How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

676 results for

(thirst OR thirstiness OR dryness OR absorption) AND (exercising OR exercises OR "intense activity" OR "intense exertion" OR "sports participation" OR "sports activities") AND ("water intake" OR electrolytes OR quenching OR satisfying)

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Overview of acid-base and electrolyte disorders

of ammonium excretion. Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2005 Mar;20(3):642-6. https://academic.oup.com/ndt/article/20/3/642/1870537 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15735248?tool=bestpractice.com metabolic or respiratory alkalosis or renal tubular acidosis, hypothermia, vomiting, severe diarrhoea, Rose BD, Post TW. Clinical physiology of acid-base and electrolyte disorders. 5th ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2001:836-56. primary aldosteronism, salt-wasting nephropathies, exercising in a hot climate, Godek SF (...) Overview of acid-base and electrolyte disorders Overview of acid-base and electrolyte disorders - Summary of relevant conditions | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Overview of acid-base and electrolyte disorders Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: November 2018 Introduction Disorders of blood chemistry may be caused by dietary factors, underlying medical conditions, and medical treatments. Resulting imbalances include acidosis (pH

2018 BMJ Best Practice

2. Overview of acid-base and electrolyte disorders

of ammonium excretion. Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2005 Mar;20(3):642-6. https://academic.oup.com/ndt/article/20/3/642/1870537 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15735248?tool=bestpractice.com metabolic or respiratory alkalosis or renal tubular acidosis, hypothermia, vomiting, severe diarrhoea, Rose BD, Post TW. Clinical physiology of acid-base and electrolyte disorders. 5th ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2001:836-56. primary aldosteronism, salt-wasting nephropathies, exercising in a hot climate, Godek SF (...) Overview of acid-base and electrolyte disorders Overview of acid-base and electrolyte disorders - Summary of relevant conditions | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Overview of acid-base and electrolyte disorders Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: November 2018 Introduction Disorders of blood chemistry may be caused by dietary factors, underlying medical conditions, and medical treatments. Resulting imbalances include acidosis (pH

2018 BMJ Best Practice

3. Voluntary water intake during and following moderate exercise in the cold. (PubMed)

Voluntary water intake during and following moderate exercise in the cold. Exercising in cold environments results in water losses, yet examination of resultant voluntary water intake has focused on warm conditions. The purpose of the study was to assess voluntary water intake during and following exercise in a cold compared with a warm environment. Ten healthy males (22 ± 2 years, 67.8 ± 7.0 kg, 1.77 ± 0.06 m, VO₂peak 60.5 ± 8.9 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) completed two trials (7-8 days). In each trial (...) mOsm·kg⁻¹; p = .048). Thirst sensations were similar between trials (p > .05). Ad libitum water intake adjusted so that similar body mass losses occurred in both trials. In the cold there appeared to a blunted thirst response.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2014 International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism

4. CRACKCast E125 – Electrolyte Disorders

CRACKCast E125 – Electrolyte Disorders CRACKCast E125 – Electrolyte Disorders - CanadiEM CRACKCast E125 – Electrolyte Disorders In , , by Adam Thomas November 9, 2017 This episode of CRACKCast covers Rosen’s Chapter 117, Electrolyte Disorders. This episode will help you manage those electrolyte disturbances like the slick medical professional you are! Check out the shownotes for a deeper dive into the material. Shownotes – Core questions [1] What are the five most common causes of hyperkalemia (...) , with simultaneous oral and IV replacement. [7] What are the three main types of hypernatremia? Give 3 examples of each. By far, the most common cause is a patient with an altered thirst mechanism (elderly, disabled patient) without access to free water. Hypernatremia can be divided into three physiologic pairings: hypernatremia with dehydration and low total body sodium, hypernatremia with low total body water and normal total body sodium, hypernatremia with increased total body sodium [1] Double loss

2017 CandiEM

5. High-sweat Na+ in cystic fibrosis and healthy individuals does not diminish thirst during exercise in the heat (PubMed)

during exercise and changes in plasma levels of vasopressin, angiotensin II, and aldosterone relative to percent dehydration were not different among groups. However, ad libitum fluid replacement was 40% less, and serum NaCl concentration was lower for CF compared with SS and Control during recovery. Despite large variability in sweat electrolyte loss, thirst appears to be appropriately maintained during exercise in the heat as a linear function of dehydration, with relative contributions from (...) High-sweat Na+ in cystic fibrosis and healthy individuals does not diminish thirst during exercise in the heat Sweat Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]) varies greatly among individuals and is particularly high in cystic fibrosis (CF). The purpose of this study was to determine whether excess sweat [Na(+)] differentially impacts thirst drive and other physiological responses during progressive dehydration via exercise in the heat. Healthy subjects with high-sweat [Na(+)] (SS) (91.0 ± 17.3 mmol/l

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2011 American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology

6. The Role of Hydration on Exercise Performance

Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: During exercise in the heat, there is a need to replenish fluids in order to avoid dehydration and decrease the risk for heat illness. What drives this urge to drink is the thirst mechanism. Following ingestion of fluids, there is an inhibition of thirst before there is a replenishing of fluids. However, there is little scientific evidence of where thirst is inhibited, if this thirst inhibition is augmented by exercise and how thirst itself influence (...) exercise performance. Further, during rehydration studies, it is very difficult to successfully blind a subject to their drinking/hydration protocol. Previous studies that have blinded a subject to their drinking have used various methods such as intravenous fluid administration and/or nasogastric tubes. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to examine the mechanistic roles thirst inhibition plays while exercising in the heat while undergoing intravenous fluid administration. Specific attention

2016 Clinical Trials

7. Exercise Associated Hyponatremia

Hyponatremia Exercise Associated Hyponatremia Aka: Exercise Associated Hyponatremia II. Definition manifests within 24 hours of (esp. in endurance events) III. Epidemiology Common in Triathalons and arathons Symptomatic is found in 23% of those seeking medical attention after endurance events IV. Pathophysiology See Excessive free water intake (overhydration) around the time of an endurance event In healthy patients, maximal renal excretion: 500-1000 ml/hour Additional losses during with sweating (...) to emergency facility Other supportive measures as needed ( ) may be considered for , esp. if pulmonary edema X. Prevention Participants Educate on the risks of overhydration (e.g. drink to thirst) Electrolyte replacement solutions (however these do not eliminate risk) Race coordinators collect height, weight, BMI and underlying conditions that my predispose to Medical Tent and EMS Avoid hypotonic fluids for Onsite electrolyte testing (especially seryum ) is ideal Have available s (or bouillon cubes

2018 FP Notebook

8. Comparison of coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink on measures of hydration and physical performance in exercise-trained men. (PubMed)

Comparison of coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink on measures of hydration and physical performance in exercise-trained men. Sport drinks are ubiquitous within the recreational and competitive fitness and sporting world. Most are manufactured and artificially flavored carbohydrate-electrolyte beverages. Recently, attention has been given to coconut water, a natural alternative to manufactured sport drinks, with initial evidence indicating efficacy with regard to maintaining (...) hydration. We compared coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink on measures of hydration and physical performance in exercise-trained men.Following a 60-minute bout of dehydrating treadmill exercise, 12 exercise-trained men (26.6 ± 5.7 yrs) received bottled water (BW), pure coconut water (VitaCoco®: CW), coconut water from concentrate (CWC), or a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink (SD) [a fluid amount based on body mass loss during the dehydrating exercise] on four occasions (separated

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2012 Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition

9. Exercise Associated Hyponatremia

Hyponatremia Exercise Associated Hyponatremia Aka: Exercise Associated Hyponatremia II. Definition manifests within 24 hours of (esp. in endurance events) III. Epidemiology Common in Triathalons and arathons Symptomatic is found in 23% of those seeking medical attention after endurance events IV. Pathophysiology See Excessive free water intake (overhydration) around the time of an endurance event In healthy patients, maximal renal excretion: 500-1000 ml/hour Additional losses during with sweating (...) to emergency facility Other supportive measures as needed ( ) may be considered for , esp. if pulmonary edema X. Prevention Participants Educate on the risks of overhydration (e.g. drink to thirst) Electrolyte replacement solutions (however these do not eliminate risk) Race coordinators collect height, weight, BMI and underlying conditions that my predispose to Medical Tent and EMS Avoid hypotonic fluids for Onsite electrolyte testing (especially seryum ) is ideal Have available s (or bouillon cubes

2017 FP Notebook

10. Carbohydrate Electrolyte Solutions Enhance Endurance Capacity in Active Females (PubMed)

during exercise, the plasma glucose concentration in the CES trial was higher than that in PL trial. No differences were observed in the plasma lactate level, respiratory exchange ratio, heart rate, perceived rate of exertion, sensation of thirst, or abdominal discomfort between the two trials (p > 0.05). The results of the present study confirm that CES supplementation improves the moderate intensity endurance capacity of active females during the follicular phases of the menstrual cycle. However (...) Carbohydrate Electrolyte Solutions Enhance Endurance Capacity in Active Females The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of supplementation with a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES) in active females during a prolonged session of submaximal running to exhaustion. Eight healthy active females volunteered to perform a session of open-ended running to exhaustion at 70% of their maximal oxygen consumption on a treadmill during the follicular phase of their menstrual

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2015 Nutrients

11. Comparing the rehydration potential of different milk-based drinks to a carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage. (PubMed)

Comparing the rehydration potential of different milk-based drinks to a carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage. The aim of this study was to compare the rehydration potential of a carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage with several varieties of milk following exercise-induced fluid losses. Fifteen male participants (age 24.9 ± 5.5 years, height 179.3 ± 4.9 cm, body mass 75.8 ± 6.6 kg (mean ± SD)) lost 2.0% ± 0.2% body mass through intermittent cycling before consuming a different beverage on 4 separate (...) unaffected by drink treatment. Subjective ratings of bloating and fullness were higher during all milk trials compared with Powerade whereas ratings of overall thirst were not different between beverages. Milk-based drinks are more effective rehydration options compared with traditional sports drinks. The additional energy, protein, and sodium in a milk-based liquid meal supplement facilitate superior fluid recovery following exercise.

2014 Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquee, nutrition et metabolisme

12. L-Arginine but not L-glutamine likely increases exogenous carbohydrate oxidation during endurance exercise. (PubMed)

L-Arginine but not L-glutamine likely increases exogenous carbohydrate oxidation during endurance exercise. The addition of L-arginine or L-glutamine to glucose-electrolyte solutions can increase intestinal water, glucose, and sodium absorption in rats and humans. We evaluated the utility of L-arginine and L-glutamine in energy-rehydration beverages through assessment of exogenous glucose oxidation and perceptions of exertion and gastrointestinal distress during endurance exercise. Eight (...) in perceptions of stomach fullness, abdominal cramp, exertion, and muscle tiredness during exercise. Addition of L-arginine to a glucose and electrolyte solution increases the oxidation of exogenous glucose and decreases the oxygen cost of exercise, although the mechanisms responsible and impact on endurance performance require further investigation. However, L-arginine also increases subjective feelings of gastrointestinal distress, which may attenuate its other benefits.

2012 European journal of applied physiology

13. Overview of Exercise

great that it causes injury or nonadherence. More exercise or higher-intensity activity is not always better; too little or too much activity may prevent achievement of desired outcomes. A prescription for exercise should specify intensity (level of exertion), volume (amount of activity in a session), frequency (number of exercise sessions), and progressive overload (either the amount of increase in one or more of these elements per workout or the actual load). The balance of these elements depends (...) ), 2002. : Heart rate and exercise intensity during sports activities. Practical application. Sports Med 5(5):303-311, 1988. Strength training Strength (resistance) training involves forceful muscular contraction against a load—typically provided by free or machine weights, cable weights, or sometimes body weight (eg, push-ups, abdominal crunches, chin-ups). Such training increases muscle strength, muscle endurance, and muscle size. Strength training also improves functional ability and, depending

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

14. Effects of a Community Based Exercise Program in Adults With Severe Burns

or bilirubin >3.0 mg/dl), Known coronary artery disease, Congestive heart failure, Uncontrolled asthma or pulmonary disease (e.g. emphysema, COPD), Associated head injuries requiring specific treatment, Mental retardation or autism or any other mental disorder, which makes it impossible to participate in an exercise program; Gastrointestinal disorders which impair absorption. Pregnancy if applicable Contacts and Locations Go to Information from the National Library of Medicine To learn more about (...) Effects of a Community Based Exercise Program in Adults With Severe Burns Effects of a Community Based Exercise Program in Adults With Severe Burns - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Effects

2010 Clinical Trials

15. Urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse in women: management

of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising their judgement, professionals and practitioners are expected to take this guideline fully into account, alongside the individual needs, preferences and values of their patients or the people using their service. It is not mandatory to apply the recommendations, and the guideline does not override the responsibility to make decisions appropriate to the circumstances of the individual, in consultation with them (...) as a Urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse in women: management (NG123) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 13 of 72routine part of pelvic floor muscle training. [2006] [2006] 1.4.7 Continue an exercise programme if pelvic floor muscle training is beneficial. [2006] [2006] T o find out why the committee made the 2019 recommendation on pelvic floor muscle training and how it might affect practice, see

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

16. Acute kidney injury

, hypertension or hypotension, oedema, lethargy, uraemia, or decreased urine output; however, often asymptomatic and only diagnosed by laboratory tests. An acute increase in serum creatinine is essential for diagnosis. Fluid overload, hyperkalaemia, hyperphosphataemia, metabolic acidosis, and elevated urea nitrogen are common. The mainstay of treatment is supportive care, with management of the underlying illness; correction of acid/base, electrolyte, and volume complications; removal or minimisation (...) to nephrotoxins, outflow obstruction, or intrinsic renal disease. The resulting effects include impaired clearance and regulation of metabolic homeostasis, altered acid/base and electrolyte regulation, and impaired volume regulation. History and exam presence of risk factors reduced urine production vomiting dizziness orthopnoea paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea pulmonary oedema hypotension tachycardia orthostatic hypotension hypertension peripheral oedema muscle tenderness limb ischaemia seizures prostatic

2019 BMJ Best Practice

17. Cystic fibrosis: diagnosis and management

exercising their judgement, professionals and practitioners are expected to take this guideline fully into account, alongside the individual needs, preferences and values of their patients or the people using their service. It is not mandatory to apply the recommendations, and the guideline does not override the responsibility to make decisions appropriate to the circumstances of the individual, in consultation with them and their families and carers or guardian. Local commissioners and providers (...) intravenous antibiotic services, including intravenous access. 1.3.13 Specialist physiotherapists should assess and advise people with cystic fibrosis at clinic, at inpatient admissions, during pulmonary exacerbations and at their annual review. Assessment and advice could cover airway clearance, nebuliser use, musculoskeletal disorders, exercise, physical activity and urinary incontinence. 1.3.14 Specialist dietitians should assess and advise people with cystic fibrosis about all aspects of nutrition

2017 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

18. Eating disorders: recognition and treatment

, including laxative or diet pill misuse, vomiting or excessive exercise abdominal pain that is associated with vomiting or restrictions in diet, and that cannot be fully explained by a medical condition unexplained electrolyte imbalance or hypoglycaemia atypical dental wear (such as erosion) whether they take part in activities associated with a high risk of eating disorders (for example, professional sport, fashion, dance, or modelling). 1.2.7 Be aware that, in addition to the points in recommendation (...) Assess whether ECG monitoring is needed in people with an eating disorder, based on the following risk factors: rapid weight loss excessive exercise severe purging behaviours, such as laxative or diuretic use or vomiting bradycardia hypotension excessive caffeine (including from energy drinks) prescribed or non-prescribed medications muscular weakness electrolyte imbalance previous abnormal heart rhythm. Management for all eating disorders Management for all eating disorders 1.10.3 Provide acute

2017 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

19. Emergency Drought Relief Package: Health and Resilience Services

. In part, how drought is defined can depend on a number of circumstances. Drought was defined by Hennessy, et al. (2008) (2) in four different ways: 1. Meteorological drought (a period of time with less rainfall) 2. Agricultural drought (dryness of surface soil layers because of evapotranspiration) 3. Hydrological drought (prolonged moisture deficits and water stream flow/storage decreases) 4. Socioeconomic drought (the effect of elements of the droughts on supply and demand of economic, social (...) . Some of the identified reasons included the impact of higher temperatures on sleep, medicine effectiveness and reduced exercise, although there were a number of other possible pathways — for example, the cumulative impact of stress from drought, where stress anxiety builds up over time, resulting in more negative health impacts such as headaches, gastrointestinal complaints, increased risk-taking behaviour, increased alcohol and drug use (13) , changed sleep patterns, fatigue, helplessness, sadness

2019 Sax Institute Evidence Check

20. Amfetamine overdose

high ambient temperature volume depletion exercise and sweating excessive alcohol intake polydrug usage anxiety and depression hx of behavioural disturbance hx of delinquency or crime ADHD attendance at dance club or rave party hx of drug misuse for more than 1 year genetic predilection Diagnostic investigations serum glucose serum electrolytes serum creatinine, urea ABG serum AST, ALT, gamma-GT serum PT, PTT, INR urinalysis urine toxicology screen serum alcohol level serum creatine kinase serum (...) drug interaction hypertension hyperreflexia and clonus chest pain cardiac arrhythmia hx of hepatitis B or C, HIV tremor, repetitive movements disorientation, confusion, delirium malnutrition superficial venous abnormalities rapid speech, pacing, trismus hallucinations or delusions tremor, hypertonicity, or muscle rigidity paranoia, hypervigilance, or psychosis mydriasis hx of heart disease tachypnoea dyspnoea lack of thirst abdominal pain positive Babinski focal neurological signs, papilloedema

2018 BMJ Best Practice

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>