB) and prostate cancer (PCa). We set out to prospectively determine if men with independently assessed MPB are at higher risk for PCa at biopsy and determine if any grade associations exist.We prospectively enrolled 394 eligible patients presenting for prostate biopsy and independently determined their MPB (...) pattern using the validated modified Norwood classification system (0: no balding; 1: frontal balding; 2: mild vertex balding; 3: moderate vertex balding; 4: sever vertex balding). Univariate and multivariable models, including Norwood score, age, prostate-specific antigen, and digital rectal examination abnormalities, were calculated for the outcomes of cancer and high-grade disease (Gleason >6). C-statistics analyses of our models were then compared with and without MPB pattern for marginal

2016 Canadian Urological Association Journal

11. Minoxidil 5% / Botanical Hair Regimen in Men With Thinning Hair and Male Pattern Hair Loss/Androgenic Alopecia

Minoxidil 5% / Botanical Hair Regimen in Men With Thinning Hair and Male Pattern Hair Loss/Androgenic Alopecia Minoxidil 5% / Botanical Hair Regimen in Men With Thinning Hair and Male Pattern Hair Loss/Androgenic Alopecia - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved (...) studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Minoxidil 5% / Botanical Hair Regimen in Men With Thinning Hair and Male Pattern Hair Loss/Androgenic Alopecia The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02460289 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : June 2, 2015 Last

2015 Clinical Trials

12. Minoxidil 2% Solution and Botanical Hair Regimen in Women With Thinning Hair and Female Pattern Hair Loss/Androgenic Alopecia

Minoxidil 2% Solution and Botanical Hair Regimen in Women With Thinning Hair and Female Pattern Hair Loss/Androgenic Alopecia Minoxidil 2% Solution and Botanical Hair Regimen in Women With Thinning Hair and Female Pattern Hair Loss/Androgenic Alopecia - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached (...) the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Minoxidil 2% Solution and Botanical Hair Regimen in Women With Thinning Hair and Female Pattern Hair Loss/Androgenic Alopecia The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02460497 Recruitment Status

2015 Clinical Trials

13. Investigation of the male pattern baldness major genetic susceptibility loci AR/EDA2R and 20p11 in female pattern hair loss. (Abstract)

Investigation of the male pattern baldness major genetic susceptibility loci AR/EDA2R and 20p11 in female pattern hair loss. The aetiology of female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is largely unknown. However, it is hypothesized that FPHL and male pattern baldness (AGA) share common susceptibility alleles. The two major susceptibility loci for AGA are the androgen receptor (AR)/ectodysplasin A2 receptor (EDA2R) locus on the X-chromosome, and a locus on chromosome 20p11, for which no candidate gene has

2012 British Journal of Dermatology

14. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Protects CD200-Rich and CD34-Positive Hair Follicle Stem Cells Against Androgen-Induced Apoptosis Through the Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase/Akt Pathway in Patients With Androgenic Alopecia. (Abstract)

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Protects CD200-Rich and CD34-Positive Hair Follicle Stem Cells Against Androgen-Induced Apoptosis Through the Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase/Akt Pathway in Patients With Androgenic Alopecia. 5α-DHT can decrease the cell viability of the hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) with CD34-positive and CD200-rich in bald scalp area of androgenic alopecia (AGA) patients and the apoptosis of HFSCs may be involved in the pathogenesis of AGA. The expression of Vascular (...) endothelial growth factor (VEGF) turns to be weakened or disappeared in hair follicles of AGA patients.To investigate whether VEGF is involved in the apoptosis of HFSCs induced by 5α-DHT in the patients of AGA.By 5α-DHT, apoptosis of CD200-rich and CD34-positive HFSCs was induced and apoptotic rates up to 24 hours were assessed using flow cytometry. The expression grades of Bcl-2, Akt, caspase-3 and Bax were observed through Western blot analysis.Vascular endothelial growth factor could cut 5α-DHT induced

2019 Dermatologic Surgery

15. Serum Levels of Androgen-Associated Hormones Are Correlated with Curative Effect in Androgenic Alopecia in Young Men Full Text available with Trip Pro

Serum Levels of Androgen-Associated Hormones Are Correlated with Curative Effect in Androgenic Alopecia in Young Men BACKGROUND Androgenic alopecia (AGA) is the most common type of hair loss in men. However, the pathogenesis is not yet fully understood and therapeutic approaches are limited. This retrospective study investigated the association between levels of androgen-associated hormones and curative effect in androgenic alopecia in young male AGA patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS By using (...) -stimulating hormone (FSH) were similar in the 2 groups. There were no significant differences in serum androgen levels, including DHT and FT, among AGA patients with different grades of hair loss severity (p>0.05). After finasteride therapy, the levels of DHT decreased significantly (p<0.05). Increased serum levels of LSH or LH were also observed in 55 patients after therapy (p<0.05). The levels of SHGB did not change significantly after therapy (p>0.05). Patients with lower levels of serum FT and DHT

2018 Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research

16. How Do You Advise the Balding Patient?

alopecia. The gold standard for the diagnosis of AGA is scalp biopsy, though this invasive procedure is rarely required.3 In men, the diagnosis of AGA is often easy: the hair loss is characterized by an em-shaped balding pattern, variably thinning strands, and the presence of vellus-like hair in place of terminal strands. In women not suffering from androgen excess, AGA is diagnosed in those presenting with diffuse thinning over the frontal region; the stereotypical male frontotemporal balding pattern (...) with good occipital-parietal hair density. Given the myriad options, it is essential that the internist be able to offer advice and assist the balding patient in making an informed decision. Male pattern hair loss is medically referred to as androgenetic alopecia (AGA). At initial presentation, it is important to differentiate between AGA and other causes of hair loss. As with any condition, the past medical history can yield clues. Febrile infections, major surgery requiring general anesthesia, cancer

2010 Clinical Correlations

17. A Randomized, Controlled Pilot Trial Comparing Platelet-Rich Plasma to Topical Minoxidil Foam for Treatment of Androgenic Alopecia in Women. (Abstract)

A Randomized, Controlled Pilot Trial Comparing Platelet-Rich Plasma to Topical Minoxidil Foam for Treatment of Androgenic Alopecia in Women. Androgenic alopecia (AGA) is a common hair loss disorder. Studies have demonstrated successful treatment with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in men, but studies in women are few.To evaluate PRP in the treatment of AGA in women, compared with topical minoxidil.Twenty women with AGA received topical minoxidil for 12 weeks and injectable PRP for 12 weeks (...) in a randomized crossover design with an 8-week washout between treatments. Standardized TrichoScan analysis and quality-of-life questionnaires were assessed at baseline and 12-week follow-up for each treatment.After PRP, significant increases from baseline to Week 12 in TrichoScan analysis hair count (p = .002) and vellus hair density (p = .009) occurred. However, minoxidil resulted in significant increases in hair count (p < .001), vellus hair density (p = .03), terminal hair density (p = .004

2019 Dermatologic Surgery

18. Herbal Medicines For Treatment of Androgenic Alopecia. (Abstract)

Herbal Medicines For Treatment of Androgenic Alopecia. Androgenic alopecia is a common and unpleasant problem that directly influences the self-confidence and individual life quality. There are various treatment choices that currently are used by people suffering from androgenic alopecia. Drug therapies (e. g. minoxidil, finasteride, dutasteride, prostaglandin analogues, ketoconazole, Cyproterone acetate and spironolactone), Laser-light treatment, surgical treatment, cell mediated treatment (...) and alternative treatments (vitamin, mineral and herbal components) are common therapeutic methods suggested for management of androgenic alopecia. Herbal medicines are now commonly used all over the world and this has increased global demand. Quality, safety and efficacy of these drugs have become a serious concern.The aim of this review is evaluating the herbal or fungal medicines were used in androgenic alopecia and introducing the phytochemicals, biological effects, responsible constituents

2019 Alternative Therapies in Health & Medicine

19. Comparative Study between Mesotherapy and Topical 5% Minoxidil by Dermoscopic Evaluation for Androgenic Alopecia in Male: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Comparative Study between Mesotherapy and Topical 5% Minoxidil by Dermoscopic Evaluation for Androgenic Alopecia in Male: A Randomized Controlled Trial. This study aims to compare efficacy and safety between mesotherapy (intralesional injection) and 5% topical minoxidil solution in male androgenic alopecia (AGA) by dermoscopic evaluation.In a randomized active controlled trial, we enrolled 49 clinically diagnosed males of AGA and randomly allotted them into two groups - mesotherapy (A) (25 (...) of hair shaft diameter, follicular units with single and multiple hairs, yellow dots, and perifollicular halo did not show any significant difference between the groups at all time points except at 1st month where the difference in variation of hair shaft diameter between the two group was 0.04. We observed a significant increase (P = 0.01) in the variation of hair shaft diameter between pre- and post-treatment in mesotherapy group compared to minoxidil group. The rest of parameters failed to show any

2019 International journal of trichology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

20. Finasteride and Androgenic Alopecia; from Therapeutic Options to Medical Implications. (Abstract)

Finasteride and Androgenic Alopecia; from Therapeutic Options to Medical Implications. Androgenic alopecia (AGA) is an esthetic condition with varying psycho-social implications, easily accepted by some patients and tolerated only with difficulty by others. Modern therapeutic options such as 5α-reductase inhibitors have significant outcomes, but also exert significant side effects in a subset of patients. The literature describes three distinct situations regarding finasteride administration

2019 Journal of Dermatological Treatment

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