How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

481 results for

("physical activity" OR "physical exercise" OR "physical fitness") AND (leisure OR "active travel" OR "sports participation" OR housework OR mental) AND (statistics OR data) 〈=en

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

161. WHO recommendations on antenatal care for a positive pregnancy experience

of WHO recommendations on antenatal care (ANC) for a positive pregnancy experience These recommendations apply to pregnant women and adolescent girls within the context of routine ANC A. Nutritional interventions Recommendation Type of recommendation Dietary interventions A.1.1: Counselling about healthy eating and keeping physically active during pregnancy is recommended for pregnant women to stay healthy and to prevent excessive weight gain during pregnancy. a Recommended A.1.2: In undernourished (...) WHO recommendations on antenatal care for a positive pregnancy experience WHO recommendations on antenatal care for a positive pregnancy experienceWHO Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data WHO recommendations on antenatal care for a positive pregnancy experience. I.World Health Organization. ISBN 978 92 4 154991 2 Subject headings are available from WHO institutional repository © World Health Organization 2016 All rights reserved. Publications of the World Health Organization are available

2016 World Health Organisation Guidelines

162. Daily iron supplementation in postpartum women

Daily iron supplementation in postpartum women 2016 IRON SUPPLEMENTATION in postpartum women GUIDELINEGuideline: IRON SUPPLEMENTATION IN POSTPARTUM wOMENWHO Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data Guideline: Iron supplementation in postpartum women 1.Iron - administration and dosage. 2.Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - prevention and control. 3.Postpartum period. 4.Women. 5.Dietary Supplements. 6.Guideline. I.World Health Organization. ISBN 978 92 4 154958 5 (NLM classification: WH 160) © World Health (...) little iron is excreted through breast milk (9, 10). Nevertheless, one of the strongest predictors of postpartum anaemia is anaemia during pregnancy, as iron stores tend to remain low for several months after childbirth, especially if there is significant blood loss during the delivery and additional iron is not consumed in sufficient quantities (11–13). Worldwide, there are limited data on the prevalence of postpartum anaemia. Studies conducted in high-income countries have reported that 10–30

2016 World Health Organisation Guidelines

163. Evidence on financing and budgeting mechanisms to support intersectoral actions between health, education, social welfare and labour sectors

was conditional on the involvement of two or more sectors. It provided “tangible motivation for the different sectors to collaborate and find intersectoral solutions” (23). For example, funds were awarded 7 to the health, children and youth, and planning sectors to create a collaborative SPACE (schoolyard, playspot, active transport, fitness club activities and environment) project to develop attractive and inviting physical surroundings to encourage more physical activity in young people (24). Swedish county (...) . This can be seen, for example, in an evaluation of the Streets Ahead school-based programme, which was funded by VicHealth to create supportive environments for children’s physical activity when travelling to and from school (Case study 5) (34). More flexibility to compensate schools financially for teacher time spent on the programme, as well as more efforts to demonstrate direct benefits to schools, would have been desirable. Case study 5. Funding and scope for intersectoral action in the Streets

2016 WHO Health Evidence Network

164. Cultural contexts of health: the use of narrative research in the health sector

(to inform and refine the design of survey items) and in their own right (to add meaning, context and granularity to survey data). The third case study addresses mental health in refugees and asylum seekers. A narrative approach can illuminate the dramatic and often tragic life experiences of the displaced in a way that may be missed (and even obscured) by the use of conventional medical and psychiatric categories – both at an individual level and in relation to the diasporas of cultural groups. Policy (...) two main elements: a summary and synthesis of narrative research methods and three case studies to illustrate the range of narrative approaches and how these can complement other data. The case studies examine cultural aspects of nutrition, the cultural context of well-being, and mental health in refugees and asylum seekers.CULTURAL CONTEXTS OF HEALTH: THE USE OF NARRATIVE RESEARCH IN THE HEALTH SECTOR HEALTH EVIDENCE NETWORK SYNTHESIS REPORT 1.2. Methodology This report used a novel

2016 WHO Health Evidence Network

165. Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Women

should form 50% of total grain intake. • Naturally occurring sugars are preferred. Avoid sweets and sucrose -sweetened beverages. • Reduce daily salt intake to approximately 1-1¼ teaspoon salt. • Replace saturated and trans-fats with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Nutrition Physical Activity • Exercise for at least 30 - 45 minutes, 5 times a week. Women who need to lose weight or sustain weight loss should exercise more. Weight maintenance /reduction • Ideal BMI for Asian women is 18.5 (...) especially in females. For any given BMI, women have more total body fat. Waist circumference correlates better with abdominal fat content than BMI. Gender specific waist circumference cut-off points for CVD risk have been established. In Asians, a waist circumference of = 80 cm in women raises CVD risk. 317 Weight gain during adulthood is associated with a significantly increased risk of CHD, independent of physical activity level. 344 In a large prospective study in women, those who gained substantial

2016 Ministry of Health, Malaysia

166. Sleep Duration and Quality: Impact on Lifestyle Behaviors and Cardiometabolic Health: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

-reported physical activity variables but that this relationship was generally nonlinear. Moderate exercise was generally not associated with insufficient sleep for values up to ≈1 h/d, and vigorous physical activity was nonlinearly but generally associated with greater insufficient sleep, which was consistent with employment data showing that manual labor was associated with more insufficient sleep than jobs that included mostly sitting or standing. In contrast, however, those engaging in no activity (...) are clearly complex and may not be well measured at the population level. For example, there may be subgroups of short sleepers who, by virtue of having more wake time, are more physically active, whereas others who sleep poorly have less energy and ability to be active. It seems to be the case, however, that decreased physical activity plays a role in the relation between sleep and CVD. In an analysis of data from the National Institutes of Health–AARP Diet and Health Study, SSD predicted CVD mortality

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 American Heart Association

167. Current Diagnostic and Treatment Strategies for Specific Dilated Cardiomyopathies: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

hypertension usually precedes the development of HF with anti–vascular en- dothelial growth factor medications; it is also generally acknowledged that if blood pressure is well controlled with antihypertensive drugs, the risk of HF is low with anti–vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Several other newer classes of medications for the treatment of cancer are in development; at this time, there are not enough data to clearly implicate them as causing cardiomyopathy, but with expanded clinical use (...) of anthracycline-based treatment at the present time, including doxorubicin, daunorubi- cin, mitoxantrone, epirubicin, and liposomal versions. 109 There have been a host of studies that attempted to gain an understanding of whether dosing frequency, length of each infusion, total dose, and concomitant therapy (such as trastuzumab) are major determinants of the severity of cardiomyopathy. 110 What is clear from the totality of data is that the risk of toxicity is related in part to the total dose; however

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 American Heart Association

168. Preventing and Experiencing Ischemic Heart Disease as a Woman: State of the Science

, and hair texture) that imposes social concerns. Interestingly, racial/ethnic variations in IHD exist in the United States, and black women have higher prevalence rates (7.0%) of IHD compared with Hispanic (5.9%) and white (4.6%) women. The same trend is noted with myocardial infarction (2.2%, 1.7%, and 1.8%, respectively) and angina (5.0%, 3.8%, and 2.9%). The AHA statistical data for Asian and American Indian/Alaska Native women either are not listed or did not meet the standards of reliability (...) on Aging, Exercise and Physical Activity . Silver Sneakers and other local programs are increasing opportunities for both older men and women to participate in physical activity. However, despite these educational materials tailored to older adults and increasing opportunities for age-related group exercise activities, women continue to have higher rates of PI than men (33.2% compared to 29.9%), perhaps because health professionals are not encouraging them to increase activity. , Unfortunately, high

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 American Heart Association

169. Use of Antipsychotics to Treat Agitation or Psychosis in Patients With Dementia

- vention Effectiveness for Alzheimer’s Disease CGI Clinical Global Impressions CGI-C Clinical Global Impression of Change CI Confidence interval CMAI Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory CV A Cerebrovascular accident DLB Dementia with Lewy body DSM-IV Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition DSM-5 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition EPS Extrapyramidal symptoms FAST Functional assessment staging FGA First-generation antipsychotic GRADE Grading (...) of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation HR Hazard ratio ICD-10 International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision IR Immediate release IRR Incidence rate ratio ITT Intention to treat MDS Minimum data set MI Myocardial infarction MMSE Mini-Mental State Examination NC Not calculated NIA National Institute on Aging NIMH National Institute of Mental Health NINCDS/ADRDA National Institute of Neurologi- cal and Communicative Diseases and Stroke/Alzhei- mer’s Disease and Related Disorders

2016 American Psychiatric Association

170. Importance of Assessing Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Clinical Practice: A Case for Fitness as a Clinical Vital Sign: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

in physical activity. Blair et al studied 9777 men given 2 preventive medical examinations, each of which included assessment of CRF by maximal exercise testing, a mean of 5.1 years apart. The highest age-adjusted all-cause death rate was observed in men who were unfit at both examinations (122.0/10 000 man-years); the lowest death rate was observed in those who were physically fit at both examinations (39.6/10 000 man-years). Men who improved from unfit to fit between the first and second examination had (...) , PT, FAHA , MD, MPH, PhD , PhD, FAHA , PhD, FAHA , PhD , PhD, FAHA , MD, FAHA , MD , PhD, FAHA , MD, PhD, MBA , MD , PhD , and MD, MPH, PhD PhDOn behalf of the American Heart Association Physical Activity Committee of the Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health; Council on Clinical Cardiology; Council on Epidemiology and Prevention; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology; and Stroke Council Robert Ross , Steven N. Blair , Ross

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 American Heart Association

171. Establishing breastfeeding

Refer to Table 6. Skin to skin contact and Table 7. Baby feeding patterns • Offer anticipatory guidance for managing minor concerns 2 • Offer information about breastfeeding support in the community o Peer counselling promotes the initiation and maintenance of breastfeeding 37 • Offer information about optimal maternal nutrition and physical activity 40 • Recommend an iodine supplement 150 micrograms oral daily 41 o Women with pre-existing thyroid conditions should seek advice from their general (...) Breastfeeding away from home o Maximising breastmilk if infant formula has been introduced o Continuing to breastfeed upon return to work o Contraception o Normal changes over time o Appropriate nutrition for babies o Smoking and alcohol consumption • Encourage review of baby by a health care professional at five to seven days of age o Refer to Queensland Clinical Guideline: Routine newborn assessment 73 Nutrition and physical activity • Provide advice about nutrition as per the Australian dietary

2016 Queensland Health

172. Guidelines for adult stroke rehabilitation and recovery

). Apathy is mani- fested in >50% of survivors at 1 year after stroke 5 ; fatigue is a common and debilitating symptom in chronic stroke 6 ; daily physical activity of community-living stroke survivors is low 7 ; and depressive symptomology is high. 8 By 4 years after onset, >30% of stroke survivors report persistent participation restrictions (eg, difficulty with autonomy, engagement, or ful- filling societal roles). 9 The Rehabilitation Program Organization of Poststroke Rehabilitation Care (Levels (...) review therapy, motivational interviewing, nursing support programs, and physical exercise. Rehabilitation, Exercise, and Recovery A study with 49 depressed patients (24 treated for depres- sion and 25 not treated as determined by physician prefer- ence) was conducted to evaluate the effects of poststroke depression and antidepressant therapy on the improvement of motor scores and disability. 229 Poststroke depression was found to have negative effects on functional recovery, and the pharmacological

2016 American Academy of Neurology

173. Youth Sport Programs that Address Substance Use ? An Environmental Scan

found that participation in sports in school and sports where a coach was present was associated with less substance use, while out-of-school sport participation was associated with increased marijuana use (Sztainert, 2015). These inconsistent findings might be due in part to the complexity of measuring sport’s effect on substance use. The National Institute on Drug Abuse has stated that there are significant knowledge gaps when attempting to understand the relationship between physical activity (...) for the participant to change his or her behaviour. ? Programs that provided access to sport made sport available to youth to divert them from drug-related behaviours (e.g., the First Choice Physical Fitness Program). There is a lack of evaluation of these program types in terms of reducing substance use, but they might increase physical activity for participants. ? Multilevel programs used many of the above components in their program delivery, (e.g., the Athletic Prevention, Programming and Leadership Education

2016 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

174. Establishing breastfeeding

Refer to Table 6. Skin to skin contact and Table 7. Baby feeding patterns • Offer anticipatory guidance for managing minor concerns 2 • Offer information about breastfeeding support in the community o Peer counselling promotes the initiation and maintenance of breastfeeding 37 • Offer information about optimal maternal nutrition and physical activity 40 • Recommend an iodine supplement 150 micrograms oral daily 41 o Women with pre-existing thyroid conditions should seek advice from their general (...) Breastfeeding away from home o Maximising breastmilk if infant formula has been introduced o Continuing to breastfeed upon return to work o Contraception o Normal changes over time o Appropriate nutrition for babies o Smoking and alcohol consumption • Encourage review of baby by a health care professional at five to seven days of age o Refer to Queensland Clinical Guideline: Routine newborn assessment 73 Nutrition and physical activity • Provide advice about nutrition as per the Australian dietary

2016 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

175. Impact of Hypertension on Cognitive Function: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

of experts examines the impact of hypertension on cognition to assess the state of the knowledge, to identify gaps, and to provide future directions. Methods— Authors with relevant expertise were selected to contribute to this statement in accordance with the American Heart Association conflict-of-interest management policy. Panel members were assigned topics relevant to their areas of expertise, reviewed the literature, and summarized the available data. Results— Hypertension disrupts the structure (...) cognition is not conclusive. Conclusions— After carefully reviewing the literature, the group concluded that there were insufficient data to make evidence-based recommendations. However, judicious treatment of hypertension, taking into account goals of care and individual characteristics (eg, age and comorbidities), seems justified to safeguard vascular health and, as a consequence, brain health. Introduction Dementia is a progressive and typically irreversible deterioration of cognitive function

2016 American Heart Association

176. AHA/ASA Guidelines for Adult Stroke Rehabilitation and Recovery

reintegration, health-related quality of life, maintenance of activity, and self-efficacy (ie, belief in one’s capability to carry out a behavior). Apathy is manifested in >50% of survivors at 1 year after stroke ; fatigue is a common and debilitating symptom in chronic stroke ; daily physical activity of community-living stroke survivors is low ; and depressive symptomology is high. By 4 years after onset, >30% of stroke survivors report persistent participation restrictions (eg, difficulty with autonomy (...) resting position of the scapula in lateral rotation. , Compared with those without voluntary movement, patients with some movement in the painful hemiparetic shoulder have a higher rate of shoulder joint tissue injury on magnetic resonance imaging, suggesting that more physical activity promotes injury. However, the relationship between altered kinematics and pain in the hemiparetic shoulder has not been established. For example, shoulder joint kinematics are altered with spasticity, yet

2016 American Heart Association

177. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology Clinical Practice Guidelines for Comprehensive Medical Care of Patients with Obesity

of lifestyle therapy are associated with efficacy? 91 Q6.1. Meal plan and macronutrient composition 92 Q6.2. Physical activity 93 Q6.3. Behavior interventions 96 Q7. Is pharmacotherapy effective to treat overweight and obesity? 102 Q7.1. Should pharmacotherapy be used as an adjunct to lifestyle therapy? 102 Q7.2. Does the addition of pharmacotherapy produce greater weight loss and weight-loss maintenance than lifestyle therapy alone? 102 Q7.3. Should pharmacotherapy only be used in the short term to help (...) and meta-analyses of these trials [EL 1]), in the interest of conciseness, derivative EL 4 review publica- tions that include many primary evidence citations (EL 1, EL 2, and EL 3) are also included. In addition, rigorously reviewed guidelines by other organizations have been adopted for specific issues, such as physical activity guide- lines by the American Academy of Sports Medicine (28 [EL 4; NE]), physical activity guidelines by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology

2016 American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists

178. Clinical Practice Guidelines on Obesity

by the patient, and the diagnostic and treatment options available. Statement of IntentContents Key Guideline Recommendations 1 1 Introduction 19 2 Epidemiology, public health aspects and definition 21 3 Clinical significance of obesity 26 4 Diagnosis and Classification 30 5 Assessment 36 6 Treatment: Introduction 41 7 Treatment: Diet 43 8 Treatment: Physical activity 53 9 Treatment: Behavioural modifications and related therapy 58 10 Treatment: Information and communication technology (ICT) and tools (...) , obesity is preventable, thus making it a public health priority to address. As part of the obesity control efforts, Singapore continually empowers health professionals to better manage obesity in the community. With the updating of the Obesity Clinical Practice Guidelines, the revised guidelines aim to equip health professionals with the evidence-base for a holistic multi-disciplinary approach to manage obesity ranging from diet, physical activity, medication, surgery and more. With an all-rounded

2016 Ministry of Health, Singapore

179. Psoriasis: assessment and management

) Alcohol-use disorders: prevention (NICE public health guidance 24) Stop smoking services (NICE public health guidance 10) Physical activity: brief advice for adults in primary care (NICE public health guidance 44) Physical activity in the workplace (NICE public health guidance 13) Physical activity for children and young people (NICE public health guidance 17). T T opical ther opical therap apy: gener y: general recommendations al recommendations Offer practical support and advice about the use (...) activity: brief advice for adults in primary care (NICE public health guidance 44) Physical activity in the workplace (NICE public health guidance 13) Physical activity for children and young people (NICE public health guidance 17). 1.2.3.3 For people with multiple comorbidities and/or multimorbidities and any type of psoriasis needing second- or third-line therapy, ensure multidisciplinary working and communication between specialties and, if needed, interdisciplinary team working (for example when

2012 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

180. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for the management of anxiety, posttraumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders

/ Association Canadienne des troubles anxieux and McGill University Abstract Background: Anxiety and related disorders are among the most common mental disorders, with lifetime prevalence reportedly as high as 31%. Unfortunately, anxiety disorders are under-diagnosed and under-treated. Methods: These guidelines were developed by Canadian experts in anxiety and related disorders through a consensus process. Data on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment (psychological and pharmacological) were obtained (...) intervention was then made, based on global impression of efficacy in clinical trials, effectiveness in clinical practice, and side effects, using a modified version of the periodic health examination guide- lines (Table 2). The guidelines were initiated prior to the introduction of the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) fifth edi- tion of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and the committee was sensitive to potential changes to the nosology of anxiety and related

2014 CPG Infobase

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>