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Acute Otitis Media Observation

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121. Pediatrics, Otitis Media (Follow-up)

Treatment or Observation in Children With Acute Otitis Media [ ] Age Certain Diagnosis Uncertain Diagnosis < 6 mo Antibacterial therapy Antibacterial therapy 6 mo–2 y Antibacterial therapy Antibacterial therapy if severe illness; observation option* if nonsevere illness ≥2 y Antibacterial therapy if severe illness; observation option* if nonsevere illness Observation option* *Observation is an appropriate option only when follow-up can be ensured and antibacterial agents started if symptoms persist (...) . 2004 Jun 1. 69(11):2713-5. . Chao JH, Kunkov S, Reyes LB, Lichten S, Crain EF. Comparison of two approaches to observation therapy for acute otitis media in the emergency department. Pediatrics . 2008 May. 121(5):e1352-6. . Spiro DM, Tay KY, Arnold DH, Dziura JD, Baker MD, Shapiro ED. Wait-and-see prescription for the treatment of acute otitis media: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA . 2006 Sep 13. 296(10):1235-41. . Fischer T, Singer AJ, Lee C, Thode HC Jr. National trends in emergency

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

122. Pediatrics, Otitis Media (Diagnosis)

Treatment or Observation in Children With Acute Otitis Media [ ] Age Certain Diagnosis Uncertain Diagnosis < 6 mo Antibacterial therapy Antibacterial therapy 6 mo–2 y Antibacterial therapy Antibacterial therapy if severe illness; observation option* if nonsevere illness ≥2 y Antibacterial therapy if severe illness; observation option* if nonsevere illness Observation option* *Observation is an appropriate option only when follow-up can be ensured and antibacterial agents started if symptoms persist (...) . 2004 Jun 1. 69(11):2713-5. . Chao JH, Kunkov S, Reyes LB, Lichten S, Crain EF. Comparison of two approaches to observation therapy for acute otitis media in the emergency department. Pediatrics . 2008 May. 121(5):e1352-6. . Spiro DM, Tay KY, Arnold DH, Dziura JD, Baker MD, Shapiro ED. Wait-and-see prescription for the treatment of acute otitis media: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA . 2006 Sep 13. 296(10):1235-41. . Fischer T, Singer AJ, Lee C, Thode HC Jr. National trends in emergency

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

123. Otitis Media (Diagnosis)

Treatment or Observation in Children With Acute Otitis Media [ ] Age Certain Diagnosis Uncertain Diagnosis < 6 mo Antibacterial therapy Antibacterial therapy 6 mo–2 y Antibacterial therapy Antibacterial therapy if severe illness; observation option* if nonsevere illness ≥2 y Antibacterial therapy if severe illness; observation option* if nonsevere illness Observation option* *Observation is an appropriate option only when follow-up can be ensured and antibacterial agents started if symptoms persist (...) . 2004 Jun 1. 69(11):2713-5. . Chao JH, Kunkov S, Reyes LB, Lichten S, Crain EF. Comparison of two approaches to observation therapy for acute otitis media in the emergency department. Pediatrics . 2008 May. 121(5):e1352-6. . Spiro DM, Tay KY, Arnold DH, Dziura JD, Baker MD, Shapiro ED. Wait-and-see prescription for the treatment of acute otitis media: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA . 2006 Sep 13. 296(10):1235-41. . Fischer T, Singer AJ, Lee C, Thode HC Jr. National trends in emergency

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

124. Otitis Media (Diagnosis)

: Muhammad Waseem, MBBS, MS, FAAP, FACEP, FAHA; Chief Editor: Ravindhra G Elluru, MD, PhD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Otitis Media Overview Practice Essentials Otitis media (OM) is any inflammation of the middle ear (see the images below), without reference to etiology or pathogenesis. It is very common in children. Acute otitis media with purulent effusion behind a bulging tympanic membrane. Chronic otitis media with a retraction pocket of the pars flaccida. There are several (...) subtypes of OM, as follows: Acute OM (AOM) OM with effusion (OME) Chronic suppurative OM Adhesive OM Signs and symptoms AOM implies rapid onset of disease associated with one or more of the following symptoms: Otalgia Otorrhea Headache Fever Irritability Loss of appetite Vomiting Diarrhea OME often follows an episode of AOM. Symptoms that may be indicative of OME include the following: Hearing loss Tinnitus Vertigo Otalgia Chronic suppurative otitis media is a persistent ear infection that results

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

125. Otitis Media (Follow-up)

& Management Updated: Mar 19, 2018 Author: Muhammad Waseem, MBBS, MS, FAAP, FACEP, FAHA; Chief Editor: Ravindhra G Elluru, MD, PhD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Otitis Media Treatment Medical Care Medical management of otitis media (OM) is actively debated in the medical literature, primarily because of a dramatic increase in acute OM (AOM) prevalence over the past 10 years caused by drug-resistant S pneumoniae (DRSP) and beta-lactamase–producing H influenzae or M catarrhalis . Beta (...) with AOM. Medical therapy for acute otitis media In 1999, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) therapeutic working group on DRSP published consensus recommendations for AOM management. [ ] The recommendations supported the use of amoxicillin as the first-line antimicrobial agent of choice in patients with AOM. The group recommended increasing the dose used for empiric treatment from 40-45 mg/kg/day to 80-90 mg/kg/day because of concerns about increasingly resistant strains of S

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

126. Otitis Media (Overview)

than 102.2°F); evidence quality: grade B Previous Next: Table: Criteria for Initial Antibacterial Treatment Studies have also shown that, despite adequate access to clinical guidelines, the prescribing rates for antibiotics in acute otitis media (AOM) in some emergency departments remain high. [ , ] (In accordance with the guidelines, however, administration of amoxicillin and analgesics has increased.) [ ] Table 1. Criteria for Initial Antibacterial Agent Treatment or Observation in Children (...) With Acute Otitis Media [ ] Age Certain Diagnosis Uncertain Diagnosis < 6 mo Antibacterial therapy Antibacterial therapy 6 mo–2 y Antibacterial therapy Antibacterial therapy if severe illness; observation option* if nonsevere illness ≥2 y Antibacterial therapy if severe illness; observation option* if nonsevere illness Observation option* *Observation is an appropriate option only when follow-up can be ensured and antibacterial agents started if symptoms persist or worsen. Nonsevere illness is mild

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

127. Pediatrics, Otitis Media (Overview)

Treatment or Observation in Children With Acute Otitis Media [ ] Age Certain Diagnosis Uncertain Diagnosis < 6 mo Antibacterial therapy Antibacterial therapy 6 mo–2 y Antibacterial therapy Antibacterial therapy if severe illness; observation option* if nonsevere illness ≥2 y Antibacterial therapy if severe illness; observation option* if nonsevere illness Observation option* *Observation is an appropriate option only when follow-up can be ensured and antibacterial agents started if symptoms persist (...) . 2004 Jun 1. 69(11):2713-5. . Chao JH, Kunkov S, Reyes LB, Lichten S, Crain EF. Comparison of two approaches to observation therapy for acute otitis media in the emergency department. Pediatrics . 2008 May. 121(5):e1352-6. . Spiro DM, Tay KY, Arnold DH, Dziura JD, Baker MD, Shapiro ED. Wait-and-see prescription for the treatment of acute otitis media: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA . 2006 Sep 13. 296(10):1235-41. . Fischer T, Singer AJ, Lee C, Thode HC Jr. National trends in emergency

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

128. The Collaborative Assessment, OTCA12, on “C-reactive protein point-of-care testing (CRP POCT) to guide antibiotic prescribing in primary care settings for acute respiratory tract infections (RTIs)

OF BIAS FOR ANALYTICAL PERFORMANCE 234 FIGURE A6: RISK OF BIAS OF INCLUDED STUDIES IN SYSTEMATIC REVIEW 3 (ANALYTICAL PERFORMANCE) 235 C-reactive protein point-of-care testing to guide antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in primary care EUnetHTA Joint Action 3 WP4 8 LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS ADR adverse drug reaction AMR antimicrobial resistance AOM acute otitis media AUC area under the curve BMI body mass index CAP community-acquired pneumonia CE Conformité Européenne CI (...) are caused by bacteria and may respond to antibiotics. Depending on the site of infec- tion, RTIs may be classified as upper (pharyngitis, tonsillitis, laryngitis, rhinosinusitis, otitis media and the common cold) or lower (pneumonia, bronchitis, tracheitis and acute infective exacerba- tions of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]). Influenza may affect both the upper and lower respiratory tract. (A0002) Most RTIs are self-limiting. The natural course of upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs

2019 EUnetHTA

129. Efficacy of KNT&#174; (KINETUBE) in Recurrent Chronic Otitis Media in Children

: January 16, 2014 Last Update Posted : January 16, 2014 Sponsor: Assistance Publique Hopitaux De Marseille Information provided by (Responsible Party): Assistance Publique Hopitaux De Marseille Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Otitis media are the consequence of bacterial infection. They are characterized by middle ear inflammations with a collection of fluid behind the eardrum. The effusion stagnates in the middle ear, can increase acute infection and induce tympanic membrane (...) and inner ear damages. Delay in language learning can be observed in affected children as well as hearing problems e.g. constant hearing loss. The two main forms of chronic otitis are otitis media with effusion (OME) and atelectasis with or without retraction pockets. To date, insertion of tympanic ventilation tubes (tympanostomy) is the most effective treatment for otitis media with effusion that has failed to respond to conservative drug treatments; and for delaying the progression of serious

2013 Clinical Trials

130. The pathology of silent otitis media: A predecessor to tympanogenic meningitis in infants. Full Text available with Trip Pro

The pathology of silent otitis media: A predecessor to tympanogenic meningitis in infants. To determine the association of bacteria embedded within a fibrous matrix in the middle and inner ear in infants with tympanogenic meningitis.Thirty-one cases with meningitis from the human temporal bone collection at the University of Minnesota were screened to select those with tympanogenic meningitis. Inclusion criteria for tympanogenic meningitis were acute meningitis with histopathological evidence (...) of chronic otitis media, and no other source of infection. The presence of labyrinthitis and pathologic changes such as granulation tissue, fibrosis, cholesterol granuloma, cholesteatoma, tympanic membrane perforation, tympanosclerosis, and the type of effusion were noted. The extent and location of bacteria embedded in a fibrous matrix were also explored.Seventeen temporal bones, from nine cases that included two females and seven males, ranging in age from five to twenty-three months, met our criteria

2013 International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

131. Stenting of the eustachian tube to prevent otitis media with effusion after maxillary swing approach nasopharyngectomy. (Abstract)

Stenting of the eustachian tube to prevent otitis media with effusion after maxillary swing approach nasopharyngectomy. Our previous report recommended that the management of ipsilateral otitis media with effusion (OME) after maxillary swing nasopharyngectomy was observation. The idea of introducing a stent into the eustachian tube (ET) at the nasopharyngeal side after nasopharyngectomy may prevent postoperative OME. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of intraoperative ET (...) , and tympanogram at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after the surgery. The outcomes were analyzed and compared with historical control.There were 9 (43%) patients with no OME at 6 months after surgery, and 15 (71%) patients had no OME at 1 year postoperatively. The results were statistically significant (P < .0001) when compared with our historical control of no ET stenting. There was no incidence of adverse effects of the stenting, such as acute otitis media, dislodgement of the stent, otalgia, and nasal

2013 Laryngoscope

132. Bioluminescent imaging of pneumococcal otitis media in chinchillas. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Bioluminescent imaging of pneumococcal otitis media in chinchillas. Bioluminescent imaging has emerged as a powerful tool for monitoring the pathological process of infections in animals. The purpose of this study was to harness this new tool for objective assessment of acute otitis media (AOM) in animals with and without antibiotic interventions.Thirty-six healthy chinchillas, free of middle ear infections, were randomly divided into a control group and a group that received amoxicillin (...) treatment. Bioluminescent Streptococcus pneumoniae (Xen 10) was injected into the epitympanic bullae of chinchillas (50 colony-forming units each) for induction of AOM. The infectious process of Xen 10 in the bullae of living animals with and without antibiotic interventions was monitored in real time with bioluminescence equipment.A dynamic change of bioluminescent signals in the bullae of chinchillas from days 1 to 14 was observed after Xen 10 injection. Amoxicillin treatment reduced

2013 Rhinology and Laryngology

133. Antibiotic exposure and 'response failure' for subsequent respiratory tract infections: an observational cohort study of UK preschool children in primary care. Full Text available with Trip Pro

infections (RTI), in the preceding year, and subsequent RTIs that failed to respond to antibiotic treatment ('response failures').A cohort study using UK primary care data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, 2009 to 2016.Children aged 12 to 60 months (1 to 5 years) who were prescribed an antibiotic for an acute RTI (upper and lower RTI or otitis media) were included. One random index antibiotic course for RTI per child was selected. Exposure was the number of antibiotic prescriptions for acute (...) Antibiotic exposure and 'response failure' for subsequent respiratory tract infections: an observational cohort study of UK preschool children in primary care. Childhood antibiotic exposure has important clinically relevant implications. These include disruption to the microbiome, antibiotic resistance, and clinical workload manifesting as treatment 'failure'.To examine the relationship between the number of antibiotic courses prescribed to preschool children for acute respiratory tract

2019 British Journal of General Practice

134. Antibiotic prescribing quality for children in primary care: an observational study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

, including children attending primary care sites in England and Wales.The Diagnosis of Urinary Tract infection in Young children study collected data on 7163 children aged <5 years, presenting to UK primary care with an acute illness (<28 days). Data were compared with the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption Network (ESAC-Net) disease-specific quality indicators to assess prescribing for URTIs, tonsillitis, and otitis media, against ESAC-Net proposed standards. Non-parametric trend tests (...) and χ2 tests assessed trends and differences in prescribing by level of deprivation, site type, and demographics.Prescribing rates fell within the recommendations for URTIs but exceeded the recommended limits for tonsillitis and otitis media. The proportion of children receiving the recommended antibiotic was below standards for URTIs and tonsillitis, but within the recommended limits for otitis media. Prescribing rates increased as the level of deprivation decreased for all infections (P<0.05

2018 British Journal of General Practice

135. Point prevalence survey of healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial use in European acute care hospitals ? protocol version 5.3

Point prevalence survey of healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial use in European acute care hospitals ? protocol version 5.3 www.ecdc.europa.eu Point prevalence survey of healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial use in European acute care hospitals Protocol version 5.3 TECHNICAL DOCUMENT ECDC TECHNICAL DOCUMENT Point prevalence survey of healthcare- associated infections and antimicrobial use in European acute care hospitals Protocol version 5.3, ECDC PPS 2016–2017 ii (...) Suggested citation: European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Point prevalence survey of healthcare- associated infections and antimicrobial use in European acute care hospitals – protocol version 5.3. Stockholm: ECDC; 2016. Stockholm, October 2016 ISBN 978-92-9193-993-0 doi 10.2900/374985 TQ-04-16-903-EN-N © European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, 2016 Reproduction is authorised, provided the source is acknowledged. TECHNICAL DOCUMENT PPS of HAIs and antimicrobial use in European

2016 European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control - Technical Guidance

136. Acute pain management: scientific evidence (3rd Edition)

Acute pain management: scientific evidence (3rd Edition) ? ? ? ? Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists and Faculty of Pain Medicine ? ? ? Endorsed by: Faculty?of?Pain?Medicine,?Royal?College?of? Anaesthetists,?United?Kingdom?? Royal?College?of?Anaesthetists,? United?Kingdom?? Australian?Pain?Society? Australasian?Faculty?of?Rehabilitation?Medicine? College?of?Anaesthesiologists,?? Academy?of?Medicine,?Malaysia? College (...) and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists, 630 St Kilda Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia. Website: www.anzca.edu.au Email: ceoanzca@anzca.edu.au This document should be cited as: Macintyre PE, Schug SA, Scott DA, Visser EJ, Walker SM; APM:SE Working Group of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists and Faculty of Pain Medicine (2010), Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence (3rd edition), ANZCA & FPM, Melbourne. Copyright information for Tables 11.1 and 11.2 The material

2015 National Health and Medical Research Council

137. Otitis Media (Acute)

and management of acute otitis media. Pediatrics e964–99, 2013. Table Guidelines for Using Antibiotics in Children With Acute Otitis Media* Age Otorrhea Severe symptoms † (unilateral or bilateral) Bilateral disease Unilateral disease, no severe symptoms 6 mo ‡ Antibiotics Antibiotics Antibiotics Antibiotics 6 mo to 2 yr Antibiotics Antibiotics Antibiotics Antibiotics or observe 48 to 72 h § ≥ 2 yr Antibiotics Antibiotics Antibiotics or observe 48 to 72 h § Antibiotics or observe 48 to 72 h (...) in which observation has not been thoroughly studied. Thus it is reasonable to continue to treat with antibiotics. § Decision making should be shared with parents. Observation is appropriate only if phone or office follow-up can be assured within 48 to 72 h; antibiotics are started if no improvement. Modified from Lieberthal AS, Carroll AE, Chonmaitree T, et al: The diagnosis and management of acute otitis media. Pediatrics e964–99, 2013. All patients receive analgesics (eg, acetaminophen , ibuprofen

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

138. Herbal medicine for acute otitis media: systematic review of randomized clinical trials

Herbal medicine for acute otitis media: systematic review of randomized clinical trials Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing (...) of the eligible articles for final inclusion. In each phase, 2 observers will independently assess each article. Discrepancies will be resolved through discussion, or by consulting a third investigator. ">Procedure for study selection Example : Title-abstract screening: 1. Not an original full research paper (e.g. review, editorial) 2. Not an in vivo animal study 3. No metastases/ only primary tumor 4. No control group 5. Combination therapy or contamination 6. Not about analgesics used in the clinic Full

2013 PROSPERO

139. In Vitro Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Formation and In Vivo Middle Ear Mucosal Biofilm in a Rat Model of Acute Otitis Induced by S. pneumoniae Full Text available with Trip Pro

In Vitro Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Formation and In Vivo Middle Ear Mucosal Biofilm in a Rat Model of Acute Otitis Induced by S. pneumoniae Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most common pathogens of otitis media (OM) that exists in biofilm, which enhances the resistance of bacteria against antibiotic killing and diagnosis, compared to the free-floating (planktonic) form. This study evaluated biofilm formation by S. pneumoniae on an abiotic surface and in the middle ear cavity (...) transtympanic membrane into the middle ear cavity of Sprague Dawley rats. The ultrastructure of middle ear mucus was observed by SEM 1 and 2 weeks post-inoculation.The in vitro study revealed robust biofilm formation by S. pneumoniae after 12-18 hours of incubation in high glucose medium, independent of exogenously supplied competence stimulating peptide and medium replacement. Adherent cells formed three-dimensional structures approximately 20-30 µm thick. The in vivo study revealed that ciliated

2012 Clinical and experimental otorhinolaryngology

140. External Otitis: An Unusual Presentation in Neonates Full Text available with Trip Pro

with irritability and discharge from the right ear. There were yellow otorrhea, mild erythema, and edema of right external ear canal. There was no sign of otitis media on otoscopy. The results of laboratory tests were insignificant. The discharge culture grew colonies of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. After 48 hours of treatment with intravenous cloxacillin, significant improvement was observed. The present case highlights an unusual presentation of staphylococcal infection in a neonate (...) External Otitis: An Unusual Presentation in Neonates Acute otitis externa (AOE) is an infection of the external auditory canal, the auricle, and the outer surface of the tympanic membrane. Although AOE is one of the most common otologic conditions encountered in pediatric population, it is known to primarily affect children older than 2 years. We report a case of AOE caused by Staphylococcus aureus in a 23-day-old neonate. A 23-day-old female infant presented to our neonatology clinic

2016 Case reports in infectious diseases

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