How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

8,051 results for

Anaphylaxis

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Anaphylaxis

Anaphylaxis Anaphylaxis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Anaphylaxis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2019 Summary Sudden onset of respiratory or cardiovascular compromise, usually with a history of allergen exposure in sensitised individuals. Skin rash, wheezing and inspiratory stridor, hypotension, anxiety, nausea, and vomiting are the cardinal signs and symptoms. The diagnosis (...) is clinical. Allergy testing is helpful only for secondary prophylaxis. Securing the airway and initiating prompt treatment with epinephrine (adrenaline) may save lives. Comorbidities (e.g., coronary artery disease and COPD) may pose a treatment challenge and warrant expert consultation Definition Anaphylaxis is an acute, severe, life-threatening allergic reaction in pre-sensitised individuals, leading to a systemic response caused by the release of immune and inflammatory mediators from basophils

2019 BMJ Best Practice

3. Anaphylaxis

Anaphylaxis Anaphylaxis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Anaphylaxis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2019 Summary Sudden onset of respiratory or cardiovascular compromise, usually with a history of allergen exposure in sensitised individuals. Skin rash, wheezing and inspiratory stridor, hypotension, anxiety, nausea, and vomiting are the cardinal signs and symptoms. The diagnosis (...) is clinical. Allergy testing is helpful only for secondary prophylaxis. Securing the airway and initiating prompt treatment with epinephrine (adrenaline) may save lives. Comorbidities (e.g., coronary artery disease and COPD) may pose a treatment challenge and warrant expert consultation Definition Anaphylaxis is an acute, severe, life-threatening allergic reaction in pre-sensitised individuals, leading to a systemic response caused by the release of immune and inflammatory mediators from basophils

2018 BMJ Best Practice

4. CRACKCast E119 – Allergy, Hypersensitivity, Angioedema, and Anaphylaxis

CRACKCast E119 – Allergy, Hypersensitivity, Angioedema, and Anaphylaxis CRACKCast E119 – Allergy, Hypersensitivity, Angioedema, and Anaphylaxis - CanadiEM CRACKCast E119 – Allergy, Hypersensitivity, Angioedema, and Anaphylaxis In , by Chris Lipp October 19, 2017 This episode of CRACKCast covers Rosen’s Chapter 119 (109 in 9th), Allergy, Hypersensitivity, Angioedema, and Anaphylaxis. Patients suffering from acute allergic reactions, anaphylaxis, and angioedema are amongst the most unstable (...) , raised, and pruritic rash . Angioedema Another important syndrome, mediated by either an allergic (histaminergic) mechanism in response to exposure to foods, drugs, physical stimuli, or a non-allergic (non-histaminergic) mechanism (e.g., hereditary angioedema [HAE], or angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitor). Angioedema is characterized by edema of the subcutaneous or submucosal tissues, which can cause airway compromise if the tongue or larynx is involved. Anaphylaxis A life-threatening

2017 CandiEM

5. Factors increasing the risk for a severe reaction in anaphylaxis: An analysis of Data from The European Anaphylaxis Registry. (PubMed)

Factors increasing the risk for a severe reaction in anaphylaxis: An analysis of Data from The European Anaphylaxis Registry. Preventive measures to decrease the frequency and intensity of anaphylactic events are essential to provide optimal care for allergic patients. Aggravating factors may trigger or increase the severity of anaphylaxis and therefore need to be recognized and avoided.To identify and prioritize factors associated with an increased risk of developing severe anaphylaxis.Data (...) from the Anaphylaxis Registry (122 centers in 11 European countries) were used in logistic regression models considering existing severity grading systems, elicitors, and symptoms to identify the relative risk of factors on the severity of anaphylaxis.We identified higher age and concomitant mastocytosis (OR: 3.1, CI: 2.6-3.7) as the most important predictors for an increased risk of severe anaphylaxis. Vigorous physical exercise (OR: 1.5, CI: 1.3-1.7), male sex (OR: 1.2, CI: 1.1-1.3

2018 Allergy

6. Increasing trends of anaphylaxis-related events: an analysis of anaphylaxis using nationwide data in Taiwan, 2001–2013 (PubMed)

Increasing trends of anaphylaxis-related events: an analysis of anaphylaxis using nationwide data in Taiwan, 2001–2013 Anaphylaxis is a severe, potentially fatal, and systemic allergic reaction. Previous studies document increasing trends in incidence rates of anaphylaxis-related events in Western countries, yet little is known about the incidence and trend of anaphylaxis in Asia. In this study, we aimed to determine time trends in incidence rates of anaphylaxis-related events in Taiwan from (...) 2001 through 2013.We utilized medical claims data from the National Health Insurance Research Databases in Taiwan. We identified anaphylaxis-related events (ICD-9-CM-codes: 995.0, 995.60-995.69, 999.41-999.42, and 999.49) and calculated incidence rates. Poisson regression models were applied to examine trends and incidence rates.A total of 2496 patients (mean age, 45.11 years; 56% male) with first-time anaphylaxis were identified during 34,430,000 person-years of observation time. The overall

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 The World Allergy Organization journal

7. Anaphylaxis ? First Aid Management

Anaphylaxis ? First Aid Management ANZCOR Guideline 9.2.7 August 2016 Page 1 of 3 ANZCOR Guideline 9.2.7 – First Aid Management of Anaphylaxis Guideline Who does this guideline apply to? This guideline applies to adults, children and infant victims. Who is the audience for this guideline? This guideline is for use by bystanders, first aiders and first aid providers. 1 Introduction Anaphylaxis is the most severe form of allergic reaction and is potentially life threatening. It must be treated (...) as a medical emergency, requiring immediate treatment and urgent medical attention. Anaphylaxis is a generalised allergic reaction, which often involves more than one body system. A severe allergic reaction usually occurs within 20 minutes of exposure to the trigger. 1 Severe allergic reactions may occur without prior exposure to a trigger. It is characterised by rapidly developing airway and/or breathing and/or circulation problems usually associated with swelling, redness or itching of the skin, eyes

2016 Australian Resuscitation Council

8. Patterns of anaphylaxis after diagnostic work-up: a follow-up study of 226 patients with suspected anaphylaxis. (PubMed)

Patterns of anaphylaxis after diagnostic work-up: a follow-up study of 226 patients with suspected anaphylaxis. Most published studies on anaphylaxis are retrospective or register based. Data on subsequent diagnostic workup are sparse. We aimed to characterize patients seen with suspected anaphylaxis at the emergency care setting (ECS), after subsequent diagnostic workup at our Allergy Center (AC).Prospective study including patients from the ECS, Odense University Hospital, during May 2013 (...) -April 2014. Possible anaphylaxis cases were daily identified based on a broad search profile including history and symptoms in patient records, diagnostic codes and pharmacological treatments. At the AC, all patients were evaluated according to international guidelines.Among 226 patients with suspected anaphylaxis, the diagnosis was confirmed in 124 (54.9%) after diagnostic workup; 118 of the 124 fulfilled WAO/EAACI criteria of anaphylaxis at the ECS, while six were found among 46 patients

2017 Allergy

9. Fatal anaphylaxis in France: analysis of national anaphylaxis data, 1979-2011. (PubMed)

Fatal anaphylaxis in France: analysis of national anaphylaxis data, 1979-2011. 28283420 2017 08 07 1097-6825 140 2 2017 Aug The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. Fatal anaphylaxis in France: Analysis of national anaphylaxis data, 1979-2011. 610-612.e2 S0091-6749(17)30342-1 10.1016/j.jaci.2017.02.014 Pouessel Guillaume G Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, Roubaix, France; Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy Department, Pôle enfant, Hôpital Jeanne de

2017 Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

10. Food-induced anaphylaxis and cofactors – data from the anaphylaxis registry (PubMed)

Food-induced anaphylaxis and cofactors – data from the anaphylaxis registry Food allergens are frequent causes of anaphylaxis. In particular in children and adolescents they are the most frequent elicitors of severe allergic reactions, and in adults food allergens rank third behind insect venom and drugs. Since July 2006 severe allergic reactions from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland are collected in the anaphylaxis registry. Currently 78 hospitals and private practises are connected. From (...) the most frequent elicitor. In adults fruits (13.4%) most often induced severe food-dependent anaphylaxis, but also animal products (12.2%); among these most frequently crustaceans and molluscs. Cofactors were often suspected in food-dependent anaphylaxis, namely in 39% of the adult group and in 14% of the pediatric group. In adults drugs (22%) and physical activity (10%) were reported to be the most frequent cofactors, in children physical activity was suspected in 8.7% and drugs in 2.6%. Concomitant

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Allergologie Select

11. Fatal anaphylaxis registries data support changes in the who anaphylaxis mortality coding rules (PubMed)

Fatal anaphylaxis registries data support changes in the who anaphylaxis mortality coding rules Anaphylaxis is defined as a severe life-threatening generalized or systemic hypersensitivity reaction. The difficulty of coding anaphylaxis fatalities under the World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Diseases (ICD) system is recognized as an important reason for under-notification of anaphylaxis deaths. On current death certificates, a limited number of ICD codes are valid (...) as underlying causes of death, and death certificates do not include the word anaphylaxis per se. In this review, we provide evidences supporting the need for changes in WHO mortality coding rules and call for addition of anaphylaxis as an underlying cause of death on international death certificates. This publication will be included in support of a formal request to the WHO as a formal request for this move taking the 11th ICD revision.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Orphanet journal of rare diseases

12. Acute management of anaphylaxis guidelines

Acute management of anaphylaxis guidelines 1 ASCIA is the peak professional body of clinical immunology and allergy specialists in Australia and New Zealand - ABN: 45 615 521 452; ACN: 608 798 241 – www.allergy.org.au| © ASCIA 2016 Acute management of anaphylaxis These guidelines are intended for primary care physicians and nurses providing first responder emergency care. Anaphylaxis definition Any acute onset illness with typical skin features (urticarial rash or erythema/flushing (...) , and/or angioedema), PLUS involvement of respiratory and/or cardiovascular and/or persistent severe gastrointestinal symptoms. OR Any acute onset of hypotension or bronchospasm or upper airway obstruction where anaphylaxis is considered possible, even if typical skin features are not present. Signs and symptoms of allergic reactions Mild or moderate reactions • Swelling of lips, face, eyes • Hives or welts • Tingling mouth • Abdominal pain, vomiting (these are signs of anaphylaxis for insect allergy) Anaphylaxis

2016 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

13. Drug‐induced anaphylaxis in the emergency room (PubMed)

Drug‐induced anaphylaxis in the emergency room Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening, systemic allergic reaction that presents unique challenges for emergency care practitioners. Anaphylaxis occurs more frequently than previously believed. Therefore, proper knowledge regarding the epidemiology, mechanisms, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of anaphylaxis is essential. In particular, the initial treatment strategy, followed by correct diagnosis, in the emergency room is critical for preventing (...) fatal anaphylaxis, although making a diagnosis is not easy because of the broad and often atypical presentation of anaphylaxis. To this end, the clinical criteria proposed by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network are useful, which, together with a differential diagnosis, could enable a more accurate diagnosis. Additional in vitro tests, such as plasma histamine and tryptase measurements, are also helpful. It should be emphasized

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Acute medicine & surgery

14. Anaphylaxis: assessment and referral after emergency treatment

Anaphylaxis: assessment and referral after emergency treatment Anaph Anaphylaxis: assessment and referr ylaxis: assessment and referral al after emergency treatment after emergency treatment Clinical guideline Published: 14 December 2011 nice.org.uk/guidance/cg134 © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE (...) in this guideline should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with complying with those duties. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Anaphylaxis: assessment and referral after emergency treatment (CG134) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions

2011 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

15. Epidemiology of severe anaphylaxis: can we use population-based data to understand anaphylaxis? (PubMed)

Epidemiology of severe anaphylaxis: can we use population-based data to understand anaphylaxis? The observed increase in incidence of allergic disease in many regions over the past 3 decades has intensified interest in understanding the epidemiology of severe allergic reactions. We discuss the issues in collecting and interpreting these data and highlight current deficiencies in the current methods of data gathering.Anaphylaxis, as measured by hospital admission rates, is not uncommon and has (...) increased in the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, and Australia over the last 10-20 years. All large datasets are hampered by a large proportion of uncoded, 'unspecified' causes of anaphylaxis. Fatal anaphylaxis remains a rare event, but appears to be increasing for medication in Australia, Canada, and the United States. The rate of fatal food anaphylaxis is stable in the United Kingdom and the United States, but has increased in Australia. The age distribution for fatal food anaphylaxis

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology

16. Humanized mouse model of mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and passive systemic anaphylaxis. (PubMed)

Humanized mouse model of mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and passive systemic anaphylaxis. Mast cells are a critical component of allergic responses in humans, and animal models that allow the in vivo investigation of their contribution to allergy and evaluation of new human-specific therapeutics are urgently needed.To develop a new humanized mouse model that supports human mast cell engraftment and human IgE-dependent allergic responses.This model is based on the NOD-scid (...) and -independent manner, and can be readily cultured in vitro for additional studies. Intradermal priming of engrafted NSG-SGM3 mice with a chimeric IgE containing human constant regions resulted in the development of a robust passive cutaneous anaphylaxis response. Moreover, we describe the first report of a human mast cell antigen-dependent passive systemic anaphylaxis response in primed mice.NSG-SGM3 BLT mice provide a readily available source of human mast cells for investigation of mast cell biology

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

17. Anaphylaxis in children and adolescents: The European Anaphylaxis Registry. (PubMed)

Anaphylaxis in children and adolescents: The European Anaphylaxis Registry. Anaphylaxis in children and adolescents is a potentially life-threatening condition. Its heterogeneous clinical presentation and sudden occurrence in virtually any setting without warning have impeded a comprehensive description.We sought to characterize severe allergic reactions in terms of elicitors, symptoms, emergency treatment, and long-term management in European children and adolescents.The European Anaphylaxis (...) Registry recorded details of anaphylaxis after referral for in-depth diagnosis and counseling to 1 of 90 tertiary allergy centers in 10 European countries, aiming to oversample the most severe reactions. Data were retrieved from medical records by using a multilanguage online form.Between July 2007 and March 2015, anaphylaxis was identified in 1970 patients younger than 18 years. Most incidents occurred in private homes (46%) and outdoors (19%). One third of the patients had experienced anaphylaxis

2016 Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

18. Duration of Observation for Detecting a Biphasic Reaction in Anaphylaxis: A Meta-Analysis. (PubMed)

Duration of Observation for Detecting a Biphasic Reaction in Anaphylaxis: A Meta-Analysis. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine a practical observation time for detecting a biphasic reaction after resolution of the initial anaphylactic reaction.A systematic literature search identified studies on adult patients with anaphylaxis and a subsequent biphasic reaction due to various causes that contained sufficient data to extract outcomes. The outcomes were pooled using a random-effects (...) model.Twelve studies with a total of 2,890 adult patients with anaphylaxis and 143 patients with a biphasic reaction were included. In terms of the pooled negative predictive value, 1 h of observation achieved a 95.0% negative predictive value and ≥6 h of observation provided a 97.3% negative predictive value (95% CI: 95.0-98.5). The negative predictive value for a biphasic reaction increased with a longer observation time after initial anaphylaxis, and the increasing trend slowed down from 6 h

2019 International Archives of Allergy and Immunology

19. Epinephrine Administered for Anaphylaxis Unmasking a Type 1 Brugada Pattern on Electrocardiogram. (PubMed)

Epinephrine Administered for Anaphylaxis Unmasking a Type 1 Brugada Pattern on Electrocardiogram. Brugada pattern on electrocardiography (ECG) can manifest as type 1 (coved pattern) and type 2 (saddleback pattern). Brugada syndrome represents an ECG with Brugada pattern in a patient with symptoms or clinical factors, including syncope, cardiac arrest, ventricular dysrhythmias, and family history. Brugada syndrome is caused by a genetic channelopathy, but the Brugada pattern may be drug-induced (...) . Epinephrine-induced Brugada pattern has not been reported previously.A 63-year-old man developed anaphylaxis secondary to a bee sting, had a transient loss of consciousness, and self-administered intramuscular epinephrine. He subsequently presented to the emergency department and was found to have a type 1 Brugada pattern on ECG that resolved during observation. A historic ECG was reviewed that demonstrated a baseline type 2 Brugada pattern. His anaphylaxis was managed with steroids and antihistamines. He

2019 Journal of Emergency Medicine

20. Anaphylaxis to Carboxymethylcellulose: Add Food Additives to the List of Elicitors. (PubMed)

Anaphylaxis to Carboxymethylcellulose: Add Food Additives to the List of Elicitors. A 14-year-old girl developed 4 episodes of anaphylaxis of unknown etiology, which required intramuscular adrenaline administration each time. She had eaten pizza and a cheeseburger immediately before the first 2 episodes, respectively, but had not eaten anything for several hours before the last 2 episodes. It turned out that she had eaten the same ice lolly 4 hours before the first 3 episodes and a Café au lait (...) -soluble polymer derived from native cellulose, is considered to be unabsorbable from the human gut and has been widely and increasingly used in pharmaceutical preparations, cosmetics, and food. This article is the first report of anaphylaxis caused by carboxymethylcellulose-containing foods, whereas anaphylaxis to carboxymethylcellulose has been rarely associated with carboxymethylcellulose-containing pharmaceuticals. Although the exact mechanisms underlying the induction of late-onset anaphylaxis

2019 Pediatrics

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>