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101. Screen time is associated with adiposity and insulin resistance in children. (PubMed)

Screen time is associated with adiposity and insulin resistance in children. Higher screen time is associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk in adults, but the association with T2D risk markers in children is unclear. We examined associations between self-reported screen time and T2D risk markers in children.Survey of 4495 children aged 9-10 years who had fasting cardiometabolic risk marker assessments, anthropometry measurements and reported daily screen time; objective physical activity (...) was measured in a subset of 2031 children.Compared with an hour or less screen time daily, those reporting screen time over 3 hours had higher ponderal index (1.9%, 95% CI 0.5% to 3.4%), skinfold thickness (4.5%, 0.2% to 8.8%), fat mass index (3.3%, 0.0% to 6.7%), leptin (9.2%, 1.1% to 18.0%) and insulin resistance (10.5%, 4.9% to 16.4%); associations with glucose, HbA1c, physical activity and cardiovascular risk markers were weak or absent. Associations with insulin resistance remained after adjustment

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2017 Archives of Disease in Childhood

102. Out with the old, in with the new: Assessing change in screen time when measurement changes over time (PubMed)

Out with the old, in with the new: Assessing change in screen time when measurement changes over time We examined if screen time can be assessed over time when the measurement protocol has changed to reflect advances in technology. Beginning in 2011, 929 youth (9-12 years at time one) living in in New Brunswick (Canada) self-reported the amount of time spent watching television (cycles 1-13), using computers (cycles 1-13), and playing video games (cycles 3-13). Using longitudinal invariance (...) to test a shifting indicators model of screen time, we found that the relationships between the latent variable reflecting overall screen time and the indicators used to assess screen time were invariant across cycles (weak invariance). We also found that 31 out of 37 indicator intercepts were invariant, meaning that most indicators were answered similarly (i.e., on the same metric) across cycles (partial strong invariance), and that 28 out of 37 indicator residuals were invariant indicating

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2017 Preventive medicine reports

103. The Relationship between Physical Activity and Screen Time with the Risk of Hypertension in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disability (PubMed)

The Relationship between Physical Activity and Screen Time with the Risk of Hypertension in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disability Children and adolescents with intellectual disability (ID) have significantly lower levels of physical activity compared to their peers without ID. Association between the level of physical activity and screen time with hypertension (HPT) in children and adolescents with ID has not been reported yet.To assess the relationship between the level (...) of physical activity and screen time with the prevalence of HPT in students with ID.The study group consisted of 568 children with ID aged 7 to 18. The control group matched for age and gender consisted of 568 students without ID. Blood pressure (BP), body mass and height, level of physical activity, and screen time were assessed.The level of physical activity in the study group was significantly lower than in the control group (score 1.99 versus 3.02, resp., in Physical Activity Questionnaire). The risk

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2017 BioMed research international

104. The combined impact of diet, physical activity, sleep and screen time on academic achievement: a prospective study of elementary school students in Nova Scotia, Canada (PubMed)

The combined impact of diet, physical activity, sleep and screen time on academic achievement: a prospective study of elementary school students in Nova Scotia, Canada Few studies have investigated the independent associations of lifestyle behaviors (diet, physical activity, sleep, and screen time) and body weight status with academic achievement. Even fewer have investigated the combined effect of these behaviors on academic achievement. We hypothesize that the combined effect (...) of these behaviors will have a higher impact on academic achievement than any behavior alone, or that of body weight status.In 2011, 4253 grade 5 (10-11 years old) students and their parents were surveyed about the child's diet, physical activity, screen time and sleep. Students' heights and weights were measured by research assistants. Academic achievement was measured using provincial standardized exams in mathematics, reading and writing, and was expressed as 'meeting' or 'not meeting' expectations as per

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2017 The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity

105. Association between objectively evaluated physical activity and sedentary behavior and screen time in primary school children (PubMed)

Association between objectively evaluated physical activity and sedentary behavior and screen time in primary school children Even when meeting guidelines for physical activity (PA), considerable sedentary time may be included. This study in primary school children investigated the relationships between objectively evaluated sedentary and PA times at different intensities using triaxial accelerometry that discriminated between ambulatory and non-ambulatory PA. The relationships between (...) subjectively evaluated screen time (i.e. time spent viewing television and videos, playing electronic games, and using personal computers) and objectively evaluated sedentary and PA times were examined.Objectively evaluated sedentary and PA times were assessed for 7 consecutive days using a triaxial accelerometer (Active style Pro: HJA-350IT) in 426 first to sixth grade girls and boys. Metabolic equivalents [METs] were used to categorize the minutes of sedentary time (≤1.5 METs), light PA (LPA, 1.6-2.9

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2017 BMC research notes

106. Factors Associated with Screen Time in Iranian Children and Adolescents: The CASPIAN-IV Study (PubMed)

Factors Associated with Screen Time in Iranian Children and Adolescents: The CASPIAN-IV Study Prolonged screen time is frequent in children and adolescents. Implementing interventions to reduce physical inactivity needs to assess related determinants. This study aims to assess factors associated with screen time in a national sample of children and adolescents.This nationwide study was conducted among 14,880 students aged 6-18 years. Data collection was performed using questionnaires (...) ) years. The SES, eating junk foods, urban residence, and age had significant association with screen time, watching television (TV), and computer use (P < 0.05). With increasing number of children, the odds ratio of watching TV reduced (P < 0.001). Statistically, significant association existed between obesity and increased time spent watching TV (P < 0.001). Girls spent less likely to use computer and to have prolonged screen time (P < 0.001). Participants in the sense of worthlessness were less

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2017 International journal of preventive medicine

107. Erratum to: Do the correlates of screen time and sedentary time differ in preschool children? (PubMed)

Erratum to: Do the correlates of screen time and sedentary time differ in preschool children? 28454570 2018 11 13 1471-2458 17 1 2017 04 28 BMC public health BMC Public Health Erratum to: Do the correlates of screen time and sedentary time differ in preschool children? 367 10.1186/s12889-017-4276-x Downing Katherine L KL Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong, Australia. k.downing@deakin.edu.au. Hinkley Trina T

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2017 BMC public health

108. Mortality Risk Reductions from Substituting Screen-Time by Discretionary Activities (PubMed)

Mortality Risk Reductions from Substituting Screen-Time by Discretionary Activities Leisure screen time, including TV viewing, is associated with increased mortality risk. We estimated the all-cause mortality risk reductions associated with substituting leisure screen time with different discretionary physical activity types, and the change in mortality incidence associated with different substitution scenarios.A total of 423,659 UK Biobank participants, without stroke, myocardial infarction (...) , or cancer history, were followed for 7.6 (1.4) yr, median (interquartile range [IQR]). They reported leisure screen time (TV watching and home computer use) and leisure/home activities, categorized as daily life activities (walking for pleasure, light do-it-yourself [DIY], and heavy DIY) and structured exercise (strenuous sports and other exercises). Isotemporal substitution modeling in Cox regression provided hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for all-cause mortality when substituting screen time

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2017 Medicine and science in sports and exercise

109. Associations among Screen Time and Unhealthy Behaviors, Academic Performance, and Well-Being in Chinese Adolescents (PubMed)

Associations among Screen Time and Unhealthy Behaviors, Academic Performance, and Well-Being in Chinese Adolescents Screen time is negatively associated with markers of health in western youth, but very little is known about these relationships in Chinese youth. Middle-school and high-school students (n = 2625) in Wuhan, China, completed questionnaires assessing demographics, health behaviors, and self-perceptions in spring/summer 2016. Linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted (...) to determine whether, after adjustment for covariates, screen time was associated with body mass index (BMI), eating behaviors, average nightly hours of sleep, physical activity (PA), academic performance, and psychological states. Watching television on school days was negatively associated with academic performance, PA, anxiety, and life satisfaction. Television viewing on non-school days was positively associated with sleep duration. Playing electronic games was positively associated with snacking

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2017 International journal of environmental research and public health

110. Association between screen time and depression among US adults (PubMed)

Association between screen time and depression among US adults Epidemiological surveys conducted in general populations have found that the prevalence of depression is about 9% in the United States. World Health Organization has projected that depression will be leading cause of disease burden by the year 2030. Growing evidence suggests that sedentary lifestyle is an important risk factor of depression among adults. The relationship between television watching/computer use and depression in US (...) , and demographic information were obtained from NHANES data set. SAS®9.4was used to perform all statistical analyses and final model selection procedure. Depression was found to be significantly higher among female. Results showed that moderate or severe depression level was associated with higher time spent on TV watching and use of computer (> 6 h/day) (adjusted odds ratio: 2.3, 95% CI: 1.602-3.442). Duration of screen time was significantly associated when all covariates were adjusted. TV watching

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2017 Preventive medicine reports

111. Associations of Caffeinated Beverage Consumption and Screen Time with Excessive Daytime Sleepiness in Korean High School Students (PubMed)

Associations of Caffeinated Beverage Consumption and Screen Time with Excessive Daytime Sleepiness in Korean High School Students The present study investigated caffeinated beverage consumption and screen time in the association with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and sleep duration. We conducted a cross-sectional study including 249 Korean male high school students. These participants responded to a questionnaire inquiring the information on lifestyle factors, consumption of caffeinated (...) drinks than others (p < 0.05). Screen time did not differ according to the categories of sleep duration. Although these findings do not support causal relationships, they suggest that screen time is associated with EDS, but not with sleep duration, and that consumption of certain types of caffeinated beverages is associated with EDS and sleep duration. Adolescents may need to reduce screen time and caffeine consumption to improve sleep quality and avoid daytime sleepiness.

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2017 Clinical nutrition research

112. Associations among physical activity, screen time, and sleep in low socioeconomic status urban girls (PubMed)

Associations among physical activity, screen time, and sleep in low socioeconomic status urban girls Insufficient sleep is associated with higher risk of poor health outcomes in low socioeconomic status (SES) urban elementary age girls. Decreased physical activity (PA) and increased screen time may be associated with poor sleep. This study examined if PA and screen time are associated with sleep in girls from a low SES urban community. Baseline data from 7 to 12 year-old girls (n = 55) from two (...) interventions conducted in Springfield, MA between 2012 and 2015 were used. PA was measured via accelerometry for seven days. Screen time and sleep were assessed via validated questionnaires. Sleep was also assessed via accelerometry in a subsample of girls (n = 24) for 7 days. Associations among PA, screen time, and sleep were analyzed using multiple linear regression. More minutes of screen time per day (p = 0.01, r2 = 0.35, r2 adjusted = 0.23) was associated with worse sleep quality (β = 0.50, p = 0.02

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2017 Preventive medicine reports

113. Overweight, obesity, and screen-time viewing among Chinese school-aged children: National prevalence estimates from the 2016 Physical Activity and Fitness in China—The Youth Study (PubMed)

Overweight, obesity, and screen-time viewing among Chinese school-aged children: National prevalence estimates from the 2016 Physical Activity and Fitness in China—The Youth Study This study presents the most recent estimates of prevalence of overweight, obesity, and screen-time viewing among Chinese school-aged children. Demographic differences in these estimates between sexes and resident locales were also examined.Cross-sectional analyses of 116,615 Chinese school children 9 to 17 years (...) of age who participated in the 2016 Physical Activity and Fitness in China-The Youth Study project. Outcomes were the prevalence of children's overweight (85th ≤ body mass index (BMI) < 95th percentile) and obesity (BMI ≥95th percentile) (defined by the Working Group on Obesity in China) and not meeting screen-time viewing recommendations ("not meeting" was defined as more than 2 h per day of viewing activities after school). Analyses were conducted on the whole sample and by school grade cohorts

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2017 Journal of sport and health science

114. PSA screening: Time to overcome our brand confusion (PubMed)

PSA screening: Time to overcome our brand confusion 29382439 2019 01 29 1911-6470 11 10 2017 Oct Canadian Urological Association journal = Journal de l'Association des urologues du Canada Can Urol Assoc J PSA screening: Time to overcome our brand confusion. 295-296 10.5489/cuaj.4913 Siemens D Robert DR CUAJ Editor-in-Chief and Department of Urology, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada. Gleave Martin M Department of Urology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. eng

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2017 Canadian Urological Association Journal

115. Screen time and young children: Promoting health and development in a digital world (PubMed)

Screen time and young children: Promoting health and development in a digital world The digital landscape is evolving more quickly than research on the effects of screen media on the development, learning and family life of young children. This statement examines the potential benefits and risks of screen media in children younger than 5 years, focusing on developmental, psychosocial and physical health. Evidence-based guidance to optimize and support children's early media experiences involves

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2017 Paediatrics & child health

116. The Role of Uncontrolled Eating and Screen Time in the Link of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder with Weight in Late Childhood (PubMed)

The Role of Uncontrolled Eating and Screen Time in the Link of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder with Weight in Late Childhood The aim of this study was to examine the mediating roles of uncontrolled eating and sedentary behaviours in the link of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and weight.A total of 352 children in fifth and sixth grade participated in the present study by completing the self-rated Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire and Children of Alcoholics Screening (...) Test during regular classes. An additional questionnaire completed by their parents provided information about the children's ADHD and emotional symptoms, sedentary behaviour based on screen time, and parental variables. The questionnaires were surveyed within one week after their schools' annual physical check-up.Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that uncontrolled eating was complete mediator in association between ADHD symptoms and body mass index (BMI) for boys, incomplete mediator

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2017 Psychiatry investigation

117. Association between screen time and snack consumption in children and adolescents: The CASPIAN-IV study. (PubMed)

Association between screen time and snack consumption in children and adolescents: The CASPIAN-IV study. The relationship between screen time (ST) and the frequency of snack consumption in a national sample of Iranian children and adolescents was assessed. The present nationwide survey was conducted on 14,880 school students living in urban and rural areas of 30 provinces in Iran. Trained healthcare providers conducted the physical examination and completed the questionnaire of the World Health

2017 Journal of pediatric endocrinology & metabolism : JPEM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

118. Macular Carotenoid Supplementation Improves Visual Performance, Sleep Quality, and Adverse Physical Symptoms in Those with High Screen Time Exposure (PubMed)

Macular Carotenoid Supplementation Improves Visual Performance, Sleep Quality, and Adverse Physical Symptoms in Those with High Screen Time Exposure The dramatic rise in the use of smartphones, tablets, and laptop computers over the past decade has raised concerns about potentially deleterious health effects of increased "screen time" (ST) and associated short-wavelength (blue) light exposure. We determined baseline associations and effects of 6 months' supplementation with the macular (...) carotenoids (MC) lutein, zeaxanthin, and mesozeaxanthin on the blue-absorbing macular pigment (MP) and measures of sleep quality, visual performance, and physical indicators of excessive ST. Forty-eight healthy young adults with at least 6 h of daily near-field ST exposure participated in this placebo-controlled trial. Visual performance measures included contrast sensitivity, critical flicker fusion, disability glare, and photostress recovery. Physical indicators of excessive screen time and sleep

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2017 Foods Controlled trial quality: uncertain

119. Making the most of screen time: recommendations for families

Making the most of screen time: recommendations for families The AFP Community Blog: Making the most of screen time: recommendations for families | Sunday, June 2, 2019 - Jennifer Middleton, MD, MPH With the academic year wrapping up, planning for the summer months is a reality for many American families. While planning for vacations and other away activities is often paramount, considering in advance how to spend days at home can be equally valuable. Setting expectations and limits on screen (...) time at the beginning of the summer break can set families up for success in encouraging physical activity and good sleep habits. The no screen time for children younger than ages 18-24 months and limiting screen time to one hour of “high-quality programming” for children aged 2-5 years. For older children, the AAP advises setting limits that are consistent with “your family’s values and parenting style.” Engaging in media use with children and teens is preferred to unsupervised use, and families

2019 The AFP Community Blog

120. Correction: Population Screening Using Sewage Reveals Pan-Resistant Bacteria in Hospital and Community Samples. (PubMed)

Correction: Population Screening Using Sewage Reveals Pan-Resistant Bacteria in Hospital and Community Samples. [This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0164873.].

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2017 PLoS ONE

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