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Acute Otitis Media Observation

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141. Antibiotic prescription strategies for acute sore throat: a prospective observational cohort study. (Abstract)

Antibiotic prescription strategies for acute sore throat: a prospective observational cohort study. Data from trials suggest that antibiotics reduce the risk of complications of sore throat by at least 50%, but few trials for complications have been done in modern settings, and datasets of delayed antibiotic prescription are underpowered. Observational evidence is important in view of poor compliance with antibiotic treatment outside trials, but no prospective observational cohort studies have (...) for the propensity to prescribe antibiotics. Information about antibiotic prescription was recorded in 12,677 individuals (4805 prescribed no antibiotics, 6088 prescribed antibiotics immediately, and 1784 prescribed delayed antibiotics). We documented by review of patients' notes (n=11,950) the development of suppurative complications (eg, quinsy, impetigo and cellulitis, otitis media, and sinusitis) or reconsultation with new or non-resolving symptoms). We used multivariate analysis to control for variables

2014 Lancet infectious diseases

142. Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence

Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence ACUTE PAIN MANAGEMENT: SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE Fourth Edition 2015 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists and Faculty of Pain Medicine Edited by: Stephan A Schug Greta M Palmer David A Scott Richard Halliwell Jane T rinca© Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists 2015 ISBN Print: 978-0-9873236-7-5 Online: 978-0-9873236-6-8 This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced (...) and Faculty of Pain Medicine (2015), Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence (4th edition), ANZCA & FPM, Melbourne. Copyright information for Tables 10.1 and 10.2 The material presented in Table 10.1 and Table 10.2 of this document has been reproduced with permission from Prescribing Medicines in Pregnancy, 2015, Therapeutic Goods Administration. It does not purport to be the official or authorised version. © Commonwealth of Australia 2015 This work is copyright. You may download, display, print

2015 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

143. Risk of acute otitis media in relation to acute bronchiolitis in children. (Abstract)

Risk of acute otitis media in relation to acute bronchiolitis in children. A prospective study was carried out to evaluate the prevalence and the etiology of acute otitis media (AOM) in children with acute bronchiolitis. Also to determine whether AOM occurring with acute bronchiolitis is accompanied with another pathogens or not.One hundred and eighty children with acute bronchiolitis aged 3-18 months who were admitted to pediatrics department, Minia University hospital, were included (...) in the study done in the winter and spring of 2009. In patients with AOM at entry or developed AOM within 14 days, Gram-stained smears, bacterial cultures, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were performed on middle-ear aspirates to detect the presence of bacterial pathogens and RSV respectively.One hundred children (55.6%) with acute bronchiolitis had AOM at entry or developed AOM within 14 days, 45 patients (25%) had developed otitis media with effusion, and only 35 patients (19.4%) remained

2011 International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

144. Respiratory Microbiota Predicts Clinical Disease Course of Acute Otorrhea in Children With Tympanostomy Tubes. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Respiratory Microbiota Predicts Clinical Disease Course of Acute Otorrhea in Children With Tympanostomy Tubes. Acute otitis media (AOM) is one of the most common childhood infections, generally thought to be caused by ascension of bacteria from the nasopharynx (NP) to the middle ear. Using 16S rRNA-based sequencing, we evaluated the relationship between the NP and middle ear fluid (MEF) microbiota in children with acute otitis media with tympanostomy tubes (AOMT) as a proxy for AOM (...) , and explored whether microbiota profiling predicts natural disease course.Microbiota profiles of paired NP and MEF samples of 94 children aged below five years with uncomplicated AOMT were determined.Local diversity (p<0·001) and overall microbiota composition (p<0·001) of NP and MEF samples differed significantly, though paired NP and MEF samples were much more similar than unpaired samples (p<0·001). High qualitative agreement between the presence of individual bacteria in both niches was observed

2018 Pediatric Infectious Dsease Journal

145. Clinical Trial of Efficacy and Safety of Anaferon in the Treatment of Acute Respiratory Viral Infections

minutes before eating), should be kept in your mouth, not swallowed, until it is dissolved completely. Outcome Measures Go to Primary Outcome Measures : Time to acute respiratory viral infection symptoms resolution [ Time Frame: On days 1-7 of observation ] Acute respiratory viral infection is clinically diagnosed and / or PCR confirmed Secondary Outcome Measures : Severity of the Disease [ Time Frame: On days 1-6 of observation ] Disease is clinically diagnosed and / or PCR confirmed. Severity (...) of the Disease will be assessed using the "Area under the curve" for the Total Symptom Score (TSS). Percentage of patients with acute respiratory viral infection symptoms resolution [ Time Frame: On days 1-7 of observation ] Acute respiratory viral infection is clinically diagnosed and / or PCR confirmed Time to acute respiratory viral infection symptoms resolution [ Time Frame: On days 1-7 of observation ] Acute respiratory viral infection is PCR confirmed Percentage of patients with acute respiratory viral

2018 Clinical Trials

146. The Impact of the Heptavalent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine on the Epidemiology of Acute Otitis Media Complicated by Otorrhea. (Abstract)

The Impact of the Heptavalent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine on the Epidemiology of Acute Otitis Media Complicated by Otorrhea. The heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) has a considerable effect on the epidemiology of pneumococcal disease. The aim of this observational hospital-based study was to examine the effect of the PCV7 (introduced in our settings in 2004) on the epidemiology of spontaneously draining acute otitis media.Results of all middle ear fluid cultures (n = 3446 (...) ) obtained from children with acute otitis media complicated with otorrhea before the introduction of immunization (between 2000 and 2003) were compared with those (n = 2134) obtained during a similar post-PCV7 period (between 2005 and 2008). Results of cultures obtained between 2006 and 2008 were examined prospectively, whereas those obtained in previous years were retrospectively reviewed.Following PCV7 immunization, the rates of otorrhea visits per 10,000 emergency department visits decreased by 38

2011 Pediatric Infectious Dsease Journal

147. To Evaluate the Incidence of Acute Otitis Media in Children in Five East European Countries

for study information Study Type : Observational Actual Enrollment : 2258 participants Observational Model: Cohort Official Title: To Evaluate Incidence of Acute Otitis Media in Children Aged < 6 Years in Five East European Countries Study Start Date : June 2011 Actual Primary Completion Date : December 2012 Actual Study Completion Date : December 2012 Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine related topics: Groups and Cohorts Go to Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment Cohort (...) To Evaluate the Incidence of Acute Otitis Media in Children in Five East European Countries To Evaluate the Incidence of Acute Otitis Media in Children in Five East European Countries - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more

2011 Clinical Trials

148. A simple scoring system to improve clinical assessment of acute otitis media. (Abstract)

A simple scoring system to improve clinical assessment of acute otitis media. To evaluate an easy to use 10-point scoring system in clinical assessment of acute otitis media (AOM). Study design. Symptoms of AOM observed by validated otoscopists were tabulated and scored with a 10-point and a 30-point system at acute onset of illness and at the test-of-cure (TOC) 3 weeks later.A total of 330 children (mean age = 13.1 months) with AOM were studied. At AOM onset, the mean 10-point and 30-point

2011 Clinical pediatrics Controlled trial quality: uncertain

149. Tissue remodeling in the acute otitis media mouse model. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Tissue remodeling in the acute otitis media mouse model. Otitis media is an infectious, inflammatory process involving the middle ear space. Chronic inflammation is associated with fibrosis, scarring and osteogenesis within the middle ear, which may contribute to subsequent hearing loss and increase the difficulty of treatment.Heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae was injected into the middle ears of 8-12 week old Balb/c mice. Control mice were treated with PBS middle ear injections. Middle ears (...) were harvested at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days following injection (n=8 for each time point). The middle ears were processed using standard RT-PCR techniques. Up- and down-regulation of mRNA expression of various members of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP), Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) and Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP) families was quantified and compared to PBS treated controls (n=8 for each time point).Significant upregulation of MMP2, MMP3 and MMP9 was observed at varying time points (p<0.05

2011 International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

150. Otitis Media (Secretory)

to Remove Earwax Video How to Treat Nosebleeds (Epistaxis) SOCIAL MEDIA Add to Any Platform Loading , MD, MS, Indiana University School of Medicine Click here for Patient Education NOTE: This is the Professional Version. CONSUMERS: Topic Resources Secretory otitis media is an effusion in the middle ear resulting from incomplete resolution of acute otitis media or obstruction of the eustachian tube without infection. Symptoms include hearing loss and a sense of fullness or pressure in the ear. Diagnosis (...) and in the Rosenmüller fossa, or benign or malignant tumors. The effusion may be sterile or (more commonly) contain pathogenic bacteria sometimes as a biofilm, although inflammation is not observed. Symptoms and Signs Patients may report no symptoms, but some (or their family members) note hearing loss. Patients may experience a feeling of fullness, pressure, or popping in the ear with swallowing. Otalgia is rare. Secretory Otitis Media TONY WRIGHT, INSTITUTE OF LARYNGOLOGY AND OTOLOGY/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Various

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

151. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Diagnosis and Management of Acute Bacterial Sinusitis in Children Aged 1 to 18 Years

in this revision include the addition of a clinical presentation designated as “worsening course,” an option to treat immediately or observe children with persistent symptoms for 3 days before treating, and a review of evidence indicating that imaging is not necessary in children with uncomplicated acute bacterial sinusitis. Abbreviations: AAP — American Academy of Pediatrics AOM — acute otitis media CT — computed tomography PCV-13 — 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine RABS — recurrent acute bacterial (...) bacterial species was observed within the group of children treated with a single course of antimicrobial agents (compared with those receiving placebo) in 2 recent large studies of antibiotic versus placebo for children with acute otitis media. , Key Action Statement 4 Clinicians should prescribe amoxicillin with or without clavulanate as first-line treatment when a decision has been made to initiate antibiotic treatment of acute bacterial sinusitis (Evidence Q uality: B; Recommendation). KAS Profile 4

2013 American Academy of Pediatrics

152. IDSA Clinical Practice Guideline for Acute Bacterial Rhinosinusitis in Children and Adults Full Text available with Trip Pro

of fever, a relapse or an increase in nasal discharge or cough, or the onset of severe headache. This double-sickening is a classic presentation for any secondary bacterial complication of a viral URI similar to ABRS, such as acute otitis media (AOM) and pneumonia. The validity of these clinical features in predicting ABRS is discussed in the “Evidence Summary” of recommendation 1 in the guideline. Issues in RCTs of Antimicrobial Therapy for Presumed ABRS Five systematic reviews or meta-analyses (...) IDSA Clinical Practice Guideline for Acute Bacterial Rhinosinusitis in Children and Adults We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. IDSA Clinical Practice Guideline for Acute Bacterial Rhinosinusitis in Children and Adults | Clinical Infectious Diseases | Oxford Academic Search Account Menu Menu Navbar Search Filter Mobile Microsite Search Term Close search

2012 Infectious Diseases Society of America

153. The Australian guideline for prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

The Australian guideline for prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease The Australian guideline for prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease (2nd edition)Lead authors Professor Jonathan Carapetis (Chair); Professor Alex Brown; Associate Professor Graeme Maguire; Dr Warren Walsh Ms Sara Noonan; Mr Dale Thompson (Coordination and Secretariat) Major contributors Mr Marc Rémond; Dr Bo Remenyi; Dr Andrew (...) are reserved. Enquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed to info@rhdaustralia.org.au Suggested citation RHDAustralia (ARF/RHD writing group), National Heart Foundation of Australia and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand. Australian guideline for prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease (2nd edition). 2012 ISBN 978-0-9587722-9-7 (paperback) 978-0-9587722-5-9 (online) Disclaimer This publication was funded by the Australian

2012 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

154. Risk Factors for Outpatient Use of Antibiotics in Children with Acute Respiratory Illnesses Full Text available with Trip Pro

for streptococcal pharyngitis, 15 for acute otitis media (AOM), and 2 for pneumonia. Discharge diagnoses were the only factors independently associated with an antibiotic prescription. Of children prescribed/not prescribed an antibiotic, 17%/17% received follow-up telephone calls and 27%/17% had follow-up visits related to ARI within 30 days. Two children with AOM were prescribed a second antibiotic during follow-up, and one developed Clostridium difficile colitis. Eighteen of 206 (9%) additional children were (...) Risk Factors for Outpatient Use of Antibiotics in Children with Acute Respiratory Illnesses Antibiotics for acute respiratory illness (ARI) constitute most pediatric medication use and contribute to the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. We investigated antibiotic prescription risk factors for ARI in pediatric clinics and clinical follow-up in individuals prescribed and not prescribed antibiotics.In this observational study, we enrolled children ages 2 to 17 years old presenting with ARI

2017 Southern medical journal

155. Extended-Release Guaifenesin/Pseudoephedrine Hydrochloride for Symptom Relief in Support of a Wait-and-See Approach for the Treatment of Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infections: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study Full Text available with Trip Pro

for the treatment of acute childhood ear infections, was as quick, safe, and effective in resolving the infections as an AB prescription (Spiro DM, Tay KY, Arnold DH, Dziura JD, Baker MD, Shapiro ED. Wait-and-See Prescription for the Treatment of Acute Otitis Media. JAMA 2006; 296:1235-1241).To try and reduce inappropriate prescribing practices, a wait and see or delayed approach requires patients to return for a prescription if their symptoms persist or worsen. The aim of this study was to determine whether (...) Extended-Release Guaifenesin/Pseudoephedrine Hydrochloride for Symptom Relief in Support of a Wait-and-See Approach for the Treatment of Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infections: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study Despite the well-known fact that antibiotics (AB) are not effective against viruses, many patients ask for - and all too often doctors provide - AB for treating URTIs. Over-prescribing of AB is one of the key causes for the development of bacterial resistance, which

2017 Current therapeutic research, clinical and experimental Controlled trial quality: predicted high

156. Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Andrographolide Sulfonate in Patients With Acute Tonsillitis

complete disappearance of in the tonsils time from admission to recovery of fever [ Time Frame: less than 7 days ] In the absence of other antipyretic drugs, the time from Xiyangping injection beganning to use to Axillary temperature below 37.5℃ , and last more than 24 hours without fever. the incidence of complications [ Time Frame: less than 7 days ] Such as, the incidence of Acute otitis media, acute rhinitis, acute bronchitis, acute bronchitis,and so on. bacterial eradication rate [ Time Frame (...) Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Andrographolide Sulfonate in Patients With Acute Tonsillitis Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Andrographolide Sulfonate in Patients With Acute Tonsillitis - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one

2017 Clinical Trials

157. A Study of Andrographolide Sulfonate in Patients With Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Bronchitis

Frame: less than 14 days ] oral anti infective drugs use days and intravenous anti infective drugs use days are recorded the incidence of complications [ Time Frame: less than 14 days ] such as, the incidence of Acute otitis media, acute rhinitis, acute bronchitis, acute bronchitis, and so on. bacterial eradication rate [ Time Frame: less than 14 days ] bacterial eradication rate=Sputum culture negative cases after treatment /sputum culture positive cases before treatment x 100% =Sputum culture (...) A Study of Andrographolide Sulfonate in Patients With Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Bronchitis A Study of Andrographolide Sulfonate in Patients With Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Bronchitis - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one

2017 Clinical Trials

158. Reduction of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus pharyngo-tonsillar infections associated with use of the oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12: a retrospective observational study Full Text available with Trip Pro

. Of these children, 76 then undertook a 90-day program requiring once-a-day dosing with a commercially available (Bactoblis) lozenge containing SsK12. No probiotic supplement was given to the remaining 54 (control) children. Each subject was monitored for the occurrence of GABHS pharyngo-tonsillitis and also for acute otitis media, bronchitis, sinusitis, and bronchopneumonia for at least 12 months following their entry to the study. Even 9 months after the use of SsK12 had been stopped, the probability of new (...) Reduction of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus pharyngo-tonsillar infections associated with use of the oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12: a retrospective observational study Recurrent pharyngo-tonsillar infections caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS) occur frequently in young children, and the treatment of these infections contributes substantially to the total current requirement for antibiotic prescribing. Our study goal was to assess through a retrospective

2016 Therapeutics and clinical risk management

159. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute and chronic rhinosinusitis

LRs were 1.89 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06 to 3.39) for symptom duration longer than 10 days, 1.47 (CI, 0.93 to 2.32) for purulent nasal secretions on history, 2.11 (CI, 1.23 to 3.63) for oropharyngeal red streak in the lateral pharyngeal recess, 1.89 (CI, 1.08 to 3.32) for transillumination, and 1.22 (CI, 0.08 to 18.64) for otitis media. Although transillumination is not considered accurate in the diagnosis of acute rhinosinusitis (ARS),[ ] visualization of purulent secretions from (...) Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute and chronic rhinosinusitis Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute and chronic rhinosinusitis | Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology | Full Text Advertisement Menu Search Search all BMC articles Search Menu We'd love your feedback. Please complete this 3 question Table of Contents , Gerald A Evans , Paul K Keith , Erin D Wright , Alan Kaplan , Jacques Bouchard , Anthony Ciavarella , Patrick W Doyle , Amin R Javer , Eric S Leith , Atreyi

2011 CPG Infobase

160. Multi-species bacterial biofilm and intracellular infection in otitis media. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Multi-species bacterial biofilm and intracellular infection in otitis media. Bacteria which are metabolically active yet unable to be cultured and eradicated by antibiotic treatment are present in the middle ear effusion of children with chronic otitis media with effusion (COME) and recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM). These observations are suggestive of biofilm presence or intracellular sequestration of bacteria and may play a role in OM pathogenesis. The aim of this project is to provide (...) implant surgery was also examined.No bacteria were observed in the healthy control sample. In 2 of the 3 biopsies imaged using TEM, bacteria were observed in mucus containing vacuoles within epithelial cells. Bacterial species within these could not be identified and biofilm was not observed. Using FISH with CLSM, bacteria were seen in 15 of the 17 otitis media mucosal specimens. In this group, 11 (65%) of the 17 middle ear mucosal biopsies showed evidence of bacterial biofilm and 12 demonstrated

2011 BMC Pediatrics

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