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Acute Vision Loss

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2921. Lutein/Zeaxanthin and Omega-3 Supplementation in Persons Over Age 60

portion, worsens in condition. AMD causes progressive loss of central vision, with only peripheral vision remaining, that is, the ability for someone to see from the edges of the eye. To date, there is not any effective treatment to improve vision for most people whose AMD is advanced. Yet some data from research studies suggest a possible role of antioxidants, including lutein, in reducing the risk of AMD and cataracts. Lutein and zeaxanthin belong to the carotenoid family of vitamins, of which (...) there are more than 600. There are 40 or 50 carotenoids in the typical diet of human beings, but only 14 major dietary ones are identified in human plasma. Lutein, in particular, is a vitamin that is found naturally in the retina, especially in the macula, the region of the eye that is essential for fine, detailed vision. Previous studies have shown that higher levels of foods rich in Omega-3 fatty acid were associated with a lower likelihood of AMD. Patients ages 60 and older who may or may not have AMD

2005 Clinical Trials

2922. Intravenous (IV) Pantoprazole in Erosive Esophagitis

diseases; lung diseases; sepsis; and airway intubation. Patients with history of glaucoma in either eye; history of any intraocular eye surgery within preceding 3 months; history of, or presence of, signs of optic nerve swelling; history of acute change in vision; or vision loss in either eye. Patients with any malignancy (except skin cancer) which required therapy within the last 6 months Patients with history of allergy to any proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) including pantoprazole Patients with known

2005 Clinical Trials

2923. Atorvastatin (Lipitor) Therapy in Patients With Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS) at Risk for Multiple Sclerosis

: CIS is a single clinical event indicating temporary disruption of normal nerve function. CIS patients may have a loss of vision in one eye; trouble with balance; double vision; numbness in the face; and tingling, numbness, or weakness in the arms or legs. Some CIS patients may develop MS, but others may not. Studies have shown that when CIS is accompanied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected brain lesions that are consistent with those seen in MS, there is a high risk of a second (...) isolated syndrome (CIS) as defined by an acute or subacute well-defined neurological event lasting at least 48 hours and consistent with MS (i.e., optic neuritis, spinal cord syndrome, brainstem/cerebellar syndromes). Other causes for optic neuritis other than CIS must be ruled out by an ophthalmologist. Patients with other "clinically silent" abnormal findings found upon neurological examination that are not attributable to the presenting symptom are not excluded. Onset of CIS symptoms occurring

2004 Clinical Trials

2924. Ranibizumab Injections to Treat Retinal Tumors in Patients With Von Hippel-Lindau Syndrome

(NEI) Information provided by: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC) Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: This study will examine whether he drug ranibizumab can slow or stop the growth of angiomas (blood vessel tumors) in patients with Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL). Angiomas commonly develop in the back of the eye on the retina and the optic nerve in patients with VHL. Although these tumors are not cancerous, they may cause significant vision loss. Current (...) eyes and central vision loss of 20/40 or worse may be eligible for this study. Participants undergo the following tests and procedures: Medical history, physical examination, electrocardiogram (EKG) and blood tests. Eye examination, including eye pressure measurement and dilation of the pupils to examine the retina. Fluorescein angiography to evaluate the eye's blood vessels. For this test, a yellow dye is injected into an arm vein and travels to the blood vessels in the eyes. Pictures

2004 Clinical Trials

2925. Triamcinolone Acetonide Plus Laser Therapy to Treat Age-Related Macular Degeneration

a person's ability to read, drive, and carry out daily activities. This vision loss is caused by the formation of abnormal blood vessels behind the retina that leak blood under the macula. PTD stops the growth of these blood vessels and slows the rate of vision loss; however, it has only a temporary effect and does not work in all patients. Furthermore, it may actually cause some swelling and re-growth of blood vessels. Triamcinolone acetonide can help lessen swelling and scarring. Patients 50 years (...) the most common cause of blindness in persons over the age of 50. The major cause of vision loss in this disease is due to the development of choroidal neovascularization. Several clinical trials have shown that eyes with neovascularization portending 4 disc areas or less or all lesions with predominately classic composition (lesions having at least 50% of vessels which can be readily demarcated with fluorescein angiography) can benefit from treatment with photodynamic therapy (verteporfin - PDT

2004 Clinical Trials

2926. Photodynamic therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. (PubMed)

Photodynamic therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. In neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) new vessels grow under the retina distorting vision and leading to scarring. This is exacerbated if the blood vessels leak. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been investigated as a way to treat the neovascular membranes without affecting the retina.The aim of this review was to examine the effects of PDT in the treatment of neovascular AMD.We searched CENTRAL (Issue 1, 2007 (...) acuity at 24 months comparing the intervention with the control group was 0.62 (95% confidence interval 0.50 to 0.76). The results at 12 months were similar to those at 24 months. The most serious adverse outcome, acute (within seven days of treatment) severe visual acuity decrease, occurs in about one in 50 patients. Some outcomes from the more recent VIM trial could be included in the meta-analysis but have not greatly altered the findings.Photodynamic therapy in people with choroidal

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2007 Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online)

2927. Photodynamic therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. (PubMed)

Photodynamic therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. In neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) new vessels grow under the retina distorting vision and leading to scarring. This is exacerbated if the blood vessels leak. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been investigated as a way to treat the neovascular membranes without affecting the retina.The aim of this review was to examine the effects of PDT in the treatment of neovascular AMD.We searched the Cochrane Central (...) Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which includes the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) on The Cochrane Library (Issue 1, 2005), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2005), EMBASE (1980 to January 2005). We used the Science Citation Index to search for reports that cited relevant studies. We contacted experts in the field and searched the reference lists of relevant studies.We included randomised trials of PDT in people with choroidal neovascularisation due to AMD.Two authors independently

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2005 Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online)

2928. EYE001 to Treat Retinal Tumors in Patients With Von Hippel-Lindau Syndrome

of Health Clinical Center (CC) Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: This study will test the ability of the experimental drug EYE001 to reduce retinal thickening and improve vision in patients with Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL). Angiomas (blood vessel tumors) commonly develop in the back of the eye on the retina and the optic nerve in patients with VHL. Although the tumors are not cancerous, they may cause significant vision loss. Current treatments, including laser therapy (...) , cryotherapy, and vitrectomy, may not be successful or possible for all patients. EYE001 decreases production of VEGF, a growth factor that is important for the formation of new blood vessels and that is elevated in VHL. Preliminary findings from studies of other retinal diseases suggest that EYE001 can reduce retinal thickening and improve vision. Patients 18 years of age and older with retinal angiomas due to VHL in one or both eyes and central vision loss of 20/40 or worse may be eligible for this study

2003 Clinical Trials

2929. Mid-luteal Phase Synchronization of Ovarian Folliculogenesis in Women

or coronary artery disease. acute liver disease. history of, or actual, benign or malignant liver tumors. history of, or suspected, carcinoma of the breast. known, or suspected, estrogen-dependent neoplasia. undiagnosed abnormal vaginal bleeding. any ocular lesion arising from ophthalmic vascular disease, such as partial or complete loss of vision or defect in visual field. Contacts and Locations Go to Information from the National Library of Medicine To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may

2007 Clinical Trials

2930. A Phase I/IIa Study for the Treatment of Uveitis With Iontophoresis

no related adverse Effects. Still more, it was observed an increase of the visual acuity and decrease of the clinical inflammation in this group of patients. No of the patients loss vision and the inflammation biomarkers, taken like a whole, continued improving up to 30 days after the treatment. Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Estimated Enrollment : 30 participants Allocation: Non-Randomized Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment (...) inflammation (1). For that reason, not only they diminish the inflammatory reaction, but they also diminish the formation of permanent scar, that often is responsible for the visual loss (2,3). The most severe systemic adverse effects of the corticosteroids are: systemic hyperglicemy, the formation of gastric ulcers, avascular necrosis to of the head of the femur, suppression of the hypothalamus-pituitary adrenal axis, arterial hypertension among others (21,22). In order to diminish the severe systemic

2007 Clinical Trials

2931. B-Lymphocyte Immunotherapy in Islet Transplantation

or by a continuous supply of insulin through a wearable pump. Insulin therapy allows long-term survival in individuals with type 1 diabetes; however, it does not guarantee constant normal blood sugar control. Because of this, long-term type 1 diabetic survivors often develop vascular complications, such as diabetic retinopathy, an eye disease that can cause poor vision and blindness, and diabetic nephropathy, a kidney disease that can lead to kidney failure. Some individuals with type 1 diabetes develop (...) day averaged over each week Administration of three or more insulin injections each day or insulin pump therapy Under the direction of an endocrinologist, diabetologist, or diabetes specialist with at least three evaluations the 12 months prior to study enrollment At least one episode of severe hypoglycemia in the past 12 months, defined as an event with one of the following symptoms: memory loss; confusion; uncontrollable behavior; irrational behavior; unusual difficulty in awakening; suspected

2007 Clinical Trials

2932. LEA29Y (Belatacept) Emory Edmonton Protocol

through a wearable pump. Insulin therapy allows long-term survival in individuals with type 1 diabetes; however, it does not guarantee constant normal blood sugar control. Because of this, long-term type 1 diabetic survivors often develop vascular complications, such as diabetic retinopathy, an eye disease that can cause poor vision and blindness, and diabetic nephropathy, a kidney disease that can lead to kidney failure. Some individuals with type 1 diabetes develop hypoglycemia unawareness, a life (...) or minus 10% of Day 0 body weight. Other Name: NUJOLIX Biological: Basiliximab Immunosuppressive medication for prophylaxis of acute transplant rejection. Two Intravenous (IV) doses of basiliximab, a monoclonal antibody Interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor blocker, will be given with the first and second (if necessary) transplants. The first dose will be 20 mg and will be given within two hours prior to islet transplant on the day of islet transplantation. The second 20 mg dose will be given on Day 4 after

2007 Clinical Trials

2933. Dexmedetomidine Versus Propofol for Continuous Sedation in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU)

to vascular causes, infection, intracranial expansion or injury Uncompensated acute circulatory failure at time of randomisation (severe hypotension with mean arterial pressure [MAP] < 55 mmHg despite volume and pressors) Severe bradycardia (heart rate [HR] < 50 beats/min) AV-conduction block II-III (unless pacemaker installed) Severe hepatic impairment (bilirubin > 101 µmol/l) Need for muscle relaxation at the time of randomisation (may only be used for intubation and initial stabilization) Loss (...) to moderate sedation (target RASS = 0 to -3) using propofol Patients should be randomised within 72 hours from ICU admission and within 48 hours of commencing continuous sedation in the ICU Patients should have an expected requirement for sedation more than 24 hours from time of randomisation Written informed consent must be obtained according to local regulations before starting any study procedures other than pre-screening Exclusion Criteria: Acute severe intracranial or spinal neurological disorder due

2007 Clinical Trials

2934. Dexmedetomidine Versus Midazolam for Continuous Sedation in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU)

< 50 beats/min) AV-conduction block II-III (unless pacemaker installed) Severe hepatic impairment (bilirubin > 101 µmol/L) Need for muscle relaxation at the time of randomisation (may only be used for intubation and initial stabilization) Loss of hearing or vision, or any other condition which would significantly interfere with the collection of study data Burn injuries requiring regular anaesthesia or surgery Use of centrally acting α2 agonists or antagonists at the time of randomisation, notably (...) requirement for sedation of at least 24 hours from time of randomisation Written informed consent must be obtained according to local regulations before starting any study procedures other than pre-screening. Exclusion Criteria: Acute severe intracranial or spinal neurological disorder due to vascular causes, infection, intracranial expansion or injury Uncompensated acute circulatory failure at time of randomisation (severe hypotension with MAP < 55 mmHg despite volume and pressors) Severe bradycardia (HR

2007 Clinical Trials

2935. Safety and Immunogenicity of ChimeriVax-WN02 West Nile Vaccine in Healthy Adults

Clinically significant depression Sudden visual impairment (e.g., loss of vision, double vision) Slurred or abnormal speech Sudden onset of vertigo Focal weakness in any extremity Focal sensory loss in any extremity Impaired balance Impaired gait. Subjects with any diagnosis of dementia or associated concomitant medications (e.g., Aricept) used for treating dementia. Subjects with active or a history of neurologic disease or injury, including, but not limited to: Parkinson's, Guillain Barre, epilepsy (...) drawing test score Subject had to be available for all required study visits, including all planned follow-up visits. Women of child-bearing potential should be using hormonal contraception. Exclusion Criteria: Part 2 Clinically significant abnormalities on the Screening 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG). An acute or chronic medical condition that, in the opinion of the Investigator, would render vaccination unsafe or would interfere with the evaluation of responses. These conditions included, but were

2007 Clinical Trials

2936. Surgical Outcomes After Routine Cataract Extraction & Implantation of a Conventional or Spheric Intraocular Lens

Last Update Posted : August 21, 2006 Sponsor: Medical University of South Carolina Information provided by: Medical University of South Carolina Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: To determine quality of vision post cataract extraction and intraocular lens (IOL) implantation of 2 different acrylic intraocular lenses: Acrysof® Single-Piece IOL and Acrysof® WF, through evaluation of contrast sensitivity, glare testing, visual outcomes, wavefront, corneal topography, and patient (...) letters read correctly in the 20/30 line. Naturally dilated pupil (in dim light) ≥ 4.0 mm in both eyes. Exclusion Criteria: Preoperative ocular pathology potentially affecting visual acuity Previous intraocular or corneal surgery. Keratometric astigmatism exceeding 1.5 diopters. Planned postoperative refraction for mono-vision. Current contact lens usage. Other ocular surgery at the time of the cataract extraction. Uncontrolled diabetes. Any neurological condition that might interfere with performance

2006 Clinical Trials

2937. Ophthalmic diagnoses in the ED: optic neuritis. (PubMed)

Ophthalmic diagnoses in the ED: optic neuritis. Optic neuritis is the most common cause of decreased vision due to optic nerve dysfunction in patients who are 20 to 40 years of age. Optic neuritis, or inflammation of the optic nerve, is primarily due to idiopathic demyelination. Demyelinative lesions seen in optic neuritis are not unlike those seen in plaque associated with multiple sclerosis. In fact, acute inflammatory demyelination of the optic nerve commonly occurs as an initial (...) manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Key features of optic neuritis include a vision loss occurring over 1 to 10 days, color vision impairment, eye pain with motility, and an afferent pupillary defect. This significant diagnosis can be challenging to an emergency physician as it is relatively infrequently observed.

2007 American Journal of Emergency Medicine

2938. Sudden blindness caused by anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in 5 children on continuous peritoneal dialysis. (PubMed)

interruption (1 patient). One child with hepatic cirrhosis died 4 days later of acute liver insufficiency owing to ischemic hepatic necrosis. The other children had only partial improvement of vision during the following months. Because the prognosis of ischemic optic neuropathy is very poor, diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypovolemia in children on continuous peritoneal dialysis is essential to prevent such a devastating complication. (...) Sudden blindness caused by anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in 5 children on continuous peritoneal dialysis. The authors report the occurrence of sudden blindness in 5 children (mean age, 32 months; range, 11 to 60) during continuous peritoneal dialysis regimen. All children presented with loss of light perception, visual fixation and ocular pursuit, and bilateral mydriasis unreactive to bright light. Fundoscopic examination found signs of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy with disc swelling

2003 American Journal of Kidney Diseases

2939. Ischemic optic neuropathy in dialyzed patients: a previously unrecognized manifestation of calcific uremic arteriolopathy. (PubMed)

Ischemic optic neuropathy in dialyzed patients: a previously unrecognized manifestation of calcific uremic arteriolopathy. Two patients with end-stage renal disease and on long-term hemodialysis presented with hypotension and an acute unilateral loss of vision. A diagnosis of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) was made quickly, but despite high-dose steroid therapy, significant vision was not recovered. Temporal artery biopsy results showed extensive medial calcification. The possibility

2004 American Journal of Kidney Diseases

2940. Bilateral optic nerve sheath enhancement from giant cell arteritis. (PubMed)

Bilateral optic nerve sheath enhancement from giant cell arteritis. An 83-year-old man presented with acute bilateral visual loss to no light perception (NLP) OD and 20/50 OS. His fundus examination showed moderate bilateral pallid disc edema. A sedimentation rate was 60 mm/h. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and orbits with gadolinium revealed marked bilateral enhancement of the optic nerve sheaths and adjacent orbital fat. He underwent biopsies of the optic sheath OD and bilateral (...) temporal arteries. Histopathology of the optic nerve sheath area revealed fibroadipose tissue containing numerous arteries with intimal thickening, and mild mural inflammation consisting predominantly of lymphocyte with occasional giant cells. The bilateral temporal artery biopsies revealed focal disruption of the elastic lamina with rare giant cells. His vision had since stabilized on IV methypdnisolone therapy. The biopsies of the nerve sheath suggest that the radiologic finding of optic nerve sheath

2003 Journal of Rheumatology

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