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81. Visual Acuity Assessment and Vision Screening Using a Novel Smartphone Application. (PubMed)

Visual Acuity Assessment and Vision Screening Using a Novel Smartphone Application. To evaluate a smartphone-based application's (Peek Acuity) ability to assess visual acuity and screen for ocular conditions in children, we compared visual acuity assessment between Peek Acuity and the pediatric ophthalmology examination and evaluated Peek Acuity's ability to identify children with referable ocular conditions.We prospectively recruited 111 children age 3-17 years, presenting to a pediatric

2019 Journal of Pediatrics Controlled trial quality: uncertain

82. Investigating the feasibility of stratified breast cancer screening using a masking risk predictor. (PubMed)

Investigating the feasibility of stratified breast cancer screening using a masking risk predictor. Women with dense breasts face a double risk for breast cancer; they are at a higher risk for development of breast cancer than those with less dense breasts, and there is a greater chance that mammography will miss detection of a cancer in dense breasts due to the masking effect of surrounding fibroglandular tissue. These women may be candidates for supplemental screening. In this study

2019 Breast cancer research : BCR

83. Feasibility of Automated Cameras to Measure Screen Use in Adolescents. (PubMed)

Feasibility of Automated Cameras to Measure Screen Use in Adolescents. The influence of screens and technology on adolescent well-being is controversial and there is a need to improve methods to measure these behaviors. This study examines the feasibility and acceptability of using automated wearable cameras to measure evening screen use in adolescents.A convenience sample of adolescents (aged 13-17 years, n=15) wore an automated camera for 3 evenings from 5:00pm to bedtime. The camera (Brinno (...) TLC120) captured an image every 15 seconds. Fieldwork was completed between October and December 2017, and data analyzed in 2018. Feasibility was examined by quality of the captured images, wear time, and whether images could be coded in relation to contextual factors (e.g., type of screen and where screen use occurred). Acceptability was examined by participant compliance to the protocol and from an exit interview.Data from 39 evenings were analyzed (41,734 images), with a median of 268 minutes per

2019 American journal of preventive medicine

84. Systematic screening using FRAX<sup>®</sup> leads to increased use of, and adherence to, anti-osteoporosis medications: an analysis of the UK SCOOP trial. (PubMed)

Systematic screening using FRAX® leads to increased use of, and adherence to, anti-osteoporosis medications: an analysis of the UK SCOOP trial. In the large community-based SCOOP trial, systematic fracture risk screening using FRAX® led to greater use of AOM and greater adherence, in women at high fracture risk, compared with usual care.In the SCreening of Older wOmen for Prevention of fracture (SCOOP) trial, we investigated the effect of the screening intervention on subsequent long (...) was associated with poorer adherence (OR per year increase in age 0.96 [95% CI 0.93, 0.99], p = 0.01), whereas history of parental hip fracture was associated with greater rate adherence (OR 1.67 [95% CI 1.23, 2.26], p < 0.01).Systematic fracture risk screening using FRAX® leads to greater use of AOM and greater adherence, in women at high fracture risk, compared with usual care.

2019 Osteoporosis International

85. Self- screening using the Edinburgh post natal depression scale for mothers and fathers to initiate early help seeking behaviours. (PubMed)

Self- screening using the Edinburgh post natal depression scale for mothers and fathers to initiate early help seeking behaviours. The forthcoming birth of a new baby and the life changes that occur can present parents with a range of challenges. While recognised in mothers, postnatal depression is not well researched in fathers; especially considering that up to 25% of men report experiencing depression in the ante and postnatal periods. The aim of this study was to test a self-screening tool

2019 Archives of Psychiatric Nursing Controlled trial quality: uncertain

86. A systematic review of mediators of physical activity, nutrition, and screen time in adolescents: Implications for future research and clinical practice. (PubMed)

A systematic review of mediators of physical activity, nutrition, and screen time in adolescents: Implications for future research and clinical practice. Adolescents are not meeting current recommendations for daily physical activity, nutrition, and screentime which has been associated with overweight and obesity. Understanding the mediators that facilitate teens in improving their healthy lifestyle behaviors may be helpful in halting this crisis.The purpose of this systematic review (...) was to assess published findings regarding mediators of adolescent energy balance behaviors.We followed the Institute of Medicine guidelines for completing a systematic review.Fourteen analyses from 12 studies were included with mediating variables tested for nutrition, physical activity, and screen time. Mediators were identified for all three behaviors and were primarily on the individual level of the social ecological model.Combining findings from this and other reviews of mediators can help guide

2017 Nursing Outlook

87. The role of peer victimization in the physical activity and screen time of adolescents: a cross-sectional study. (PubMed)

The role of peer victimization in the physical activity and screen time of adolescents: a cross-sectional study. Negative peer experiences may lead adolescents with overweight and obesity to be less active and engage in more sitting-related behaviors. Our study is among the first to empirically test these associations and hypothesized that 1) peer victimization would mediate the negative association between body weight status and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and 2) peer (...) victimization would mediate the positive association between body weight status and screen time. Differences by gender were also explored.Participants were a part of the Year 1 data (2012-2013) from the COMPASS study, a prospective cohort study of high school students in Ontario and Alberta, Canada. The final sample consisted of 18,147 students in grades 9 to 12 from 43 Ontario secondary schools. The predictor variable was weight status (non-overweight vs. overweight/obese), the mediator was peer

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2017 BMC Pediatrics

88. The relationship between hours of sleep, screen time and frequency of food and drink consumption in Spain in the 2011 and 2013 ALADINO: a cross-sectional study. (PubMed)

The relationship between hours of sleep, screen time and frequency of food and drink consumption in Spain in the 2011 and 2013 ALADINO: a cross-sectional study. The frequency of intake of food and beverages depends on a number of ill-defined behaviour patterns. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of screen time and sleep duration on food consumption frequency, and to describe frequencies and types of food consumption according to BMI category and parents' level (...) of education.We studied 6287 and 2806 children drawn from the 2011 and 2013 cross-sectional ALADINO studies respectively. Data were collected on number of hours of sleep, screen time, and weekly frequency of consumption of 17 food groups. Weight status was measured, and information was also collected on parents' educational level. Average food consumption frequencies were calculated by reference to hours of sleep and hours of screen time, and were defined as ≥4 times or <4 times per week (once per week

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2017 BMC Public Health

89. Association of individual and neighbourhood socioeconomic status with physical activity and screen time in seventh-grade boys and girls in Berlin, Germany: a cross-sectional study. (PubMed)

Association of individual and neighbourhood socioeconomic status with physical activity and screen time in seventh-grade boys and girls in Berlin, Germany: a cross-sectional study. Few studies have explored the impact of neighbourhood socioeconomic status (SES) on health behaviours in youths in Germany. Our aim was to investigate the association of individual and neighbourhood SES with physical activity (PA) and screen time (ST) in students aged 12-13 years in Berlin.Cross-sectional

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2017 BMJ open

90. Do school physical activity policies and programs have a role in decreasing multiple screen time behaviours among youth? (PubMed)

Do school physical activity policies and programs have a role in decreasing multiple screen time behaviours among youth? Screen time in youth has been associated with a wide range of poor health outcomes. Evidence indicates the need to develop physical activity (PA) school policies and programs that are aimed at decreasing youth screen time behaviours. This study aims to understand the association between PA policies and programs embedded into the functioning of 89 schools across two provinces (...) in Canada and multiple screen time behaviours. As part of the COMPASS Study, a total of 44,861 youth aged between 13 and 18years and belonging to 89 schools in two Canadian provinces completed a validated questionnaire for health behaviours and outcomes data. PA policies and programs were measured using the School Policies and Practices Questionnaire, completed by the relevant school administrator. Participation in before-school, noon hour, or after-school intramural programs, participation in varsity

2017 Preventive Medicine

91. The mediating role of the home environment in relation to parental educational level and preschool children's screen time: a cross-sectional study. (PubMed)

educational level and preschoolers' screen time.A total of 864 children aged 3-6 years and their parents participated in a cross-sectional DAGIS study in 2015-2016. Parents recorded their children's screen time in a diary (N = 823). For the analyses, the daily average screen time at home was calculated. Parental questionnaires (N = 808) assessed educational level and eight social and physical environment factors in the home (i.e., descriptive norm for children's screen time, parental screen use in front (...) mediators in the single-mediator models were included in the final multiple-mediator models.Of the potential eight mediators, the following four had a significant indirect association: descriptive norm for children's screen time, parental screen use in front of children, parental importance for limiting children's screen time, and parental attitude toward societal pressures for children's screen time. Parents with high education had lower descriptive norm and used fewer screens in front of children

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2017 BMC Public Health

92. Objectively measured physical activity patterns, sedentary time and parent-reported screen-time across the day in four-year-old Swedish children. (PubMed)

Objectively measured physical activity patterns, sedentary time and parent-reported screen-time across the day in four-year-old Swedish children. Physical activity (PA) improves health outcomes accumulating evidence suggests that sedentary time (ST), especially parent-reported screen-time, is associated with negative health outcomes in children. The aim of the present study is to describe levels and patterns of PA and ST across the day and week and activity pattern differences between the sexes (...) , across all weekdays and time spent in and outside the preschool in four-year old children.In total 899 four-year old Swedish children who had both complete questionnaire data on screen-time behaviors and objective activity variables and at least 4 days, including one weekend day, with more than 10 h of GT3X+ Actigraph accelerometer wear time data were included in the study. Patterns of PA and ST across the day and week and differences between sexes, weekdays vs. weekend days and time in preschool vs

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2017 BMC Public Health

93. Longitudinal associations of away-from-home eating, snacking, screen time, and physical activity behaviors with cardiometabolic risk factors among Chinese children and their parents. (PubMed)

Longitudinal associations of away-from-home eating, snacking, screen time, and physical activity behaviors with cardiometabolic risk factors among Chinese children and their parents. Background: Little is known about intergenerational differences in associations of urbanization-related lifestyle behaviors with cardiometabolic risk factors in children and their parents in rapidly urbanizing China.Objective: We tested the intergenerational differences in longitudinal associations of away-from (...) -home eating, snacking, screen time, and leisure-time sports with high waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), elevated blood pressure (BP), elevated glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) among Chinese children and their parents.Design: We studied children enrolled in the longitudinal China Health and Nutrition Survey (1991-2009, 7 surveys) aged 7-17 y in ≥2 surveys (average follow-up: 2.3 surveys out of a possible 4 surveys with the age restriction; n = 3875, including 1175

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2017 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

94. Clustering and correlates of screen-time and eating behaviours among young adolescents. (PubMed)

Clustering and correlates of screen-time and eating behaviours among young adolescents. Screen-time and eating behaviours are associated in adolescents, but few studies have examined the clustering of these health behaviours in this age group. The identification of clustered health behaviours, and influences on adolescents' clustered health behaviours, at the time when they are most likely to become habitual, is important for intervention design. The purpose of this study was to assess (...) the prevalence and clustering of health behaviours in adolescents, and examine the sociodemographic, individual, behavioural, and home social and physical environmental correlates of clustered health behaviours.Adolescents aged 11-12 years (n = 527, 48% boys) completed a questionnaire during class-time which assessed screen-time (ST), fruit and vegetable (FV), and energy-dense (ED) snack consumption using a Food Frequency Questionnaire. Health behaviours were categorised into high and low frequencies based

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2017 BMC Public Health

95. The effect of an online video intervention 'Movie Models' on specific parenting practices and parental self-efficacy related to children's physical activity, screen-time and healthy diet: a quasi experimental study. (PubMed)

The effect of an online video intervention 'Movie Models' on specific parenting practices and parental self-efficacy related to children's physical activity, screen-time and healthy diet: a quasi experimental study. In children, being sufficiently physically active, having low levels of screen-time and having a healthy diet are largely influenced by parenting practices. Children of parents applying positive parenting practices are at lower risk for overweight and obesity. Therefore, we (...) investigated the effect of a health promoting online video intervention for parents ('Movie Models') on children's physical activity (PA), screen-time and healthy diet, and on specific parenting practices and parental self-efficacy related to these parenting practices. The online videos are delivered to parents of primary schoolchildren, and were based on real-life scenarios.A two-armed, quasi experimental design was used. Parents of primary schoolchildren were recruited between November and December 2013

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2017 BMC Public Health

96. Demographic correlates of screen time and objectively measured sedentary time and physical activity among toddlers: a cross-sectional study. (PubMed)

Demographic correlates of screen time and objectively measured sedentary time and physical activity among toddlers: a cross-sectional study. Determining the most important demographic correlates of sedentary behavior and physical activity will help identify the groups of children that are most in need of intervention. Little is known in regards to the demographic correlates of sedentary behavior and physical activity in toddlers (aged 12-35 months), where long-term behavioral patterns may (...) characteristics and toddlers' television viewing, video/computer games, and overall screen time were measured via the PREPS parental questionnaire. Toddlers' objectively measured sedentary time and physical activity (light, moderate to vigorous, and total) were accelerometer-derived using Actigraph wGT3X-BT monitors. Simple and multiple linear regression models were conducted to examine associations.In the multiple linear regression models, toddlers' age, toddlers' sex (female versus male), toddlers' race

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2017 BMC Public Health

97. Direct Measurements of Smartphone Screen-Time: Relationships with Demographics and Sleep. (PubMed)

Direct Measurements of Smartphone Screen-Time: Relationships with Demographics and Sleep. Smartphones are increasingly integrated into everyday life, but frequency of use has not yet been objectively measured and compared to demographics, health information, and in particular, sleep quality.The aim of this study was to characterize smartphone use by measuring screen-time directly, determine factors that are associated with increased screen-time, and to test the hypothesis that increased screen (...) -time is associated with poor sleep.We performed a cross-sectional analysis in a subset of 653 participants enrolled in the Health eHeart Study, an internet-based longitudinal cohort study open to any interested adult (≥ 18 years). Smartphone screen-time (the number of minutes in each hour the screen was on) was measured continuously via smartphone application. For each participant, total and average screen-time were computed over 30-day windows. Average screen-time specifically during self-reported

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2016 PLoS ONE

98. Psychometric Properties of a Scale to Assess Parental Self-Efficacy for Influencing Children's Dietary, Physical Activity, Sedentary, and Screen Time Behaviors in Disadvantaged Areas. (PubMed)

Psychometric Properties of a Scale to Assess Parental Self-Efficacy for Influencing Children's Dietary, Physical Activity, Sedentary, and Screen Time Behaviors in Disadvantaged Areas. According to social cognitive theory, self-efficacy is central to behavior change. Consequently, parental self-efficacy (PSE) for influencing children's dietary, physical activity (PA), sedentary, and screen time behaviors is important for child obesity prevention. The aim of this study was to evaluate (...) the psychometric properties of an instrument to measure PSE regarding these behaviors in disadvantaged areas.Parents ( n = 229) of whom 47% had completed secondary school or less, and who participated in the Healthy School Start trial, responded to a 15-item PSE instrument. Children's diet and screen time were measured through parent reports. PA and sedentary behaviors were measured using accelerometers. Construct validity was assessed using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), criterion validity by correlations

2017 Health Education & Behavior

99. Body mass index trajectories of Indigenous Australian children and relation to screen time, diet, and demographic factors. (PubMed)

Body mass index trajectories of Indigenous Australian children and relation to screen time, diet, and demographic factors. Limited cross-sectional data indicate elevated overweight/obesity prevalence among Indigenous versus non-Indigenous Australian children. This study aims to quantify body mass index (BMI) trajectories among Indigenous Australian children aged 3-6 and 6-9 years and to identify factors associated with the development of overweight/obesity.Three-year BMI change was examined

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2017 Obesity

100. Do the correlates of screen time and sedentary time differ in preschool children? (PubMed)

Do the correlates of screen time and sedentary time differ in preschool children? Preschool children can spend up to 12 h a day in sedentary time and few meet current recommendations for screen time. Little is known about ecological correlates that could be targeted to decrease specific versus total sedentary behaviour. This study examined whether the correlates of screen time and sedentary time differ in preschool boys and girls.Parents participating in the HAPPY Study in 2008/09 in Melbourne (...) , Australia reported their child's usual screen time and potential individual, social and physical environment correlates. Children wore ActiGraph GT1M accelerometers for eight days to objectively assess sedentary time (<100 counts.min-1). Multivariable linear regression analyses were performed, stratified by sex and controlling for child age, preschool/childcare attendance and clustering by centre of recruitment. Correlates significantly associated with screen time or sedentary time in individual models

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2017 BMC Public Health

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