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181. Guideline on the management of premature ovarian insufficiency

for the cardiovascular system? Women with POI are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease and should be advised of risk factors that they can modify through behavioural change (e.g. stopping smoking, taking regular weight-bearing exercise, healthy weight). B All women diagnosed with Turner Syndrome should be evaluated by a cardiologist with expertise in congenital heart disease. C Is estrogen replacement cardio-protective? Despite lack of longitudinal outcome data, hormone replacement therapy with early (...) to compliance. GPP No routine monitoring tests are required but may be prompted by specific symptoms or concerns. GPP Treatment with androgens Women should be informed that androgen treatment is only supported by limited data, and that long-term health effects are not clear yet. C If androgen therapy is commenced, treatment effect should be evaluated after 3-6 months and should possibly be limited to 24 months. GPP 18 HRT in women with POI and special issues Turner Syndrome Girls and women with POI due

2015 European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology

182. Cortical Auditory Evoked Potential (CAEP) Testing

- organic component than previously recorded. After giving the test instructions, remove any hearing aids, headwear or ear-rings that may obstruct the correct placement of the transducers, cause discomfort or affect sound transmission. Wherever possible, hair, scarves etc., should not be allowed to sit between the ear and the transducer. Unlike conventional PTA in which any spectacles should be removed, CAEP testing requires that the patient be alert yet not physically active and in adult testing (...) Potential Testing BSA 2016 @BSA 2016 Page4 Contents 1. Introduction 6 1.1. Historical Setting 6 1.2. Characteristics and uses of the CAEP 6 2. Scope 9 3. Equipment & Test Environment 9 3.1. Equipment 9 3.2. Test Environment 10 4. Staff Training 10 5. Preparation for testing 11 5.1. Preparation of test patients 11 5.2. Patient Instructions 12 5.3. Electrodes 13 6. Stimuli 14 6.1. Calibration 14 6.2. Stimulus type 14 7. Masking 15 8. Data Collection 16 8.1. Stimulus repetition rate 16 8.2. Number

2016 British Society of Audiology

183. The Role of Bariatric Surgery in Improving Reproductive Health

by understanding how different surgical approaches impinge on or alter reproductive outcomes.Scientific Impact Paper No. 17 © Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists 8 of 10 References 1. Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC). Statistics on Obesity, Physical Activity and Diet: England 2015. Leeds: HSCIC; 2015 [http://www.hscic.gov.uk/ catalogue/PUB16988/obes-phys-acti-diet-eng-2015.pdf]. Accessed 2015 Jul 27. 2. Buchwald H, Avidor Y, Braunwald E, Jensen MD, Pories W, Fahrbach K, et al (...) data from women with gastric bypass (n = 286) alone, the risk of SGA was even higher (aOR 2.78). With respect to other outcomes, in contrast to smaller studies, no statistically significant differences were found between the groups regarding the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus, pre-eclampsia, labour induction, caesarean section, postpartum haemorrhage, Apgar score less than 7, admission to neonatal intensive care unit or perinatal death. The discrepancy between gestational diabetes and pre

2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

184. Ventricular Arrhythmias and the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death

to derive a recommendation from the evidence obtained from existing screening programmes illustrates the need for further work to collect quantitative data on the cost–benefit profile of performing ECG screening in different populations and in different healthcare systems and settings. Conversely, in consideration of the higher risk of arrhythmias and the worsening of structural or genetic diseases in individuals exposed to intense physical exercise, 81,82 we do support the existing recommendations (...) in life. The availability of novel technologies that allow faster and cheaper genotyping may soon provide data on very large populations and deliver the statistical power required for these investigations. 3.3.2 Patients with ischaemic heart disease For more than two decades investigators throughout the world have envisioned a broad range of ‘indicators’ for SCD occurring in the setting of ischaemic heart disease. Several non-invasive markers of risk of SCD have been proposed for patients

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2015 European Society of Cardiology

185. Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

. A variety of approaches have been used to advance knowledge about the very long-term morbidity associated with childhood cancer and its contribution to early mortality. These initiatives have utilized a spectrum of resources including investigation of data from the following: Population-based registries.[ - ] Self-reported outcomes (provided through large-scale cohort studies).[ , ] Medical assessments.[ , ] Studies reporting outcomes in survivors who have been well characterized regarding clinical (...) status and treatment exposures, and comprehensively ascertained for specific effects through medical assessments, typically provide the highest quality data to establish the occurrence and risk profiles for late cancer treatment–related toxicity. Regardless of study methodology, it is important to consider selection and participation bias of the cohort studies in the context of the findings reported. Prevalence of Late Effects in Childhood Cancer Survivors Late effects are commonly experienced

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

186. Bariatric Surgery in Improving Reproductive Health, The Role of

by understanding how different surgical approaches impinge on or alter reproductive outcomes.Scientific Impact Paper No. 17 © Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists 8 of 10 References 1. Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC). Statistics on Obesity, Physical Activity and Diet: England 2015. Leeds: HSCIC; 2015 [http://www.hscic.gov.uk/ catalogue/PUB16988/obes-phys-acti-diet-eng-2015.pdf]. Accessed 2015 Jul 27. 2. Buchwald H, Avidor Y, Braunwald E, Jensen MD, Pories W, Fahrbach K, et al (...) data from women with gastric bypass (n = 286) alone, the risk of SGA was even higher (aOR 2.78). With respect to other outcomes, in contrast to smaller studies, no statistically significant differences were found between the groups regarding the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus, pre-eclampsia, labour induction, caesarean section, postpartum haemorrhage, Apgar score less than 7, admission to neonatal intensive care unit or perinatal death. The discrepancy between gestational diabetes and pre

2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

187. Evidence to inform the commissioning of social prescribing

review examining the effect of exercise referral schemes in primary care on physical activity and improving health outcomes. 5 The review included eight trials (5190 participants), six conducted in the UK. Participants were mainly sedentary, aged 54 to 71, with evidence of cardiovascular risk factor(s). The main referrer was the GP; follow-up ranged from two to 12 months. There were no significant differences in physical activity, physical fitness, or clinical outcomes between exercise referral (...) . 13 The review found no clear agreement about the definition of social prescribing but some evidence that some specific social prescription interventions can have a positive impact on people’s lives. These included exercise programmes such as: gym-based activity; guided/health walks; green activity; cycling; swimming and aqua-therapy; team sports; and exercise and dance classes. Robust evidence was found to support the mental health benefits of physical activity for clinical and non-clinical

2015 Evidence briefings

188. Hand Pain and Sensory Deficits: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

physical therapy | volume 49 | number 5 | may 2019 | cpg9 Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Clinical Practice Guidelines III Gelberman et al 103 compared carpal tunnel pressure between those with and without CTS. They report- ed a statistically significant higher carpal tunnel pressure in the patient group when compared to the controls with the wrist in a neutral position (P .05) using data from the middle finger. Static 2PD I II Results from 1 level I and 1 level II study showed that 2PD (using less than 4 (...) fingers from SWMT increased sen - sitivity from 16% to 82%, with specificity equal to 86%. Fertl et al 97 examined 47 patients (63 hands) with CTS confirmed by NCS and 20 healthy controls (39 hands) and found that combining a timed Phalen test (timed to appearance of symptoms) and the manual carpal compression test im- proved all diagnostic statistics resulting in a PPV of 95% and an NPV of 88%. In a retrospective, unblinded chart review, LaJoie et al 157 reviewed data from 81 patients (162 wrists

2019 The Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), Inc.

189. Acute pain management: scientific evidence (3rd Edition)

patient groups/ circumstances. Reversed The new evidence is inconsistent with the data used to inform the original key message(s). The strength of the new evidence alters the conclusions of the original document. NB Clinical and scientific judgment informed the choices made by the Working Party members; there was no mandatory threshold of new evidence (eg number of studies, types of studies, magnitude of statistical findings) that had to be met before classification to categories occurred. The first (...) to reversal of a conclusion and key message, this was noted in the text. Review and revision of key messages New New evidence leads to new key message(s). Unchanged The new evidence is consistent with the data used to formulate the original key message. The key message in the original report remains unchanged. Strengthened The new evidence is consistent with the data used to formulate the original key message. The key message in the original report remains unchanged or expanded. The level of evidence

2015 National Health and Medical Research Council

190. Behavioral, Psychological, Educational and Vocational Interventions to Facilitate Employment Outcomes for Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review

of participants, personnel, and outcome measurement. Potential attrition bias resulting from incomplete outcome data was assessed by recording attrition, exclusions, reasons for exclusions, and any re- inclusions. Lastly, we assessed potential reporting bias, i.e., whether selective outcomes were reported. 3.6 CALCULATING EFFECT SIZES We used Comprehensive Meta-analysis software (Borenstein, Hedges, Higgins, & Rothstein, 2005) for all statistical calculations. Only studies using an experimental or quasi (...) and Justice David B. Wilson, George Mason University, USA Education Sandra Wilson, Vanderbilt University, USA International Development Birte Snilstveit, 3ie, UK Hugh Waddington, 3ie, UK Social Welfare Nick Huband, Institute of Mental Health, University of Nottingham, UK Geraldine Macdonald, Queen’s University, UK & Cochrane Developmental, Psychosocial and Learning Problems Group Methods Therese Pigott, Loyola University, USA Emily Tanner-Smith, Vanderbilt University, USA Managing Editor Karianne Thune

2015 Campbell Collaboration

191. Skin cancer prevention

and improves people's overall physical and mental wellbeing. Skin cancer prevention activities may inadvertently reduce physical activity levels as people aim to avoid exposure to the sun. It is important that prevention activities do not discourage outdoor physical activity but, rather, encourage people to use sensible skin protection. Behaviour change The principles outlined in NICE's behaviour change: general approaches guidance (see section 7) were used as the basis for making recommendations on how (...) of cancer diagnosed in 2005, England. London: Office for National Statistics Office for National Statistics (2009b) Mortality statistics: cause. England and Wales 2008. London: Office for National Statistics Ruston D, Hoare J, Henderson L, et al. (2004) The national diet and nutrition survey: adults aged 19–64 years. Volume 4: nutritional status (anthropometry and blood analytes), blood pressure and physical activity. London: The Stationery Office Walsh A, Harris S, Bowtell N et al. (2009) Sunbed

2011 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

192. Type 2 diabetes prevention: population and community-level interventions

practices and any fears people may have about the safety of areas where physical activities take place (this includes fears about how safe it is to travel there and back). Map physical activity opportunities against local needs and address any gaps in provision. Ensure commissioned leisure services are affordable and acceptable to those at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. This means providing affordable childcare facilities. It also means public transport links should be affordable (...) could be encouraged to be active in lunch breaks and at other times through organised walks and subsidies for local leisure facilities [17] Flexible working policies and incentives that promote physical activity in the workplace should be considered [18] . Ensure the basic training for professional fitness instructors covers: the role of physical activity in improving people's health, how to get marginalised groups involved and cultural issues that may prevent them from participating. Type 2

2011 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

193. Kinship Care for the Safety, Permanency, and Well-Being of Children Removed from the Home for Maltreatment: A Systematic Review

, with the highest risk associated with selection bias and the lowest associated with reporting bias. The outcome data suggest that children in kinship foster care experience fewer behavioural problems (standardised mean difference effect size -0.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.49 to -0.17), fewer mental health disorders (odds ratio (OR) 0.51, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.62), better well- being (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.64), and less placement disruption (OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.69) than do children in non-kinship (...) report less daily physical activity, more health problems, higher levels of depression, and less marital satisfaction. Cuddeback also concluded that kinship care families receive less training, services, and financial support than do foster care families. In addition, Cuddeback reported that birth parents rarely receive family preservation services, which means that children in kinship care are less likely than children in foster care to be reunified. Lastly, Cuddeback found inconclusive evidence

2014 Campbell Collaboration

194. Population and Public Health Prenatal Care Pathway

-2121 www.perinatalservicesbc.ca March 2014 (Table of Contents continues on next page)2 Perinatal Services BC Other Mental Health Concerns ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? 32 Early Pregnancy Loss and Grief ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? 34 4? Healthy Lifestyles ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? 36 Exercise and Rest (...) , and mental health concerns 9 ? Utilizing a trauma and violence informed approach does not necessarily require disclosure of violence or trauma? Rather, services are provided in ways that recognize the need for physical and emotional safety, as well emphasizing a woman’s choice and control in decisions affecting her treatment? A key aspect of trauma and violence informed care is to create an environment where women do not experience further traumatization or re-traumatization (events that reflect earlier

2014 British Columbia Perinatal Health Program

195. Evidence Map of Tai Chi

benefits. Many forms of Tai Chi exist, but in West- ern culture, it is most commonly taught as a series of slow, gentle, low-impact movements that integrate the breath, the mind, and physical activity to achieve greater awareness and a sense of inner peace and well-being. 1 Tai Chi incorporates the Chinese concepts of yin and yang, which represent two opposing yet complementary forces described in traditional Chinese medicine. The underlying premise is that good health is achieved by balancing (...) One review found no Tai Chi fall prevention study in older persons with cognitive impairment; the remaining reviews showed conflicting results across studies and did not provide a pooled effect estimate. Some reviews primarily addressing balance also reported on the outcome falls. One of these pooled the available data on falls and found no statistically significant results for Tai Chi. 4 A systematic review that specifically addressed the outcome health-related quality of life across Traditional

2014 Veterans Affairs Evidence-based Synthesis Program Reports

196. Long-term Consequences Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

++ Evidence level 2++ P B BRCOG Green-top Guideline No. 33 7of 15 © Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists All women with PCOS should be assessed for CVD risk by assessing individual CVD risk factors (obesity , lack of physical activity, cigarette smoking, family history of type II diabetes, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, type II diabetes) at the time of initial diagnosis. In clinical practice, hypertension should be treated; however, lipid-lowering treatment (...) women exist in several CVD risk factors that are more profound in obese women with PCOS. 45 Since lifetime risk for CVD is higher in women with PCOS 40–42 and mostly preventable, all women with PCOS should be assessed for CVD risk by assessing individual CVD risk factors (obesity, lack of physical activity, cigarette smoking, family history of type II diabetes, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, type II diabetes) at baseline and treated accordingly. At the time of initial

2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

197. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

to manage each patient’s case in light of the scienti?cally accepted data pursuant to their respective ethical and professional obligations. It is also the health professional’s responsibility to verify the applicable rules and regulations relating to drugs and medical devices at the time of prescription. National Cardiac Societies document reviewers: listed in Appendix 1 &The European Society of Cardiology 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com. European (...) of the published evidence for management (including diagno- sis, treatment, prevention and rehabilitation) of a given condition according to ESC Committee for Practice Guidelines (CPG) policy. A critical evaluation of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures was performed including assessment of the risk-bene?t-ratio. Estimates of expected health outcomes for larger populations were included, where data exist. The level of evidence and the strength of recom- mendation of particular management options were weighed

2014 European Society of Cardiology

198. Aortic Diseases

with the medical care of patients with this pathology.Selectedexpertsinthe?eldundertookacomprehensive reviewofthepublishedevidenceformanagement(includingdiagno- sis, treatment, prevention and rehabilitation) of a given condition accordingto ESC Committee forPractice Guidelines (CPG)policy. A critical evaluation of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures was performed including assessment of the risk-bene?t-ratio. Estimates of expected health outcomes for larger populations wereincluded, where data exist (...) ?rstdocumentsintheworldrelatingtodiseaseoftheaorta and was endorsed by the American College of Cardiology (ACC). 3 Since that time, the diagnostic methods for imaging the aorta have improvedsigni?cantly,particularlybythedevelopmentofmulti-slice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies. Data on new endovascular and surgical approaches have increased substantially during the past 10 years. Datafrommultipleregistrieshavebeenpublished,suchastheInter- national Registry of Aortic Dissection (IRAD) 4 and the German

2014 European Society of Cardiology

199. Lifestyle risk factors and the primary prevention of cancer

activity and sedentary behaviour in Australia Data from the 2011-12 Australian Health Survey indicate that 60% of Australian adults do less than 30 minutes of exercise per day. 53 Around 30% of the adult population reported more than 5 hours of sedentary leisure activity each day. 53 Physical activity The 2007 WCRF and AICR report and tumour-specific updates identified that physical activity protects against certain cancers and also limits weight gain, itself a cause of some cancers. 8-15 (...) 3 Methodology and scope 4 Impact of cancer 5 Primary prevention of cancer 6 Lifestyle risk factors 7 Tobacco 8 Overweight and obesity 10 Physical activity and sedentary behaviour 13 Diet 15 Alcohol 18 UV radiation 20 Infections 22 Conclusion 24 References 25 Appendix 1 29 Appendix 2 31 Position Statement - Lifestyle risk factors and the primary prevention of cancer page 2 of 31Recommendations It is estimated that at least one third of all cancer cases are preventable, 1 and that potentially more

2015 Cancer Australia

200. Exploratory examination of the need for revision of the DMP "coronary heart disease"

stress and is constant over months. In contrast, acute phases of CHD that are directly life-threatening or fatal are summarized under the term “acute coronary syndrome”. This also includes unstable AP occurring under slight or no physical activity, myocardial infarction with or without ST-segment elevations, as well as sudden cardiac death [11,12]. Risk factors for the development of CHD include increasing age, male sex, smoking, obesity, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, and diabetes mellitus (...) a detailed and evidence-based treatment plan describing drug intake, time of follow-up, suitable measures of physical activity and diet, as well as adherence to measures of secondary prevention. The tertiary source DynaMed notes that telephone-based care (telehome care) reduces readmissions to hospitals and improves quality of life. 4.2.1.4 Drug therapy Five guidelines (ACCF 2012, AHA 2014, AHA 2011, ESC 2013, ESC 2011) and 2 tertiary sources (DynaMed, UpToDate) contain statements on drug therapy

2017 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Healthcare (IQWiG)

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