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Acute Vision Loss

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181. Acute Red Eye

inflammation V. Indications: Ophthalmology Consultation Symptoms suggesting need for emergent or urgent ophthalmology evaluation Moderate to severe and Irregular pupil l involvement Blurred vision with photophobia Acute Conditions prompting emergent or urgent ophthalmology evaluation (HSV) ( ) Acute angle Other conditions where routine ophthalmology evaluation should be considered VI. Evaluation Evaluate Normal Vision Decreased Vision Acute Loss of Vision disease Determine involved Focal hyperemia suggests (...) , Eye Redness , Bloodshot Eye II. History Timing Acute, subacute or chronic Associated symptoms or Blurred Vision Photophobia Associated Conditions Systemic symptoms ( s or ) Recent illness or infection III. Exam: Eye (always) Consider first if light sensitive Delay only in cases of (irrigation precedes acuity exam) Visual fields by confrontation Defect suggests l, or CNS injury Free and painful movement in all directions exam Evaluate for pupil size and reactivity l Exam (typically with ) stain

2015 FP Notebook

182. 215ON201 BIIB033 In Acute Optic Neuritis (AON)

their last dose of study treatment. Key Exclusion Criteria: Prior episode(s) of optic neuritis or loss of vision not due to AON. Subjects with an established diagnosis of multiple sclerosis are excluded except if newly diagnosed based on the current episode of AON and positive brain magnetic resonance imaging results consistent with the 2010 revisions to the McDonald's criteria. Previous history of a clinically significant disease. Females who have a positive pregnancy test result, or who are pregnant (...) 215ON201 BIIB033 In Acute Optic Neuritis (AON) BIIB033 In Acute Optic Neuritis (AON) - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. BIIB033 In Acute Optic Neuritis (AON) The safety and scientific validity

2012 Clinical Trials

183. The MENDSII Study, Maximizing the Efficacy of Sedation and Reducing Neurological Dysfunction and Mortality in Septic Patients With Acute Respiratory Failure

or lack of commitment to aggressive treatment by family/medical team (e.g., likely to withdraw life support measures within 24 hrs of screening) Inability to understand English or deafness or vision loss that will preclude delirium evaluation. The inability to understand English (for example in Spanish-only or Mandarin-only speaking patients) will not result in exclusion at centers where the research staff is proficient and/or translation services are actively available in that particular language (...) The MENDSII Study, Maximizing the Efficacy of Sedation and Reducing Neurological Dysfunction and Mortality in Septic Patients With Acute Respiratory Failure The MENDS2 Study, Maximizing the Efficacy of Sedation and Reducing Neurological Dysfunction and Mortality in Septic Patients With Acute Respiratory Failure - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record

2012 Clinical Trials

184. Fingolimod (FTY720) in Acute Demyelinating Optic Neuritis (ADON)

more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Layout table for eligibility information Ages Eligible for Study: 18 Years to 50 Years (Adult) Sexes Eligible for Study: All Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No Criteria Inclusion Criteria: Clinical signs and symptoms of ADON in one eye (loss of vision, pain on movement, impairment of color vision) First episode of ADON Able to undergo treatment with IV steroids (...) Fingolimod (FTY720) in Acute Demyelinating Optic Neuritis (ADON) Fingolimod (FTY720) in Acute Demyelinating Optic Neuritis (ADON) - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Fingolimod (FTY720) in Acute

2012 Clinical Trials

185. Unilateral acute idiopathic maculopathy. 1991. (PubMed)

Unilateral acute idiopathic maculopathy. 1991. This is a report of nine patients who experienced sudden, severe, unilateral central vision loss following a flulike illness. Each patient had an exudative detachment of the macula. All patients experienced a spontaneous resolution of the acute macular manifestations with near-complete recovery of vision. A characteristic "bull's-eye" appearance in the macula persisted. The acute manifestations of the disorder did not recur in any of the patients (...) during the period of follow-up. The constellation of findings was suggestive of an inflammatory disease of the retinal pigment epithelium, but a specific causative agent could not be identified. The acute clinical and angiographic features, the natural course, and the residual pigment epithelial derangement were not consistent with any previously described disorder.

2012 Retina

186. Acute bilateral blindness as a presenting symptom of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (PubMed)

Acute bilateral blindness as a presenting symptom of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. NHL usually presents with lymphadenopathy or symptoms related to compression by the primary tumor of surrounding structures. While the head and neck region is a common site of involvement, blindness is rarely a presenting symptom. We report here the case of a child who presented to the emergency room with acute bilateral loss of vision and no other symptoms. Cranial imaging studies revealed a solid mass of the skull (...) base with compression on optic nerves. Diagnosis of Burkitt's lymphoma was confirmed after biopsy. The patient had partial vision improvement two days after optic nerve decompression which was done immediately at the night of presentation.Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

2012 International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

187. Computed Tomographic Angiogram of an Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm Causing Acute Retrobulbar Optic Neuropathy: A Case Report (PubMed)

that caused subarachnoid hemorrhage and vision loss in a 39-year old man. The 3D-CT angiograms were consistent with findings identified directly during surgery. (...) Computed Tomographic Angiogram of an Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm Causing Acute Retrobulbar Optic Neuropathy: A Case Report Three-dimensional computed tomographic (3D-CT) angiography is a widespread imaging modality for intracranial vascular lesions. However, 3D-CT angiograms of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm associated with acute retrobulbar optic neuropathy have not been previously described. We present 3D-CT angiograms of an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery

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2011 Korean journal of ophthalmology : KJO

188. Outer Retinal Structure in Patients With Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy. (PubMed)

Outer Retinal Structure in Patients With Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy. To correlate visual function with high-resolution images of retinal structure using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) in 4 patients with acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR).Observational case series.Four women, aged 18 to 51, with acute focal loss of visual field or visual acuity, photopsia, and minimal funduscopic changes were studied with best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), Goldmann (...) kinetic and automated perimetry and fundus-guided microperimetry, full-field and multifocal electroretinography (ffERG and mfERG), spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), and AOSLO imaging. Cone spacing was measured in 4 eyes and compared with 27 age-similar normal eyes. Additional functional testing in 1 patient suggested that cones were absent but rods remained. Serum from all patients was analyzed for anti-retinal antibody activity.In all patients vision loss was initially

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2011 American Journal of Ophthalmology

189. Acute Sphenoid Sinusitis Induced Blindness: A Case Report. (PubMed)

Acute Sphenoid Sinusitis Induced Blindness: A Case Report. Acute, isolated sphenoid sinusitis is a rare but potentially devastating clinical entity. Missing this diagnosis can lead to permanent vision loss due to injury of the optic nerve. Patients may present with preseptal inflammation, lid edema, chemosis, or ophthalmoplegia.We report a case of acute sphenoid sinusitis in a 10-year-old child who presented to the Emergency Department with essentially painless vision loss.Previously healthy (...) returned.Sphenoid sinusitis should be considered in patients presenting with acute vision loss. Awareness, early diagnosis, and intervention help prevent permanent complications.Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2011 Journal of Emergency Medicine

190. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BASELINE CLINICAL DATA AND MICROBIOLOGIC SPECTRUM IN ONE HUNDRED PATIENTS WITH ACUTE POSTCATARACT ENDOPHTHALMITIS. (PubMed)

at baseline was studied using univariate and multivariate analyses.One hundred patients were admitted to the hospital with a median delay of 6 days after cataract surgery. The main symptoms were loss of vision (94.9%) and pain (75.5%). Major clinical signs were hypopyon (72%), pupillary fibrin membrane (77.5%), and loss of fundus visibility (90%). Baseline factors significantly associated with microbiologic identification were as follows: diabetes mellitus, a shorter delay of onset, initial visual acuity (...) RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BASELINE CLINICAL DATA AND MICROBIOLOGIC SPECTRUM IN ONE HUNDRED PATIENTS WITH ACUTE POSTCATARACT ENDOPHTHALMITIS. To correlate the initial ocular presentation with bacterial identification in 100 patients with acute postcataract endophthalmitis.This was a prospective multicenter study. Demographic data, medical history, and the initial eye examination data were recorded on a standardized form. The relationship between bacterial identification and clinical factors

2011 Retina

191. Longitudinal study of vision and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in multiple sclerosis. (PubMed)

Longitudinal study of vision and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in multiple sclerosis. Cross-sectional studies of optical coherence tomography (OCT) show that retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness is reduced in multiple sclerosis (MS) and correlates with visual function. We determined how longitudinal changes in RNFL thickness relate to visual loss. We also examined patterns of RNFL thinning over time in MS eyes with and without a prior history of acute optic neuritis (ON).Patients (...) underwent OCT measurement of RNFL thickness at baseline and at 6-month intervals during a mean follow-up of 18 months at 3 centers. Low-contrast letter acuity (2.5%, 1.25% contrast) and visual acuity (VA) were assessed.Among 299 patients (593 eyes) with >or=6 months follow-up, eyes with visual loss showed greater RNFL thinning compared to eyes with stable vision (low-contrast acuity, 2.5%: p < 0.001; VA: p = 0.005). RNFL thinning increased over time, with average losses of 2.9microm at 2 to 3 years

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2010 Annals of Neurology

192. Cerebral palsy in adults

or or a neurosurgical or orthopaedic procedure is being considered that may affect their ability to carry out their usual daily activities. 1.1.2 Recognise that reassessment by the multidisciplinary team may be needed by adults with cerebral palsy at different points in their lives to ensure that their changing needs are met (for example, pregnancy and parenting, decreased mobility due to hip arthritis, and loss of care and support from a parent). 1.1.3 Commissioners and service providers should develop pathways (...) enteral muscle relaxants) with a tone management specialist. Cerebral palsy in adults (NG119) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 15 of 641.3.9 Do not offer diazepam for spasticity in adults with cerebral palsy, except in an acute situation when spasticity is causing severe pain or anxiety. 1.3.10 Do not rapidly withdraw muscle relaxant drugs, particularly if adults with cerebral palsy have taken them

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

193. Stroke and transient ischaemic attack in over 16s: diagnosis and initial management

to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 38Contents Contents Overview 4 Who is it for? 4 Recommendations 5 1.1 Rapid recognition of symptoms and diagnosis 5 1.2 Imaging for people who have had a suspected TIA or acute non-disabling stroke 6 1.3 Specialist care for people with acute stroke 7 1.4 Pharmacological treatments and thrombectomy for people with acute stroke 8 1.5 Maintenance or restoration of homeostasis 12 1.6 Nutrition and hydration 14 (...) 1.7 Optimal positioning and early mobilisation for people with acute stroke 16 1.8 Avoiding aspiration pneumonia 17 1.9 Surgery for people with acute stroke 17 T erms used in this guideline 18 Recommendations for research 21 Key recommendations for research 21 Rationale and impact 22 Initial management of suspected and confirmed transient ischaemic attack (aspirin) 22 Initial management of suspected and confirmed transient ischaemic attack 22 Imaging for people who have had a suspected TIA

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

194. Suspected neurological conditions: recognition and referral

or taste problems 20 1.13 Speech, swallowing and language problems in adults 21 1.14 Tics and involuntary movements in adults 22 1.15 Tremor in adults 23 1.16 Information and support 24 Recommendations for children aged under 16 25 1.17 Attention, concentration and memory problems 25 1.18 Blackouts and other paroxysmal events 25 1.19 Confusion, acute 26 1.20 Dizziness and vertigo in children 27 1.21 Headaches in children 28 1.22 Head shape or size abnormalities 30 1.23 Hypotonia ('floppiness') 32 (...) and support 56 Rationale: recommendations for children aged under 16 57 Attention, concentration and memory problems 57 Blackouts and other paroxysmal events 58 Confusion, acute 59 Dizziness and vertigo in children 59 Headaches in children 60 Head shape or size abnormalities 62 Hypotonia ('floppiness') 63 Limb or facial weakness in children 63 Motor development delay and unsteadiness 64 Posture distortion in children 65 Sensory symptoms such as tingling or numbness in children 66 Sleep disorders

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

195. Brain tumours (primary) and brain metastases in adults

Radiotherap apy y No r No radiother adiotherap apy y Control of Control of tumour tumour There is evidence that radiotherapy is effective in the local control of a tumour. Receiving no radiotherapy means the tumour may continue to grow. Risk of Risk of de dev veloping eloping subsequent subsequent symptoms symptoms Controlling the tumour will reduce the risk of developing symptoms from the tumour in the future. If the tumour grows, it can cause irreversible symptoms such as loss of vision. Risk of re (...) -of-rights). Page 20 of 60Early side Early side effects of effects of treatment treatment Early side effects from radiotherapy can include: fatigue hair loss headache nausea seizures skin irritation. No side effects from treatment. Late side effects Late side effects of treatment of treatment Late side effects from radiotherapy can include: effect on cognition risk of stroke risk of radionecrosis risk of second tumours cranial nerve effects hypopituitarism cataracts. No side effects from treatment

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

196. Assessment of ataxia

of causes of ataxia is extensive. Typically, when considering a differential diagnosis, ataxia is classified on the basis of whether it is acute, subacute, or chronic. Ataxia may also be classified by age of onset (childhood vs. adult), whether it is hereditary or acquired, and whether it is associated with other clinical features (e.g., seizures, dystonia, vision loss). Degenerative ataxia is the term used to denote ataxia related to cerebellar atrophy of both genetic and unknown causation. Other terms (...) syndrome Sequel to hypoxic encephalopathy or heat stroke Acute cerebellitis HIV Gerstmann-Straussler syndrome Creutzfeldt-Jakob syndrome (CJD) (ataxic variant) Cerebellar abscess Whipple's disease Posterior fossa tumours Craniovertebral junction anomalies Paraneoplastic sensory neuropathy Ataxia with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies Coeliac disease Myoclonus-opsoclonus syndrome Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration Miller-Fisher syndrome Sjogren's syndrome Neuropathy related

2019 BMJ Best Practice

197. Multiple sclerosis

, with temporary visual or sensory loss. However, may affect either sex and any age or ethnic group, and may have variable neurological symptom location and/or duration. May have subtle changes in vision, ambulation, and reflexes on examination that provide evidence of previous attacks (which may not have been noticed by the patient). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is sensitive, but very susceptible to over-interpretation in the absence of clinical correlation. Spinal MRI is abnormal less often (...) , but lends greater specificity when present with brain lesions. Treatment of the condition can be divided into three parts: treatment of the acute attack; prevention of future attacks by reducing triggers and use of disease-modifying therapies; and symptomatic treatments of neurological difficulties such as spasticity, pain, fatigue, and bladder dysfunction. Definition Multiple sclerosis (MS) is defined as an inflammatory demyelinating disease characterised by the presence of episodic neurological

2019 BMJ Best Practice

198. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

sensory loss, and absent reflexes. History and exam disease progression weakness altered sensation decreased deep tendon reflexes incoordination age 40 to 60 years preceding infection absence of exposure to neuropathy-causing drugs dyspnoea facial weakness dysarthria dysphagia urinary incontinence urinary urgency or hesitancy impotence orthostatic hypotension papilloedema vision loss spasticity ataxia male sex autoimmune diseases diabetes infection monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (...) (MGUS) Diagnostic investigations nerve conduction studies (NCS) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) evaluation nerve biopsy MRI spine nerve ultrasound enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or Western blot to detect auto-antibodies clinical trial of immunosuppressant Treatment algorithm ACUTE ONGOING Contributors Authors Professor of Neurology Department of Neurology Washington University School of Medicine St. Louis MO Disclosures GL is on the medical advisory board for Alnylam Pharmaceuticals

2019 BMJ Best Practice

199. Parkinson?s disease in adults

diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes. [2006, amended 2017] [2006, amended 2017] Acute le Acute lev vodopa and apomorphine challenge tests odopa and apomorphine challenge tests 1.2.13 Do not use acute levodopa and apomorphine challenge tests in the differential diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes. [2006, amended 2017] [2006, amended 2017] Objectiv Objective smell testing e smell testing 1.2.14 Do not use objective smell testing in the differential diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes, except in the context (...) : MAO-B, monoamine oxidase B. * Excessive sleepiness, hallucinations and impulse control disorders (see the summary of product characteristics for full information on individual medicines). 1.3.2 Antiparkinsonian medicines should not be withdrawn abruptly or allowed to fail suddenly due to poor absorption (for example, gastroenteritis, abdominal surgery) to avoid the potential for acute akinesia or neuroleptic malignant syndrome. [2006] [2006] 1.3.3 The practice of withdrawing people from

2017 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

200. Cerebral palsy in under 25s: assessment and management

(loss of the part of usual field of vision). 1.17.6 If concerns about visual impairment are raised by parents, carers or members of the care team, consider referring the child or young person with cerebral palsy to a specialist team for evaluation of the whole visual system (including eye health, eye movements, refraction, squint and visual acuity), especially if there are communication difficulties. 1.17.7 Regularly assess children and young people with cerebral palsy for signs of cerebral visual (...) of these are observed: absence of known risk factors (see recommendation 1.1.1) family history of a progressive neurological disorder loss of already attained cognitive or developmental abilities development of unexpected focal neurological signs MRI findings suggestive of a progressive neurological disorder MRI findings not in keeping with clinical signs of cerebral palsy. 1.5 Multidisciplinary care 1.5.1 Refer all children with suspected cerebral palsy to a child development service for an urgent

2017 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

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