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Alcohol Tremor

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181. Poststroke depression

between PSD and mortality in 2 out of 3 studies that investigated this association. A subsequent study of stroke survivors followed in the South London Stroke Register revealed that individuals with PSD had a greater risk of mortality (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.13–1.77). The association between PSD and mortality was strongest in individuals <65 years of age. Adjustment for comorbidities, smoking, alcohol use, SSRI use, social support, and adherence with medications did not change these associations

2016 American Academy of Neurology

182. Poststroke Depression: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association

mortality at follow-up for individuals with PSD. Ayerbe et al’s 2013 meta-analysis found an association between PSD and mortality in 2 out of 3 studies that investigated this association. A subsequent study of stroke survivors followed in the South London Stroke Register revealed that individuals with PSD had a greater risk of mortality (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.13–1.77). The association between PSD and mortality was strongest in individuals <65 years of age. Adjustment for comorbidities, smoking, alcohol

2016 American Heart Association

183. Diagnosis and Management of Essential Tremor and Dystonic Tremor (PubMed)

Diagnosis and Management of Essential Tremor and Dystonic Tremor Essential tremor (ET) is the most common adult movement disorder. Traditionally considered as a benign disease, it can cause an important physical and psychosocial disability. Drug treatment for ET remains poor and often unsatisfactory. Current therapeutic strategies for ET are reviewed according to the level of discomfort caused by tremor. For mild tremor, nonpharmacological strategies consist of alcohol and acute pharmacological (...) therapy; for moderate tremor, pharmacological therapies (propranolol, gabapentin, primidone, topiramate, alprazolam and other drugs); and for severe tremor, the role of functional surgery is emphasised (thalamic deep brain stimulation, thalamotomy). The more specific treatment of head tremor with the use of botulinum toxin is also discussed. Several points are discussed to guide the immediate research into this disease in the near future. Dystonic tremor is a common symptom in dystonia. Diagnostic

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2009 Therapeutic advances in neurological disorders

184. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for the management of anxiety, posttraumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders

://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-244X/14/S1/S1 Page 4 of 83respiratory disease, migraine headaches, and allergic con- ditions compared to those without anxiety disorders [16,52]. Comorbid anxiety and related disorders have a significant impact on quality of life (QoL) in patients with medical conditions [52]. Baseline assessment Baseline assessment should include a review of systems, prescribed medications, over-the- counter agents, alcohol use, caffeine intake, and illicit drug use, in addition to evaluation (...) : The most com- mon side effects seen with SSRIs and SNRIs include headache, irritability, gastrointestinal complaints, insom- nia, sexual dysfunction, weight gain, increased anxiety, drowsiness, and tremor [85-88]. Patients report that the most common bothersome side effects are sexual dys- function, drowsiness, fatigue, and weight gain [87,88]. Most side effects occur early and transiently during the first two weeks of treatment, but others, such as sexual dysfunction and weight gain, may persist

2014 CPG Infobase

186. Treatment-Related Nausea and Vomiting (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

courses of chemotherapy. Patients with poor control of N&V during past chemotherapy cycles are likely to experience N&V in subsequent cycles. History of chronic alcohol use. Patients with a history of chronic high intake of alcohol are less likely to experience cisplatin-induced N&V.[ ] Age. N&V is more likely to occur in patients younger than 50 years.[ ] Gender. N&V is more likely to occur in women.[ , ] History of morning sickness or emesis during pregnancy. Additional causal factors may include (...) of a prediction tool for identifying patients at high risk for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. J Support Oncol 11 (1): 14-21, 2013. [ ] Bouganim N, Dranitsaris G, Hopkins S, et al.: Prospective validation of risk prediction indexes for acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Curr Oncol 19 (6): e414-21, 2012. [ ] [ ] Sullivan JR, Leyden MJ, Bell R: Decreased cisplatin-induced nausea and vomiting with chronic alcohol ingestion. N Engl J Med 309 (13): 796, 1983. [ ] Tonato M, Roila

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

187. Evidence-based guidelines for treating bipolar disorder

Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Gateshead, Tyne and Wear, UK 14 UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA 15 Division of Psychiatry and Applied Psychology, Institute of Mental Health, University of Nottingham Innovation Park, Nottingham, UK 16 MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, School of Experimental (...) and corticosteroids are the most common prescribed medications associated with secondary mania (I). More commonly, alcohol and/or drug use is co-morbid with manic or depressive mood change (I). The mood state will then significantly outlast the drugged state and a diagnosis of bipolar disorder can be made (S). Borderline personality disorder is an important diagnosis that may either be confused with or be co-morbid with bipolar disor- der. Reliable diagnosis of either condition can only be achieved by using

2016 British Association for Psychopharmacology

188. Atrial Fibrillation ? Diagnosis and Management

maintained by arrhythmogenic foci, often pulmonary veins. It could be paroxysmal or persistent. Lone or idiopathic AF Occurs in the absence of structural heart disease, hypertension, diabetes or other identifiable cause for the arrhythmia (e.g., hyperthyroidism or alcohol abuse). Transient AF An irregular heartbeat pattern presented in individuals who are otherwise healthy. A transient AF episode can be the result of stress, dehydration, alcohol or drug use as well as secondary to other conditions (...) • Myocarditis • Sick sinus syndrome • Pre-excitation syndromes with accessory conduction pathways (e.g., Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome) Less common cardiac causes: • Dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy • Pericardial disease (e.g., pericardial effusion, constrictive pericarditis) • Atrial septal defect • Atrial myxoma • Hyperthyroidism • Acute infections, especially pneumonia in the elderly • Acute excess alcohol intake or chronic excess alcohol intake • Narcotic abuse • Obesity • Sleep apnea

2015 Clinical Practice Guidelines and Protocols in British Columbia

189. Evidence-based Guidelines for Treating Bipolar Disorder

Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Gateshead, Tyne and Wear, UK 14 UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA 15 Division of Psychiatry and Applied Psychology, Institute of Mental Health, University of Nottingham Innovation Park, Nottingham, UK 16 MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, School of Experimental (...) and corticosteroids are the most common prescribed medications associated with secondary mania (I). More commonly, alcohol and/or drug use is co-morbid with manic or depressive mood change (I). The mood state will then significantly outlast the drugged state and a diagnosis of bipolar disorder can be made (S). Borderline personality disorder is an important diagnosis that may either be confused with or be co-morbid with bipolar disor- der. Reliable diagnosis of either condition can only be achieved by using

2016 British Association for Psychopharmacology

191. Guidance on the clinical management of depressive and bipolar disorders, specifically focusing on diagnosis and treatment strategies

are summarised in Tables 5 and 6. Table 7. Features that may distinguish bipolar and unipolar depression. Features Bipolar Unipolar ^ Family History Bipolar disorder (more likely) Bipolar disorder (less likely) Alcohol and/or substance use (more likely) Alcohol and/or substance use (less likely) Illness onset Early onset (approx. 20-25 years) Later onset (approx. 25-30 years) Onset/Offset More often abrupt More often gradual Comorbidity ADHD more often ADHD less often Duration of episodes 6 months Number

2015 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists

192. Benzodiazepine and Z-Drug Safety

Anxiety disorders Short-term treatment of insomnia Off-label indications Perioperative anxiety Bipolar disorder (manic or mixed episodes) Burning mouth syndrome Essential tremor REM sleep behavior disorder Restless legs syndrome Tardive dyskinesia Tic disorders Agitation in ICU patient Alcohol withdrawal delirium Alcohol withdrawal syndrome Chemotx nausea/vomiting Psychogenic catatonia Rapid tranquilization of agitated patient Status epilepticus (infants, children, adolescents) Anxiety Adult IR 0.25 (...) to: • Patients who are using benzodiazepines illicitly. These patients may require treatment by an addiction specialist or chemical dependency treatment provider and should be referred to Behavioral Health Services. • Patients who are using benzodiazepines for treatment of alcohol withdrawal. See the KPWA Unhealthy Drinking in Adults Guideline. • Patients who are using benzodiazepines for treatment of seizure disorder. • Patients receiving palliative, hospice, or other end-of-life care.3 About

2014 Kaiser Permanente Clinical Guidelines

193. Best Practice Guidelines for Mental Health Disorders in the Perinatal Period

, tremors, shivering, restlessness, jaundice, rigidity and hypoglycemia. 13 Mental Health Disorders in the Perinatal Period 2.0 Mental Health Disorders in the Perinatal Period 2.1 Prevalence Mental health disorders in the perinatal period are a significant health issue. Perinatal depression is the most commonly diagnosed, with the research reporting rates as high as 16%. Rates of PND and other mental health disorders vary widely in the published literature because: ? ? Sample characteristics differ (e.g (...) that the impact of other mental health disorders is similar. A. Potential impacts on women ? ? Negative views of motherhood & themselves as mothers. ? ? See their baby’s behaviour as “difficult”. ? ? May not recognize their baby’s cues & respond appropriately, with potential of negative consequences to baby’s development. ? ? May breastfeed for shorter period of time. ? ? May use alcohol, cigarettes or other substances. ? ? Increased risk of future episodes of depression and other mental health issues

2014 British Columbia Perinatal Health Program

194. Depression (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

. Pancreatic cancer.[ ] Being unmarried and having head and neck cancer.[ ] Treatment with certain chemotherapeutic agents: Corticosteroids. Procarbazine. L-Asparaginase. Interferon-alfa.[ , ] IL-2.[ , , ] Amphotericin-B. Non–cancer-related risk factors: History of depression: Two or more episodes in a lifetime. First episode early or late in life. Lack of family support.[ ] Additional concurrent life stressors.[ ] Family history of depression or suicide. Previous suicide attempts. History of alcoholism

2017 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

195. Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs)

Diazepam Adverse effects Adverse effects The most common adverse effects of diazepam relate to its sedative effect and include drowsiness and light-headedness, for example the next day - advise the person that the performance of skilled tasks such as driving may be affected. Other adverse effects include: Confusion and ataxia (especially in the elderly), amnesia, muscle weakness. Headache, vertigo, tremor, dysarthria, hypotension, decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, gynaecomastia, urinary retention (...) the risk of dependency. Frailty and the elderly — increased falls risk; a reduced dose may be appropriate. A history of drug and/or alcohol misuse or dependency — increased risk of dependency. Do not prescribe diazepam to pregnant women unless unavoidable (for example, for seizure control) — risk of neonatal withdrawal symptoms. Do not prescribe diazepam to breastfeeding women if possible — diazepam is excreted in breast milk with the potential to cause infant sedation. [ ; ] Drug interactions Drug

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

196. Palliative care - nausea and vomiting

infection. Motion sickness. Alcohol intake. Table 2 . Causes of nausea and vomiting in people receiving palliative care. Causes Mechanism leading to nausea and vomiting Chemical Drugs (for example opioids, cytotoxics, and antibiotics) Metabolic (for example organ failure and hypercalcaemia) Toxins (for example food poisoning and ischaemic bowel) Chemicals and toxins stimulate receptors in the chemoreceptor trigger zone. Cytotoxic drugs cause vagal receptor stimulation, resulting in stimulation (...) – – +++ – Haloperidol +++ – – – Levomepromazine ++ +++ ++ +++ – none or insignificant; + slight; ++ moderate; +++ marked. * Metoclopramide in higher doses >= 100 mg, demonstrates 5-HT 3 -receptor antagonism. † Domperidone does not cross the blood brain barrier so the risk of extrapyramidal adverse effects (such as tremors, slurred speech, and dystonia) is negligible. Information from : [ ] Basis for recommendation Basis for recommendation Nausea and vomiting can be controlled in up to 70% of people in palliative

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

197. Delirium

and/or withdrawing from drugs or alcohol, or the management of delirium in secondary care. There are separate CKS topics on , , , , and . The target audience for this CKS topic is healthcare professionals working within the NHS in the UK, and providing first contact or primary healthcare. How up-to-date is this topic? How up-to-date is this topic? Changes Changes November 2016 — reviewed. Literature searches were conducted to identify evidence-based guidelines, UK policy, systematic reviews, and key RCTs (...) (such as stroke or heart failure). Significant injuries such as hip fracture. Functional impairment (for example immobility or the use of physical restraints such as cot sides). Iatrogenic events (such as bladder catheterization, polypharmacy, or surgery). History of, or current, alcohol excess. Sensory impairment (such as visual impairment or hearing loss). Poor nutrition. Lack of stimulation. Terminal phase of illness. The risk of delirium is increased by the number of predisposing factors present

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

199. Metreleptin (metreleptin (genetical recombination))

, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance, etc., which results in elevated blood glucose levels. 2 Medical conditions related to metabolic abnormalities affecting long-term prognosis of patients with lipodystrophy include non-alcoholic steatohepatitis with subsequent cirrhosis, acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia, and diabetic complications, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and atherosclerosis, which are caused by chronic hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. In severe cases, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis can (...) as GLP-compliant studies; however, no raw data were available and the results were submitted as the reference data. 5 Phosphate buffered saline 6 The applicant explains that these parameters had not been analyzed statistically and additional statistical analysis cannot be performed because of unavailability of raw data. 7 Fat was extracted from each mouse with ethyl ether and ethyl alcohol after 5-day dehydration period and then the total body fat was measured. . 13 after repeated subcutaneous

2013 Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency, Japan

200. Update on Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Light of Recent Evidence

-related practices, including moderate alcohol intake, substituting healthy fats (eg, monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids) for saturated and trans fats, limiting added sugars, engaging in regular physical activity, and losing excess weight. These changes can reduce triglycerides by 20% to 50%. Dietary Supplements With regard to dietary supplements, no consistent findings have emerged from large-scale, randomized trials in individuals with diabetes mellitus. , In individuals without

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2015 American Heart Association

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