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161. Early Sexual Intercourse: Prospective Associations with Adolescents Physical Activity and Screen Time (PubMed)

Early Sexual Intercourse: Prospective Associations with Adolescents Physical Activity and Screen Time To assess the prospective associations of physical activity behaviors and screen time with early sexual intercourse initiation (i.e., before 15 years) in a large sample of adolescents.We used two waves of data from the Rotterdam Youth Monitor, a longitudinal study conducted in the Netherlands. The analysis sample consisted of 2,141 adolescents aged 12 to 14 years (mean age at baseline = 12.2 (...) years, SD = 0.43). Physical activity (e.g., sports outside school), screen time (e.g., computer use), and early sexual intercourse initiation were assessed by means of self-report questionnaires. Logistic regression models were tested to assess the associations of physical activity behaviors and screen time (separately and simultaneously) with early sexual intercourse initiation, controlling for confounders (i.e., socio-demographics and substance use). Interaction effects with gender were tested

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2016 PloS one

162. A 5-year longitudinal analysis of modifiable predictors for outdoor play and screen-time of 2- to 5-year-olds (PubMed)

A 5-year longitudinal analysis of modifiable predictors for outdoor play and screen-time of 2- to 5-year-olds Early childhood is a critical time for establishing physical activity and sedentary behaviours. Identifying modifiable predictors of physical activity and sedentary behaviours in the early life stages can inform the development of early intervention programs. The aim of this study was to identify modifiable predictors of outdoor play (a proxy of physical activity) and screen-time in 2 (...) - to 5-year-olds.A longitudinal data analysis was conducted using 5-year follow-up data from the Healthy Beginnings Trial undertaken in Sydney, Australia from 2007 to 2013. A total of 667 pregnant women were recruited for the study. Information on mothers' demographics, physical activity, screen-time, knowledge of child development, and awareness of childhood obesity during pregnancy (at baseline); children's tummy time (a colloquial term describing the time when a baby is placed on his or her

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2016 The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity

163. Screen Time on School Days and Risks for Psychiatric Symptoms and Self-Harm in Mainland Chinese Adolescents (PubMed)

Screen Time on School Days and Risks for Psychiatric Symptoms and Self-Harm in Mainland Chinese Adolescents To investigate associations of television and of video game or non-educational computer use (VG/CU) exposure volumes in a typical school day with psychiatric symptoms and suicidal ideation/self-injurious behavior (self-harm), in mainland Chinese adolescents.Secondary school pupils (N = 13,659; mean age: 15.18 ± 1.89) from 10 urban areas sampled from different regions of mainland China

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2016 Frontiers in psychology

164. Youth Screen Time and Behavioral Health Problems: The Role of Sleep Duration and Disturbances (PubMed)

Youth Screen Time and Behavioral Health Problems: The Role of Sleep Duration and Disturbances The purpose of this study was to examine the indirect effect of youth screen time (e.g., television, computers, smartphones, video games, and tablets) on behavioral health problems (i.e., internalizing, externalizing, and peer problems) through sleep duration and disturbances.The authors assessed a community sample of parents with a child in one of the following three developmental stages: young (...) childhood (3-7 yrs; N = 209), middle childhood (8-12 yrs; N = 202), and adolescence (13-17 yrs; N = 210). Path analysis was used to test the hypothesized indirect effect model.Findings indicated that, regardless of the developmental stage of the youth, higher levels of youth screen time were associated with more sleep disturbances, which, in turn, were linked to higher levels of youth behavioral health problems.Children who have increased screen time are more likely to have poor sleep quality

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2016 Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics : JDBP

165. Joint Association of Screen Time and Physical Activity with Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in a National Sample of Iranian Adolescents: The CASPIANIII Study (PubMed)

Joint Association of Screen Time and Physical Activity with Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in a National Sample of Iranian Adolescents: The CASPIANIII Study Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its contributing factors are considered important health problems in the pediatric age group. This study was designed to assess the joint association of ST and PA with cardiometabolic risk factors among Iranian adolescents. A representative sample of 5625 (50.2% boys) school students with a mean age of 14.73 (SD

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2016 PloS one

166. Level of physical activity and screen time among Iranian children and adolescents at the national and provincial level: The CASPIAN-IV study (PubMed)

Level of physical activity and screen time among Iranian children and adolescents at the national and provincial level: The CASPIAN-IV study Background: There are few epidemiological reports on adherence to physical activity (PA) and screen-time (ST) recommendations among Iranian children and adolescents at the provincial level. We used nationally representative data to provide recent prevalence estimates of Iranian children who met the recommendations for PA and ST. Methods: This nationwide

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2016 Medical journal of the Islamic Republic of Iran

167. Physical activity, screen time and the risk of subjective health complaints in school-aged children. (PubMed)

Physical activity, screen time and the risk of subjective health complaints in school-aged children. Internationally, subjective health complaints have become increasingly prevalent in children. Thus, a comprehensive understanding of the determinants of health complaints is needed to inform effective policies and strategies. This study explores if meeting physical activity and total screen time (TST) recommendations are associated with the risk of reporting health complaints weekly or more

2016 Preventive Medicine

168. The relationship between screen time, nighttime sleep duration, and behavioural problems in preschool children in China. (PubMed)

The relationship between screen time, nighttime sleep duration, and behavioural problems in preschool children in China. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationships between screen time (ST), nighttime sleep duration, and behavioural problems in a sample of preschool children in China. A sample of 8900 children aged 3-6 years was enrolled from 35 kindergartens, in four cities, in two provinces, in China to evaluate the relationships between ST, nighttime sleep duration

2016 European child & adolescent psychiatry

169. Does body mass index modify the association between physical activity and screen time with cardio-metabolic risk factors in adolescents? Findings from a countrywide survey. (PubMed)

Does body mass index modify the association between physical activity and screen time with cardio-metabolic risk factors in adolescents? Findings from a countrywide survey. Moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and screen time (ST) have been associated with cardiometabolic health in youth. However, previous studies are conflicting whether these associations are independent of each other and it is unknown if they are modified by adiposity. We aimed to examine the independent and joint

2016 International Journal of Obesity

170. Impact of screen time on mental health problems progression in youth: a 1-year follow-up study. (PubMed)

Impact of screen time on mental health problems progression in youth: a 1-year follow-up study. We examined the relationships between screen time (ST) and mental health problems and also increment of ST and progression of mental health problems in a college-based sample of Chinese youth.We assessed 2521 Chinese college freshmen from October 2013 to December 2014. At baseline, the mean age of participants was 18.43 years (SD 0.96 years), and 1215 (48.2%) participants reported ST >2 h/day. We

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2016 BMJ open

171. Pre-meal screen-time activities increase subjective emotions, but not food intake in young girls. (PubMed)

Pre-meal screen-time activities increase subjective emotions, but not food intake in young girls. To determine the effect of pre-meal screen-time activities on subjective emotions, subjective appetite, and food intake (FI) in 9-14 year-old girls.In this clinical study, 31 girls completed four 45-min treatment conditions of television viewing (TVV), video game playing (VGP), a challenging computer task (CT), and sitting without screen exposure (control) in a randomized order. Each treatment (...) condition for average appetite or FI. Despite a change in subjective emotions during the VGP condition, there was no increase in subjective appetite or subsequent FI. These findings suggest that physiologic signals of satiation and satiety are not overridden by environmental stimuli of pre-meal screen-time exposure among young girls. (Clinical trial number NCT01750177).Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

2016 Appetite

172. Examining the bidirectional relationship between physical activity, screen time, and symptoms of anxiety and depression over time during adolescence. (PubMed)

Examining the bidirectional relationship between physical activity, screen time, and symptoms of anxiety and depression over time during adolescence. More physical activity (PA) and less screen time (ST) are positively associated with mental health in adolescents; however, research is limited by short-term designs and the exclusion of ST when examining PA. We examined: (a) changes in PA, ST, symptoms of depression, and symptoms of anxiety over four assessments spanning 11years, and (b

2016 Preventive Medicine

173. A systematic review and meta-analysis of screen time behaviour among North American indigenous populations. (PubMed)

A systematic review and meta-analysis of screen time behaviour among North American indigenous populations. Screen time (computer, television, video game and smartphone/tablet activity) is associated with increased obesity and other health risks. This systematic review evaluates screen time among North American Indigenous populations and compares it with that of North American Europeans. Electronic databases (e.g. MEDLINE and EMBASE) were searched, and citations cross-referenced. Included (...) articles reported screen time among First Nations/American Indians, Métis, Inuit/Alaskan Natives or Native Hawaiians. From 788 citations evaluated, 40 identified articles report television, video game, computer and/or overall screen time. Overall screen time was 3.65 ± 1.26 h day(-1) (n = 2,242, 8 articles) among Indigenous children/youth and 3.61 ± 2.95 h day(-1) (n = 155, 1 article) among adults. Among children/youth, 66.0% (n = 11 256, 9 articles) reported less than 2 h day(-1) of television screen

2016 Obesity reviews : an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity

174. Association of screen time with self-perceived attention problems and hyperactivity levels in French students: a cross-sectional study. (PubMed)

Association of screen time with self-perceived attention problems and hyperactivity levels in French students: a cross-sectional study. To investigate whether high levels of screen time exposure are associated with self-perceived levels of attention problems and hyperactivity in higher education students.Cross-sectional study among participants of the i-Share cohort.French-speaking students of universities and higher education institutions.4816 graduate students who were at least 18 years (...) participants of this study had a mean age of 20.8 years and 75.5% were female. Multivariable ordinary regression models showed significant associations of screen time exposure with quintiles of the total score of self-perceived attention problems and hyperactivity levels as well as the individual domains. Compared to the lowest screen time exposure category, the ORs (95% CI) were 1.58 (1.37 to 1.82) for each increasing level of quintiles of the global score, 1.57 (1.36 to 1.81) for increasing quintiles

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2016 BMJ open

175. Changes in physical activity and screen time related to psychological well-being in early adolescence: findings from longitudinal study ELANA. (PubMed)

Changes in physical activity and screen time related to psychological well-being in early adolescence: findings from longitudinal study ELANA. Psychological well-being influences health behaviours differently in adolescent boys and girls. We evaluated the role of psychological well-being in early adolescence in the onset and persistence of insufficient physical activity and exceeding recommended screen time, depending on gender.This work derives from a cohort study called Longitudinal Study (...) of Adolescent Nutritional Assessment conducted among elementary school students from two public and four private schools in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from 2010-2013. We analysed data from 2010 and 2012 from 526 adolescents. Physical activity was evaluated using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Those who performed less than 60 min per day of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were classified as insufficiently active. Screen time was evaluated based on daily time spent in front

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2016 BMC Public Health

176. The Roles of General and Technology-Related Parenting in Managing Youth Screen Time (PubMed)

The Roles of General and Technology-Related Parenting in Managing Youth Screen Time This study examines the associations of 2 types of parenting practices-general adaptive parenting and technology-related strategies-with youth screen time. We hypothesized that technology-related parenting focused on behavioral control would relate directly to screen time and serve to link general parenting to screen time. Participants were 615 parents drawn from 3 community samples of families with children (...) across 3 development stages: young childhood (3-7 years; n = 210), middle childhood (8-12 years; n = 200), and adolescents (13-17 years; n = 205). Using structural equation modeling, we found that general adaptive parenting was not related to child screen time but was positively related to technology-related parenting strategies for all 3 samples. For the young and, to some extent, middle childhood samples, but not for the adolescent sample, general adaptive parenting was positively linked to youth

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2016 Journal of family psychology : JFP : journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43)

177. The Associations of Youth Physical Activity and Screen Time with Fatness and Fitness: The 2012 NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey (PubMed)

The Associations of Youth Physical Activity and Screen Time with Fatness and Fitness: The 2012 NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey The purpose of the study is to examine the associations of youth physical activity and screen time with weight status and cardiorespiratory fitness in children and adolescents, separately, utilizing a nationally representative sample. A total of 1,113 participants (692 children aged 6-11 yrs; 422 adolescents aged 12-15 yrs) from the 2012 NHANES National Youth (...) Fitness Survey. Participants completed physical activity and screen time questionnaires, and their body mass index and cardiorespiratory fitness (adolescents only) were assessed. Adolescents completed additional physical activity questions to estimate daily MET minutes. Children not meeting the screen time guideline had 1.69 times the odds of being overweight/obese compared to those meeting the screen time guideline, after adjusting for physical activity and other control variables. Among adolescent

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2016 PloS one

178. Parental perceptions of technology and technology-focused parenting: Associations with youth screen time (PubMed)

Parental perceptions of technology and technology-focused parenting: Associations with youth screen time In the present study we propose a model linking parental perceptions of technology to technology-related parenting strategies to youth screen time, and, finally, to internalizing and externalizing problem behaviors. Participants were 615 parents drawn from three community samples of families with children across three developmental stages: young childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence (...) . The model was tested at each stage with the strongest support emerging in the young childhood sample. One component of parental perceptions of technology, perceived efficacy, was related to technology-related parenting strategies across developmental stages. However, the association of these strategies to child screen time and, in turn, problem behaviors, diminished as children increased in age. Implications for intervention are considered.

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2016 Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology

179. Physical Activity and Screen-Time Regulations in Childcare Centers

Physical Activity and Screen-Time Regulations in Childcare Centers Physical Activity and Screen-Time Regulations in Childcare Centers - Aim 2 - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Physical (...) Activity and Screen-Time Regulations in Childcare Centers - Aim 2 (Pause and Play) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02751814 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : April 26, 2016 Last Update Posted : September 7, 2018 Sponsor: Pennington Biomedical Research Center Collaborator

2016 Clinical Trials

180. Physical Activity and Screen-Time Regulations in Childcare Centers

Physical Activity and Screen-Time Regulations in Childcare Centers Physical Activity and Screen-Time Regulations in Childcare Centers - Aim 1 - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Physical (...) Activity and Screen-Time Regulations in Childcare Centers - Aim 1 (Pause and Play) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02751788 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : April 26, 2016 Last Update Posted : September 25, 2018 Sponsor: Pennington Biomedical Research Center Collaborator

2016 Clinical Trials

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