How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

1,063 results for

Alcohol Tremor

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

101. Differential effect of environmental risk factors on postural instability gait difficulties and tremor dominant Parkinson's disease. (PubMed)

) and alcohol use (OR 0.55 P = 0.008) were associated with a lower risk for PD. Interestingly, this inverse association was only seen in postural instability gait difficulties (PIGD) PD (P = 0.046 for smoking, P = 0.07 for alcohol consumption), and not in tremor dominant (TD) PD which was similar to controls. Consumption of coffee was lower in PD patients (3.3 ± 1.8 cups per day vs. 3.8 ± 2.0 in controls P = 0.02). In the regression model including intake of alcohol, coffee, and smoke, only coffee (P (...) Differential effect of environmental risk factors on postural instability gait difficulties and tremor dominant Parkinson's disease. Both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). We have examined environmental risk factors in a Norwegian population of incident PD patients and controls, the Norwegian ParkWest study. All five neurological wards in the study area of Western Norway participated in the study. A 4-step diagnostic procedure was used

2010 Movement Disorders

102. Ethanol Response in Essential Tremor: Clinical and Neurophysiological Correlates

effective and can have side effects. About two-thirds (66%) of people with ET have some relief from drinking alcohol, which suggests that alcohol affects the part of the brain causing the tremor. However, more research is needed to better understand the effects of alcohol or what areas of the brain might be important in the response. Objectives: To study to what extent alcohol is reducing tremor in a group of patients with essential tremor. To use transcranial magnetic stimulation to study the effects (...) of alcohol on essential tremor. Eligibility: - Individuals who are at least 21 years of age, have been diagnosed with essential tremor and have tremor in both hands, and can tolerate being off all medications for essential tremor for up to 4 weeks. Design: This study has one screening visit (1 to 2 hours), followed by one study visit (3 to 5 hours). Participants might be asked to also take part in one additional study visit (3 to 5 hours). The maximum period between the study visits is 3 months

2010 Clinical Trials

103. Pharmacologic management of essential tremor (PubMed)

Propranolol YQE403BP4D Phenobarbital IM Adrenergic beta-Antagonists therapeutic use Aged Anticonvulsants therapeutic use Ethanol therapeutic use Humans Male Phenobarbital therapeutic use Primidone therapeutic use Propranolol therapeutic use Tremor drug therapy 2010 3 16 6 0 2010 3 17 6 0 2012 3 23 6 0 ppublish 20228310 56/3/250 PMC2837692 Clin Neuropharmacol. 2008 Mar-Apr;31(2):97-103 18382182 Mov Disord. 2007 Aug 15;22(11):1660-3 17580330 Alcohol Res Health. 1999;23(1):5-14 10890793 Mov Disord. 2000 Jul (...) Pharmacologic management of essential tremor 20228310 2012 03 22 2018 11 13 1715-5258 56 3 2010 Mar Canadian family physician Medecin de famille canadien Can Fam Physician Pharmacologic management of essential tremor. 250-2 Lees Mark M Academic Family Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK. Regier Loren L Jensen Brent B eng Journal Article Canada Can Fam Physician 0120300 0008-350X 0 Adrenergic beta-Antagonists 0 Anticonvulsants 13AFD7670Q Primidone 3K9958V90M Ethanol 9Y8NXQ24VQ

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2010 Canadian Family Physician

104. Dexmedetomidine (Precedex®) for Severe Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome (AWS) and Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium (AWD)

days after Criterion A: autonomic hyperactivity (e.g., sweating or pulse rate greater than 100) increased hand tremor insomnia nausea or vomiting transient visual, tactile, or auditory hallucinations or illusions psychomotor agitation anxiety grand mal seizures The symptoms are not due to a general medical condition and are not better accounted for by another mental disorder. AND Meets DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for 291.0 Alcohol Intoxication or Withdrawal Delirium Disturbance of consciousness (...) Dexmedetomidine (Precedex®) for Severe Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome (AWS) and Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium (AWD) Dexmedetomidine (Precedex®) for Severe Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome (AWS) and Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium (AWD) - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved

2010 Clinical Trials

105. Suspected neurological conditions: recognition and referral

. 1.15.3 In adults with suspected essential tremor: Suspected neurological conditions: recognition and referral (NG127) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 23 of 73review regular medication check thyroid function assess alcohol consumption using a tool such as AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification T est), in line with the NICE guideline on alcohol-use disorders: diagnosis, assessment and management (...) of harmful drinking and alcohol dependence. Refer for neurological assessment only if the symptoms are disabling and first-line treatment as specified in the BNF is ineffective or not tolerated. 1.15.4 Consider referring adults with troublesome tremor of the head to a movement disorder clinic. T o find out why the committee made the recommendations on tremor in adults, see rationale. 1.16 Information and support 1.16.1 Follow the principles in the NICE guideline on patient experience in adult NHS

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

106. Assessment of ataxia

in the prevalence of many mutations. Schöls L, Bauer P, Schmidt T, et al. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias: clinical features, genetics, and pathogenesis. Lancet Neurol. 2004 May;3(5):291-304. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15099544?tool=bestpractice.com Differentials Alcoholic cerebellar degeneration Ischaemic stroke (cerebellum) Ischaemic stroke (brain stem) Haemorrhage in the cerebellum Multiple sclerosis (MS) Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome Drug-induced ataxia Toxic neuropathies Von Hippel-Lindau (...) ) Spinocerebellar ataxia 37 (SCA 37) Spinocerebellar ataxia 38 (SCA 38) Spinocerebellar ataxia 40 (SCA 40) Dentatorubral-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA) Episodic ataxia type 1 Episodic ataxia type 2 Fragile-X tremor-ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) Mitochondrial cytopathy Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) Contributors Authors Assistant Professor of Neurology The Ohio State University Columbus OH Disclosures BKC declares that she has no competing interests. Dr Barbara Kelly Changizi would like to gratefully acknowledge

2019 BMJ Best Practice

107. Managing opioid use disorder in primary care: PEER simplified guideline

Ondanestron 4mg PO Q6H PRN Diarrhea Loperamide 4mg, followed by 2mg after each loose stool (max:16mg/day) &OLQLFDO2SLDWH:LWKGUDZDO6FDOH &2:6 6FRUH † Category (Points), Clinician Administered WORSE Resting Pulse Rate 0 1 2 4 Sweating 0 1 2 3 4 Observed Restlessness 0 1 3 5 Pupil Size 0 1 2 5 Bone or Joint Aches 0 1 2 4 Runny Nose or Tearing 0 1 2 4 Gastrointestinal Upset 0 1 2 3 5 Observed Tremor of Outreached Hands 0 1 2 4 Observed Yawning 0 1 2 4 Anxiety or Irritability 0 1 2 4 Goose?esh Skin 0 2 3 4 (...) 2018;362:k3207. 3. Gomes T, Khuu W, Craiovan D, Martins D, Hunt J, Lee K, et al. Comparing the contribution of prescribed opioids to opioid-related hospitalizations across Canada: a multi-jurisdictional cross-sectional study. Drug Alcohol Depend 2018;191:86-90. Epub 2018 Jul 31. 4. Canadian Institute for Health Information. Pan-Canadian trends in the prescription of opioids, 2012 to 2016. Ottawa, ON: Canadian Institute for Health Information; 2017. Available from: https://secure.cihi.ca/free_products

2019 CPG Infobase

108. Canadian guideline for Parkinson disease

and written form. n Discussions should aim to achieve a balance between providing realistic information and promoting optimism. n Families and caregivers should be informed about the condition and available support services. DIAGNOSIS AND PROGRESSION n Parkinson disease should be suspected in anyone with tremor, stiness, slowness, balance problems or gait disorders. n CT or MRI brain scanning should not be routinely used to diagnose Parkinson disease. n Patients, especially young, who request genetic (...) to achieve a balance between providing realistic information and promoting optimism. n Families and caregivers should be informed about the condition and available support services. DIAGNOSIS AND PROGRESSION n Parkinson disease should be suspected in anyone with tremor, stiness, slowness, balance problems or gait disorders. n CT or MRI brain scanning should not be routinely used to diagnose Parkinson disease. n Patients, especially young, who request genetic testing should be assessed by a movement

2019 CPG Infobase

109. Parkinson?s disease in adults

Parkinson's disease in people presenting with tremor, stiffness, slowness, balance problems and/or gait disorders. [2006] [2006] 1.2.2 If Parkinson's disease is suspected, refer people quickly and untreated to a specialist with expertise in the differential diagnosis of this condition. [2006, [2006, amended 2017] amended 2017] Clinical and post-mortem diagnosis Clinical and post-mortem diagnosis 1.2.3 Diagnose Parkinson's disease clinically, based on the UK Parkinson's Disease Society Brain Bank Clinical (...) .) [2006] [2006] Single photon emission computed tomogr Single photon emission computed tomograph aphy y 1.2.6 Consider 123 I-FP-CIT single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for people with tremor if essential tremor cannot be clinically differentiated from parkinsonism. [2006, amended 2017] [2006, amended 2017] 1.2.7 123 I-FP-CIT SPECT should be available to specialists with expertise in its use and interpretation. [2006] [2006] Parkinson’s disease in adults (NG71) © NICE 2019. All rights

2017 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

110. Guidelines on Chronic Coronary Syndromes

test 18 3.1.5.6 Invasive testing 19 3.1.6 Step 6: assess event risk 21 3.1.6.1 Definition of levels of risk 22 3.2 Lifestyle management 23 3.2.1 General management of patients with coronary artery disease 23 3.2.2 Lifestyle modification and control of risk factors 23 3.2.2.1 Smoking 23 3.2.2.2 Diet and alcohol 24 3.2.2.3 Weight management 24 3.2.2.4 Physical activity 24 3.2.2.5 Cardiac rehabilitation 24 3.2.2.6 Psychosocial factors 24 3.2.2.7 Environmental factors 25 3.2.2.8 Sexual activity 25

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2019 European Society of Cardiology

111. Cognitive-behavioural treatment for amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS)-use disorders

fatigue/drowsiness; decreased appetite; dry mouth; dilated pupils; increased respiration; heightened alertness/energy; nausea; headache; palpitations; altered sexual behaviour; tremor/twitching of small muscles; release of social inhibitions; and unrealistic feelings of cleverness, great competence and power (Barr et al., ; Lee & Rawson, ). Amphetamines can be ingested, injected, smoked and snorted. Prolonged amphetamine use may result in more severe and devastating consequences. These include (...) of these substances is relatively recent (Rogers et al., ). Young MDMA users frequently use drugs in club or all‐night dance parties, known as 'raves.' They tend to take drugs with alcohol and dance for a long time, and this may result in hyperthermia, dehydration, hypertension, and even kidney failure and death (NIDA, ). ATS‐use disorder can be diagnosed by several set of criteria. For example, according to the ICD‐10 (International Classification of Diseases – 10th Revision), substance dependence syndrome

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2019 Campbell Collaboration

112. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome

6 to 24 hours after the last drink. It can last for up to one week. To be classified as alcohol withdrawal syndrome, patients must exhibit at least two of the following symptoms: increased hand tremor, insomnia, nausea or vomiting, transient hallucinations (auditory, visual or tactile), , anxiety, , and . The severity of symptoms is dictated by a number of factors, the most important of which are degree of alcohol intake, length of time the individual has been using alcohol, and previous history (...) of alcohol withdrawal. Symptoms are also grouped together and classified: Alcohol hallucinosis: patients have transient visual, auditory, or tactile hallucinations, but are otherwise clear. Withdrawal seizures: seizures occur within 48 hours of alcohol cessations and occur either as a single generalized tonic-clonic seizure or as a brief episode of multiple seizures. Delirium tremens: hyperadrenergic state, disorientation, tremors, diaphoresis, impaired attention/consciousness, and visual and auditory

2012 Wikipedia

113. Long-term effects of alcohol

of alcohol abuse. The syndrome is a combined manifestation of two eponymous disorders, and . Wernicke's encephalopathy is the acute presentation of the syndrome and is characterised by a state while Korsakoff's psychosis main are and . " ", intravenous fluid containers containing vitamins and minerals (bright yellow due to the vitamins), can be used to mitigate these outcomes. Essential tremor [ ] —or, in the case of essential tremors on a background of family history of essential tremors, familial (...) tremors—can be temporarily relieved in up to two-thirds of patients by drinking small amounts of alcohol. Ethanol is known to activate aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) and inhibit N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors, which are both implicated in essential tremor pathology and could underlie the ameliorative effects. Additionally, the effects of ethanol have been studied in different animal essential tremor models. (For more details on this topic, see .) Sleep [ ] Main article: Chronic use

2012 Wikipedia

114. Short-term effects of alcohol

using alcohol-related phenotypes in a Native American community sample". American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics . 165 (8): 673–683. : . Dodge NC, Jacobson JL, Jacobson SW (2014). . Neurotoxicol Teratol . 41 : 43–50. : . . . , H.-P. Krüger, J. Kazenwadel and M. Vollrath, Center for Traffic Sciences, University of Wuerzburg, Röntgenring 11, D-97070 Würzburg, Germany , Indiana U. (Researchgate link) Mostile G, Jankovic J (2010). "Alcohol in essential tremor and other (...) Short-term effects of alcohol Short-term effects of alcohol consumption - Wikipedia Short-term effects of alcohol consumption From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from ) Results of the 2010 study ranking the levels of damage caused by drugs, in the opinion of drug-harm experts. When harm to self and others is summed, alcohol was the most harmful of all drugs considered, scoring 72%. The short-term effects of (also known formally as ) consumption – due to drinking beer, wine

2012 Wikipedia

115. Caffeinated energy drinks and effects in UK young people

drinks, and between 10% and 36% report mixing these with alcohol. Consumption varies by age group and country. Some evidence suggests males consume more energy drinks than females, who may start to consume CEDs at a slightly younger age. There is conflicting evidence of consumption by ethnicity. The two UK studies found that 11% of surveyed young people consume CEDs on a daily basis, and link higher use in males and those with lower socioeconomic status. We found consistent findings across reviews (...) for: physical symptoms (e.g. headaches, sleep-related issues); behavioural effects such as alcohol, smoking and substance use; behaviour disorders; and poorer psychological well-being (e.g. irritation, anger). Contradictory evidence was reported for anxiety and depression; and limited evidence suggested associations with self- harming and suicide-related behaviour. Mixing alcohol with energy drinks was linked to engaging in risky lifestyle behaviours and self-injury. Little evidence described educational

2019 EPPI Centre

116. Amfetamine overdose

drug interaction hypertension hyperreflexia and clonus chest pain cardiac arrhythmia hx of hepatitis B or C, HIV tremor, repetitive movements disorientation, confusion, delirium malnutrition superficial venous abnormalities rapid speech, pacing, trismus hallucinations or delusions tremor, hypertonicity, or muscle rigidity paranoia, hypervigilance, or psychosis mydriasis hx of heart disease tachypnoea dyspnoea lack of thirst abdominal pain positive Babinski focal neurological signs, papilloedema (...) high ambient temperature volume depletion exercise and sweating excessive alcohol intake polydrug usage anxiety and depression hx of behavioural disturbance hx of delinquency or crime ADHD attendance at dance club or rave party hx of drug misuse for more than 1 year genetic predilection Diagnostic investigations serum glucose serum electrolytes serum creatinine, urea ABG serum AST, ALT, gamma-GT serum PT, PTT, INR urinalysis urine toxicology screen serum alcohol level serum creatine kinase serum

2018 BMJ Best Practice

117. Assessment of ataxia

in the prevalence of many mutations. Schöls L, Bauer P, Schmidt T, et al. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias: clinical features, genetics, and pathogenesis. Lancet Neurol. 2004 May;3(5):291-304. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15099544?tool=bestpractice.com Differentials Alcoholic cerebellar degeneration Ischaemic stroke (cerebellum) Ischaemic stroke (brain stem) Haemorrhage in the cerebellum Multiple sclerosis (MS) Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome Drug-induced ataxia Toxic neuropathies Von Hippel-Lindau (...) ) Spinocerebellar ataxia 37 (SCA 37) Spinocerebellar ataxia 38 (SCA 38) Spinocerebellar ataxia 40 (SCA 40) Dentatorubral-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA) Episodic ataxia type 1 Episodic ataxia type 2 Fragile-X tremor-ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) Mitochondrial cytopathy Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) Contributors Authors Assistant Professor of Neurology The Ohio State University Columbus OH Disclosures BKC declares that she has no competing interests. Dr Barbara Kelly Changizi would like to gratefully acknowledge

2018 BMJ Best Practice

118. Zinc deficiency

presence of risk factors increased susceptibility to infection stomatitis delayed wound healing acrodermatitis enteropathica fertility issues/adverse pregnancy outcomes fatigue gastrointestinal symptoms short stature bone fracture impaired glucose tolerance dermatitis weight loss alopecia paronychia fever intention tremor depression impaired concentration nystagmus dysarthria night blindness hypogeusia anosmia blepharitis dementia living in a developing region age >65 years chronic gastrointestinal (GI (...) ) and liver disease renal disease sickle cell disease diabetes mellitus chronic treatment with hydrochlorothiazide, penicillamine, ethambutol, certain antibiotics HIV infection alcoholism long-term vegetarian/vegan diets specialised weight-loss diets infants with nutrient-poor diets FHx of zinc deficiency anorexia nervosa Diagnostic investigations serum or plasma zinc levels serum iron level serum 25-OH vitamin D level serum folate serum vitamin B12 cell zinc content analysis of zinc levels in hair

2018 BMJ Best Practice

119. Bariatric surgery: an HTA report on the efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness

the presence of (pre- )diabetes, hypertension, a low HDL-cholesterol, high triglycerides, and/or a high waist-circumference might indicate a higher associated risk, as is also the presence of non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis. Insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome are more prevalent in people with visceral adiposity. Obesity clearly does imply risks, may lead to physical and psychological symptoms, can cause functional limitation, the development of co- morbidities and complications, and cause psycho (...) arterial disease, nephropathy, neuropathy, retinopathy Hypertension Chronic kidney disease Hyperlipidaemia Peripheral artery disease Other diabetes complications Gastrointestinal Gastro-oesophagal reflux Gallstones Liver fat accumulation and Non- alcoholic steatohepatitis KCE Report 316 Bariatric Surgery 23 Cirrhosis – hepatocellular carcinoma Restricted ventilation Exertional dyspnoe; asthma Obstructive sleep apnoe Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (Pickwick syndrome) Mechanical effects of weight

2019 Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre

120. Opioid Use Disorder - Diagnosis and Management in Primary Care

depression. Commonly observed side effects include headaches, pain, nausea, vomiting, hyperhidrosis, constipation, insomnia, vasodilation and over-sedation. These side effects are similar to but lower in intensity than side effects of full opioid receptor agonists (e.g., methadone). Buprenorphine can act synergistically with benzodiazepines, alcohol and/or other sedating medications to significantly increase risk of respiratory depression, overdose or death. Concurrent use of buprenorphine (...) supply), at the discretion of the treating clinician. Assessment for buprenorphine/naloxone induction It is imperative to establish the following prior to induction : Assess for common contraindications to buprenorphine/naloxone induction: allergy to components of buprenorphine/naloxone; severe respiratory distress; delirium tremens ; acute alcohol intoxication; and severe liver insufficiency. Note: Liver enzyme tests are recommended (see below) but not required to start treatment due

2018 Clinical Practice Guidelines and Protocols in British Columbia

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>