How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

489 results for

("physical activity" OR "physical exercise" OR "physical fitness") AND (leisure OR "active travel" OR "sports participation" OR housework OR mental) AND (statistics OR data) 〈=en

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

481. Promoting Asthma Control in Children

, the Level IV level of control should be assessed based on : short-acting ß 2 -agonist use daytime symptoms night-time symptoms physical activity absence from school/work exacerbations ** If suspected of having asthma, further evaluation by a physician is required. 1.3 For children identified as potentially having uncontrolled asthma, Level IV the level of acuity needs to be assessed by the nurse and an appropriate medical referral provided (i.e., urgent care or follow-up appointment). Medications (...) or limitation in physical activity (BTS/SIGN, 2003). It is important to note that people who died as a result of asthma were four times more likely than controls to have reported daily ß 2 -agonist use and night/early morning symptoms over the previous year (Hessel et al., 1999). Typically individuals who have died from asthma have experienced uncontrolled asthma for some time prior to the development of the fatal attack. It is key that nurses ensure that children and/or their care providers know how

2004 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

482. Nursing Care of Dyspnea:The 6th Vital Sign in Individuals with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

makes the best use of available information, be that of scientific data or the collective wisdom of the participants (Black et al., 1999).17 Nursing Best Practice Guideline Education Recommendations: Statements of educational requirements and educational approaches/strategies for the introduction, implementation and sustainability of the best practice guideline. Evidence: “An observation, fact or organized body of information offered to support or justify inferences or beliefs in the demonstration (...) of some proposition or matter at issue” (Madjar & Walton, 2001, p.28). Meta-analysis: The use of statistical methods to summarize the results of independent studies, thus providing more precise estimates of the effects of healthcare than those derived from the individual studies included in a review (Alderson, Green & Higgins, 2004). Organization & Policy Recommendations: Statements of conditions required for a practice setting that enable the successful implementation of the best practice guideline

2005 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

483. Stroke Assessment Across the Continuum of Care

of dehydration and malnutrition. In situations where impairments are identified, clients should be referred to a trained healthcare professional for further assessment and management. Cognition/ 8.0 Nurses in all practice settings should screen clients for alterations in cognitive, IV Perception/ perceptual and language function that may impair safety, using validated tools Language (such as the Modified Mini-Mental Status Examination and the Line Bisection Test). This screening should be completed (...) 15.0 Nurses in all practice settings should document comprehensive information IV regarding assessment and/or screening of stroke clients. All data should be documented at the time of assessment and reassessment. Stroke Assessment Across the Continuum of Care 14 RECOMMENDATION LEVEL OF EVIDENCE15 Nursing Best Practice Guideline RECOMMENDATION LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Education Recommendations 16.0 Basic education for entry to practice should include: IV ¦ Basic anatomy and physiology

2005 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

484. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of advanced breast cancer

or other medical conditions. Symptoms which affect quality of life include nausea, pain, dyspnoea, tiredness, anorexia, vomiting, constipation, abdominal bloating and lymphoedema. Loss of function may relate to the performance of (or capacity to perform) a variety of activities that are normal for most people. Such activities may include self-care activities (feeding, dressing, bathing), mobility (ability to move indoors/ outdoors), physical activities (walking, lifting, bending) and role activities (...) (work, school, household activities). When women with advanced breast cancer are asked to rank quality of life issues in terms of importance, general health items such as self-care, mobility, physical activity, appetite and sleep are ranked in the upper quartile of importance (Level IV). 35 As women with advanced breast cancer enter the phase of palliative care, pain and a variety of other symptoms need active treatment. When pain and fatigue are less well controlled, psychological distress

2000 Cancer Australia

485. Clinical practice guidelines for the psychosocial care of adults with cancer

a significant impact on the lives of many Australians. Excluding non-melanocytic skin cancers, there were 80,864 new cancer cases and 34,270 deaths due to cancer in Australia in 1998. Based on 1998 rates, it is expected that one in three men and one in four women will be directly affected by cancer by age 75. Recent Australian survival data shows that approximately 60% of people diagnosed with cancer are still alive five years later.This excludes non-melanocytic skin cancers, which have a relatively low (...) AND BACKGROUND 1.1 THE IMPACT OF CANCER Cancer has a significant impact on the lives of many Australians. Excluding non-melanocytic skin cancers, there were 80,864 new cases and 34,270 deaths due to cancer in Australia in 1998. Based on 1998 rates, it is expected that one in three men and one in four women will be directly affected by cancer by age 75. 1 Recent Australian survival data shows that approximately 60% of people diagnosed with cancer are still alive five years later. 2 This excludes non

2002 Cancer Australia

486. Enhancing Healthy Adolescent Development

, 2005). Regular family income results in good nutrition and a safe place to live. A shortage of food and a lack of variety or excess intake contribute to chronic malnutrition and such chronic diseases as diabetes and obesity (Wilkinson & Marmot, 2003). Emerging evidence demonstrates an association between family income and such aspects of well-being as physical activity levels and youth self-esteem (Abernathy, Webster, & Vermeulen, 2002). Social Support Networks Within the youth population (...) ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Appendix B – Revision Process (2009–2010) 79 Appendix C – Process for Literature Review/Search Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Appendix D – Health Status of Adolescents 82 Appendix E – Aboriginal Cultural Identity – T en C onsiderations and Strategies 86 Appendix F – F orty Developmental Assets (for adolescents aged 12 to 18 years) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Appendix G – Key Influences on Y outh Health and Development

2002 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

487. Effects of Hesperidin on Bone Mineral Density and Bone Metabolism of Postmenopausal Women

(BMD) while the secondary outcome measures are changes in bone resorption and formation markers as well as body composition. The women are randomised to consume 2 servings of hesperidin-rich food or food without hesperidin but with the same taste & appearance (placebo). Subjects will undergo medical screening, anthropometry, physical activity, dietary assessments and BMD before randomisation into placebo or active group. Follow-up measurements are made at 3-month intervals (for blood and urine (...) Volunteers: Yes Criteria Inclusion Criteria: 50 - 65 years, Caucasian female Community dwelling women· Within 3-10 years post-menopause (natural or surgical) and FSH > 20UI/L· Generally healthy as determined by standard medical assessment on physical and mental health · Normal weight as determined by BMI (19≤ BMI ≤29)· Affiliated to National Health Insurance (Sécurité Sociale)· Willing to comply with the study procedures· Willing to accept use of all nameless data, including publication

2006 Clinical Trials

488. L'OMS en Europe : quarante années : l'élaboration d'une politique commune de la santé

L'OMS en Europe : quarante années : l'élaboration d'une politique commune de la santé L'OMS en Europe : quarante années : l'élaboration d'une politique commune de la santé JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Toggle navigation Toggle navigation Search Browse Statistics Related Links L'OMS en Europe : quarante années : l'élaboration d'une politique commune de la santé View/ Open View Statistics Altmetrics Share Citation Organisation (...) . The network meets twice yearly in different locations. The Seventh Meeting of the European ...  WHO European Ministerial Conference on Counteracting Obesity : Diet and Physical Activity for Health (‎2006 : Istanbul, Turkey)‎ ; World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe (‎ EUR/06/5062700/BD/2 , 2006 )‎  World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe (‎ EUR/03/5035226A , 2003 )‎ In line with the First Action Plan for Food and Nutrition Policy for the WHO European Region, 2000-2005

1992 WHO

489. L'OMS en Europe : relever les défis

liaison between the WHO Regional Adviser for Mental Health and the mental health services in countries. These counterparts have been officially nominated by their health ministries and are often working in the ministry or are the most senior government mental health professionals. The network meets twice yearly in different locations. The Seventh Meeting of the European ...  WHO European Ministerial Conference on Counteracting Obesity : Diet and Physical Activity for Health (‎2006 : Istanbul, Turkey (...) L'OMS en Europe : relever les défis L'OMS en Europe : relever les défis JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Toggle navigation Toggle navigation Search Browse Statistics Related Links L'OMS en Europe : relever les défis View/ Open View Statistics Altmetrics Share Citation Organisation mondiale de la Santé. Bureau régional de l’Europe . (‎1995)‎. L'OMS en Europe : relever les défis. Organisation mondiale de la Santé. Bureau régional de

1995 WHO

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>