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141. The Role of Uncontrolled Eating and Screen Time in the Link of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder with Weight in Late Childhood Full Text available with Trip Pro

The Role of Uncontrolled Eating and Screen Time in the Link of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder with Weight in Late Childhood The aim of this study was to examine the mediating roles of uncontrolled eating and sedentary behaviours in the link of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and weight.A total of 352 children in fifth and sixth grade participated in the present study by completing the self-rated Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire and Children of Alcoholics Screening (...) Test during regular classes. An additional questionnaire completed by their parents provided information about the children's ADHD and emotional symptoms, sedentary behaviour based on screen time, and parental variables. The questionnaires were surveyed within one week after their schools' annual physical check-up.Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that uncontrolled eating was complete mediator in association between ADHD symptoms and body mass index (BMI) for boys, incomplete mediator

2017 Psychiatry investigation

142. Association between screen time and depression among US adults Full Text available with Trip Pro

Association between screen time and depression among US adults Epidemiological surveys conducted in general populations have found that the prevalence of depression is about 9% in the United States. World Health Organization has projected that depression will be leading cause of disease burden by the year 2030. Growing evidence suggests that sedentary lifestyle is an important risk factor of depression among adults. The relationship between television watching/computer use and depression in US (...) , and demographic information were obtained from NHANES data set. SAS®9.4was used to perform all statistical analyses and final model selection procedure. Depression was found to be significantly higher among female. Results showed that moderate or severe depression level was associated with higher time spent on TV watching and use of computer (> 6 h/day) (adjusted odds ratio: 2.3, 95% CI: 1.602-3.442). Duration of screen time was significantly associated when all covariates were adjusted. TV watching

2017 Preventive medicine reports

143. Association between objectively evaluated physical activity and sedentary behavior and screen time in primary school children Full Text available with Trip Pro

Association between objectively evaluated physical activity and sedentary behavior and screen time in primary school children Even when meeting guidelines for physical activity (PA), considerable sedentary time may be included. This study in primary school children investigated the relationships between objectively evaluated sedentary and PA times at different intensities using triaxial accelerometry that discriminated between ambulatory and non-ambulatory PA. The relationships between (...) subjectively evaluated screen time (i.e. time spent viewing television and videos, playing electronic games, and using personal computers) and objectively evaluated sedentary and PA times were examined.Objectively evaluated sedentary and PA times were assessed for 7 consecutive days using a triaxial accelerometer (Active style Pro: HJA-350IT) in 426 first to sixth grade girls and boys. Metabolic equivalents [METs] were used to categorize the minutes of sedentary time (≤1.5 METs), light PA (LPA, 1.6-2.9

2017 BMC research notes

144. Overweight, obesity, and screen-time viewing among Chinese school-aged children: National prevalence estimates from the 2016 Physical Activity and Fitness in China—The Youth Study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Overweight, obesity, and screen-time viewing among Chinese school-aged children: National prevalence estimates from the 2016 Physical Activity and Fitness in China—The Youth Study This study presents the most recent estimates of prevalence of overweight, obesity, and screen-time viewing among Chinese school-aged children. Demographic differences in these estimates between sexes and resident locales were also examined.Cross-sectional analyses of 116,615 Chinese school children 9 to 17 years (...) of age who participated in the 2016 Physical Activity and Fitness in China-The Youth Study project. Outcomes were the prevalence of children's overweight (85th ≤ body mass index (BMI) < 95th percentile) and obesity (BMI ≥95th percentile) (defined by the Working Group on Obesity in China) and not meeting screen-time viewing recommendations ("not meeting" was defined as more than 2 h per day of viewing activities after school). Analyses were conducted on the whole sample and by school grade cohorts

2017 Journal of sport and health science

145. PSA screening: Time to overcome our brand confusion Full Text available with Trip Pro

PSA screening: Time to overcome our brand confusion 29382439 2019 01 29 1911-6470 11 10 2017 Oct Canadian Urological Association journal = Journal de l'Association des urologues du Canada Can Urol Assoc J PSA screening: Time to overcome our brand confusion. 295-296 10.5489/cuaj.4913 Siemens D Robert DR CUAJ Editor-in-Chief and Department of Urology, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada. Gleave Martin M Department of Urology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. eng

2017 Canadian Urological Association Journal

146. Screen time and young children: Promoting health and development in a digital world Full Text available with Trip Pro

Screen time and young children: Promoting health and development in a digital world The digital landscape is evolving more quickly than research on the effects of screen media on the development, learning and family life of young children. This statement examines the potential benefits and risks of screen media in children younger than 5 years, focusing on developmental, psychosocial and physical health. Evidence-based guidance to optimize and support children's early media experiences involves

2017 Paediatrics & child health

147. Mortality Risk Reductions from Substituting Screen-Time by Discretionary Activities Full Text available with Trip Pro

Mortality Risk Reductions from Substituting Screen-Time by Discretionary Activities Leisure screen time, including TV viewing, is associated with increased mortality risk. We estimated the all-cause mortality risk reductions associated with substituting leisure screen time with different discretionary physical activity types, and the change in mortality incidence associated with different substitution scenarios.A total of 423,659 UK Biobank participants, without stroke, myocardial infarction (...) , or cancer history, were followed for 7.6 (1.4) yr, median (interquartile range [IQR]). They reported leisure screen time (TV watching and home computer use) and leisure/home activities, categorized as daily life activities (walking for pleasure, light do-it-yourself [DIY], and heavy DIY) and structured exercise (strenuous sports and other exercises). Isotemporal substitution modeling in Cox regression provided hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for all-cause mortality when substituting screen time

2017 Medicine and science in sports and exercise

148. Associations among Screen Time and Unhealthy Behaviors, Academic Performance, and Well-Being in Chinese Adolescents Full Text available with Trip Pro

Associations among Screen Time and Unhealthy Behaviors, Academic Performance, and Well-Being in Chinese Adolescents Screen time is negatively associated with markers of health in western youth, but very little is known about these relationships in Chinese youth. Middle-school and high-school students (n = 2625) in Wuhan, China, completed questionnaires assessing demographics, health behaviors, and self-perceptions in spring/summer 2016. Linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted (...) to determine whether, after adjustment for covariates, screen time was associated with body mass index (BMI), eating behaviors, average nightly hours of sleep, physical activity (PA), academic performance, and psychological states. Watching television on school days was negatively associated with academic performance, PA, anxiety, and life satisfaction. Television viewing on non-school days was positively associated with sleep duration. Playing electronic games was positively associated with snacking

2017 International journal of environmental research and public health

149. Erratum to: Do the correlates of screen time and sedentary time differ in preschool children? Full Text available with Trip Pro

Erratum to: Do the correlates of screen time and sedentary time differ in preschool children? 28454570 2018 11 13 1471-2458 17 1 2017 04 28 BMC public health BMC Public Health Erratum to: Do the correlates of screen time and sedentary time differ in preschool children? 367 10.1186/s12889-017-4276-x Downing Katherine L KL Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong, Australia. k.downing@deakin.edu.au. Hinkley Trina T

2017 BMC public health

150. Factors Associated with Screen Time in Iranian Children and Adolescents: The CASPIAN-IV Study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Factors Associated with Screen Time in Iranian Children and Adolescents: The CASPIAN-IV Study Prolonged screen time is frequent in children and adolescents. Implementing interventions to reduce physical inactivity needs to assess related determinants. This study aims to assess factors associated with screen time in a national sample of children and adolescents.This nationwide study was conducted among 14,880 students aged 6-18 years. Data collection was performed using questionnaires (...) ) years. The SES, eating junk foods, urban residence, and age had significant association with screen time, watching television (TV), and computer use (P < 0.05). With increasing number of children, the odds ratio of watching TV reduced (P < 0.001). Statistically, significant association existed between obesity and increased time spent watching TV (P < 0.001). Girls spent less likely to use computer and to have prolonged screen time (P < 0.001). Participants in the sense of worthlessness were less

2017 International journal of preventive medicine

151. Macular Carotenoid Supplementation Improves Visual Performance, Sleep Quality, and Adverse Physical Symptoms in Those with High Screen Time Exposure Full Text available with Trip Pro

Macular Carotenoid Supplementation Improves Visual Performance, Sleep Quality, and Adverse Physical Symptoms in Those with High Screen Time Exposure The dramatic rise in the use of smartphones, tablets, and laptop computers over the past decade has raised concerns about potentially deleterious health effects of increased "screen time" (ST) and associated short-wavelength (blue) light exposure. We determined baseline associations and effects of 6 months' supplementation with the macular (...) carotenoids (MC) lutein, zeaxanthin, and mesozeaxanthin on the blue-absorbing macular pigment (MP) and measures of sleep quality, visual performance, and physical indicators of excessive ST. Forty-eight healthy young adults with at least 6 h of daily near-field ST exposure participated in this placebo-controlled trial. Visual performance measures included contrast sensitivity, critical flicker fusion, disability glare, and photostress recovery. Physical indicators of excessive screen time and sleep

2017 Foods Controlled trial quality: uncertain

152. Levels of habitual 24-hour movement behaviours (time spent in physical activity, sedentary behaviour including screen time, and sleep) among 3-4 year olds in sub-Saharan Africa

Levels of habitual 24-hour movement behaviours (time spent in physical activity, sedentary behaviour including screen time, and sleep) among 3-4 year olds in sub-Saharan Africa Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability

2019 PROSPERO

153. What behaviour change techniques are associated with effective interventions to reduce screen time in 0-5 year olds? A systematic review

What behaviour change techniques are associated with effective interventions to reduce screen time in 0-5 year olds? A systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration

2019 PROSPERO

154. A systematic review of the association between screen time and sleep in school-aged children and adolescents

A systematic review of the association between screen time and sleep in school-aged children and adolescents Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files

2019 PROSPERO

155. Measurement of screen time among preschool-aged children: a systematic review

Measurement of screen time among preschool-aged children: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email

2019 PROSPERO

156. The relationship between hours of sleep, screen time and frequency of food and drink consumption in Spain in the 2011 and 2013 ALADINO: a cross-sectional study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

The relationship between hours of sleep, screen time and frequency of food and drink consumption in Spain in the 2011 and 2013 ALADINO: a cross-sectional study. The frequency of intake of food and beverages depends on a number of ill-defined behaviour patterns. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of screen time and sleep duration on food consumption frequency, and to describe frequencies and types of food consumption according to BMI category and parents' level (...) of education.We studied 6287 and 2806 children drawn from the 2011 and 2013 cross-sectional ALADINO studies respectively. Data were collected on number of hours of sleep, screen time, and weekly frequency of consumption of 17 food groups. Weight status was measured, and information was also collected on parents' educational level. Average food consumption frequencies were calculated by reference to hours of sleep and hours of screen time, and were defined as ≥4 times or <4 times per week (once per week

2017 BMC Public Health

157. Longitudinal associations of away-from-home eating, snacking, screen time, and physical activity behaviors with cardiometabolic risk factors among Chinese children and their parents. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Longitudinal associations of away-from-home eating, snacking, screen time, and physical activity behaviors with cardiometabolic risk factors among Chinese children and their parents. Background: Little is known about intergenerational differences in associations of urbanization-related lifestyle behaviors with cardiometabolic risk factors in children and their parents in rapidly urbanizing China.Objective: We tested the intergenerational differences in longitudinal associations of away-from (...) -home eating, snacking, screen time, and leisure-time sports with high waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), elevated blood pressure (BP), elevated glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) among Chinese children and their parents.Design: We studied children enrolled in the longitudinal China Health and Nutrition Survey (1991-2009, 7 surveys) aged 7-17 y in ≥2 surveys (average follow-up: 2.3 surveys out of a possible 4 surveys with the age restriction; n = 3875, including 1175

2017 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

158. Psychometric Properties of a Scale to Assess Parental Self-Efficacy for Influencing Children's Dietary, Physical Activity, Sedentary, and Screen Time Behaviors in Disadvantaged Areas. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Psychometric Properties of a Scale to Assess Parental Self-Efficacy for Influencing Children's Dietary, Physical Activity, Sedentary, and Screen Time Behaviors in Disadvantaged Areas. According to social cognitive theory, self-efficacy is central to behavior change. Consequently, parental self-efficacy (PSE) for influencing children's dietary, physical activity (PA), sedentary, and screen time behaviors is important for child obesity prevention. The aim of this study was to evaluate (...) the psychometric properties of an instrument to measure PSE regarding these behaviors in disadvantaged areas.Parents ( n = 229) of whom 47% had completed secondary school or less, and who participated in the Healthy School Start trial, responded to a 15-item PSE instrument. Children's diet and screen time were measured through parent reports. PA and sedentary behaviors were measured using accelerometers. Construct validity was assessed using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), criterion validity by correlations

2017 Health Education & Behavior

159. Do the correlates of screen time and sedentary time differ in preschool children? Full Text available with Trip Pro

Do the correlates of screen time and sedentary time differ in preschool children? Preschool children can spend up to 12 h a day in sedentary time and few meet current recommendations for screen time. Little is known about ecological correlates that could be targeted to decrease specific versus total sedentary behaviour. This study examined whether the correlates of screen time and sedentary time differ in preschool boys and girls.Parents participating in the HAPPY Study in 2008/09 in Melbourne (...) , Australia reported their child's usual screen time and potential individual, social and physical environment correlates. Children wore ActiGraph GT1M accelerometers for eight days to objectively assess sedentary time (<100 counts.min-1). Multivariable linear regression analyses were performed, stratified by sex and controlling for child age, preschool/childcare attendance and clustering by centre of recruitment. Correlates significantly associated with screen time or sedentary time in individual models

2017 BMC Public Health

160. Clustering and correlates of screen-time and eating behaviours among young adolescents. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Clustering and correlates of screen-time and eating behaviours among young adolescents. Screen-time and eating behaviours are associated in adolescents, but few studies have examined the clustering of these health behaviours in this age group. The identification of clustered health behaviours, and influences on adolescents' clustered health behaviours, at the time when they are most likely to become habitual, is important for intervention design. The purpose of this study was to assess (...) the prevalence and clustering of health behaviours in adolescents, and examine the sociodemographic, individual, behavioural, and home social and physical environmental correlates of clustered health behaviours.Adolescents aged 11-12 years (n = 527, 48% boys) completed a questionnaire during class-time which assessed screen-time (ST), fruit and vegetable (FV), and energy-dense (ED) snack consumption using a Food Frequency Questionnaire. Health behaviours were categorised into high and low frequencies based

2017 BMC Public Health

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