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41. Contrasting Screen-Time and Green-Time: A Case for Using Smart Technology and Nature to Optimize Learning Processes (PubMed)

Contrasting Screen-Time and Green-Time: A Case for Using Smart Technology and Nature to Optimize Learning Processes 29910749 2018 11 14 1664-1078 9 2018 Frontiers in psychology Front Psychol Contrasting Screen-Time and Green-Time: A Case for Using Smart Technology and Nature to Optimize Learning Processes. 773 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00773 Schilhab Theresa S S TSS Future Technology, Culture and Learning, Danish School of Education, University of Aarhus, Copenhagen, Denmark. Stevenson Matt P MP

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2018 Frontiers in psychology

42. Relationship between Physical Activity, Screen Time and Weight Status among Young Adolescents (PubMed)

Relationship between Physical Activity, Screen Time and Weight Status among Young Adolescents It is well established that lack of physical activity and high bouts of sedentary behaviour are now associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between physical activity participation, overall screen time and weight status amongst early Irish adolescent youth. Participants were a sample of 169 students: 113 boys (mean age = 12.89 (...) ± 0.34 years) and 56 girls (mean age = 12.87 ± 0.61 years). The data gathered in the present study included physical activity (accelerometry), screen time (self-report) and anthropometric measurements. Overweight and obese participants accumulated significantly more minutes of overall screen time daily compared to their normal-weight counterparts. A correlation between physical activity and daily television viewing was evident among girls. No significant interaction was apparent when examining daily

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2018 Sports

43. Screen Time, Physical Activity and Self-Esteem in Children: The Ulm Birth Cohort Study (PubMed)

Screen Time, Physical Activity and Self-Esteem in Children: The Ulm Birth Cohort Study Screen time is a central activity of children’s daily life and jeopardizes mental health. However, results appear inconclusive and are often based on small cross-sectional studies. We aimed to investigate the temporal sequence of the association between screen time and self-esteem taking into account further indirect effects through family or friendship relationship. In our population-based birth cohort (...) study (baseline November 2000⁻November 2001, Ulm, Germany), these relationships were explored in n = 519 11- and 13-year-old children and their parents who both provided information on children’s screen time: time spent watching television or videos (TV), time spent on computers, video game consoles, mobile devices, or cell phones; so called “other screen time”, and children’s self-esteem (KINDL-R). Time watching TV (self-reported) at age 11 was negatively associated

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2018 International journal of environmental research and public health

44. Screen time behaviours and caffeine intake in US children: findings from the cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) (PubMed)

Screen time behaviours and caffeine intake in US children: findings from the cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) Screen time (ST) behaviours, for example, television (TV) watching and computer use, among youth are associated with unhealthy eating, and these patterns track over time. A positive association between ST and TV watching with consumption of caffeinated foods and beverages has been described in national samples of children in a few European

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2018 BMJ Paediatrics Open

45. Fit 5 Kids Screen Time Reduction Curriculum for Latino Preschoolers

Fit 5 Kids Screen Time Reduction Curriculum for Latino Preschoolers Fit 5 Kids Screen Time Reduction Curriculum for Latino Preschoolers - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Fit 5 Kids Screen Time (...) Research Center Baylor College of Medicine USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center Information provided by (Responsible Party): Jason Mendoza, MD, MPH, Seattle Children's Hospital Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Childhood obesity and metabolic risk are at record high levels in the US, and Latino children are at very high risk. This project will test an intervention called Fit 5 Kids, designed for Latino preschoolers to decrease their screen time in order to promote physical

2018 Clinical Trials

46. The Effect of Screen Time on Recovery From Concussion

The Effect of Screen Time on Recovery From Concussion The Effect of Screen Time on Recovery From Concussion - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. The Effect of Screen Time on Recovery From (...) by (Responsible Party): Theodore Macnow, University of Massachusetts, Worcester Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: This study will prospectively examine the effect of screen time on recovery from concussion. Patients 12 to 25 years of age presenting to the ED with a concussion will be randomized to allow for screen time as tolerated or to abstain from screen time for the first 48 hours of recovery. The amount of screen time use and duration of concussive symptoms will be assessed through

2018 Clinical Trials

47. Relationship between screen time and nutrient intake in Japanese children and adolescents: a cross-sectional observational study (PubMed)

Relationship between screen time and nutrient intake in Japanese children and adolescents: a cross-sectional observational study Sedentary behaviors have recently become an important public health issue. We aimed to investigate the relationship between screen time and nutrient intake in children and adolescents.The present study was conducted in 2013. Data were collected from children and adolescents aged between 6 and 15 years old in Shika town. Questionnaires were distributed to 1459 subjects (...) , were used to provide parameter estimates (β) and 95% CI for the relationship between screen time and nutrient intake.In boys, longer TV viewing times correlated or tended to correlate with a lower intake of protein, potassium, calcium, iron, vitamin K, vitamin B-2, and total dietary fiber. In girls, longer TV viewing times correlated with a lower intake of protein, sodium, calcium, vitamin D, and vitamin B-2. Longer TV viewing times correlated with a higher intake of n-6 fatty acids in girls. PC

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2018 Environmental health and preventive medicine

48. Physical Activity, Screen Time, and Dietary Intake in Families: A Cluster-Analysis With Mother-Father-Child Triads (PubMed)

Physical Activity, Screen Time, and Dietary Intake in Families: A Cluster-Analysis With Mother-Father-Child Triads Background: The co-occurrence of multiple health behaviors such as physical activity, diet, and sedentary behavior affects individuals' health. Co-occurence of different health behaviors has been shown in a large number of studies. This study extended this perspective by addressing the co-occurrence of multiple health behaviors in multiple persons. The objective was to examine (...) familial health behavioral patterns by (1) identifying clusters of families with similar behavior patterns and (2) characterizing the clusters by analyzing their correlates. Methods: Cross-sectional data were collected from 198 families (mother, father, and child). Mothers, fathers, and children completed questionnaires assessing health related behaviors (physical activity, consumption of "healthy" and "unhealthy" foods, and screen time), the perception of Family Health Climate (regarding physical

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2018 Frontiers in public health

49. Patterns of Screen Time Among Rural Mexican-American Children on the New Mexico-Mexico Border (PubMed)

Patterns of Screen Time Among Rural Mexican-American Children on the New Mexico-Mexico Border The prevalence of obesity is 26% among Hispanic children and teenagers and 47% among Hispanic adults. One contributor to obesity is sedentary behavior, such as using electronic screen devices (ie, screens). Low-income and Hispanic youths spend more time using such devices than other youths.We interviewed 202 parents of Mexican-origin children aged 6 to 10 years in 2 rural communities near the US-Mexico (...) border to determine screen use among children. We tested for associations between covariates and heavy screen use (≥4 hours/day) and calculated adjusted odds ratios (AORs) to identify independent, modifiable risk factors for such use.More than two-thirds (68.3%) of households had an annual income of less than $24,000, 89.1% spoke primarily Spanish, and 92.1% had internet access. The percentage of children with heavy screen use was 14.9% on weekdays and 25.2% on weekends. Smartphones were used by 62.4

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2018 Preventing chronic disease

50. Comparisons in Screen-Time Behaviours among Adolescents with and without Long-Term Illnesses or Disabilities: Results from 2013/14 HBSC Study (PubMed)

Comparisons in Screen-Time Behaviours among Adolescents with and without Long-Term Illnesses or Disabilities: Results from 2013/14 HBSC Study Reducing sedentary behaviours can help prevent non-communicable diseases, particularly among young adolescents with long term illnesses or disabilities (LTID). Much of young people's voluntary sedentary time is related to screen-time behaviours (STBs) such as TV viewing, playing computer games, and using the computer for other activities. Although public

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2018 International journal of environmental research and public health

51. Parental Internet Use and Lifestyle Factors as Correlates of Prolonged Screen Time of Children in Japan: Results From the Super Shokuiku School Project (PubMed)

Parental Internet Use and Lifestyle Factors as Correlates of Prolonged Screen Time of Children in Japan: Results From the Super Shokuiku School Project Prolonged screen time (ST), which includes TV viewing and gaming on smartphones and computers, is linked to poor health. Our aim was to explore the associations between school children with prolonged ST and parental internet use (IU) and lifestyles in Japan.Children aged 6 to 13 years from the Super Shokuiku School Project, were surveyed using (...) setting governing screen time (OR 2.41; 95% CI, 1.63-3.58), and mothers with full-time employment (OR 1.95; 95% CI, 1.06-3.64).Prolonged ST among Japanese children was strongly associated with parental IU, no set rules for ST, and mother's unhealthy lifestyles. To reduce children's ST, parental engagement is warranted in the intervention strategy.

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2018 Journal of Epidemiology

52. Insufficient Sleep Duration Is Associated With Dietary Habits, Screen Time, and Obesity in Children (PubMed)

Insufficient Sleep Duration Is Associated With Dietary Habits, Screen Time, and Obesity in Children To examine sleep duration and the association between insufficient sleep duration and life- style factors in a representative sample of Greek children and adolescents.Population data derived from a school-based health survey carried out in spring 2015 on 177,091 children (51% male) aged 8 to 17 years (participation rate was approximately 40% of the total population). Dietary habits, sleeping (...) with unhealthy dietary habits such as skipping breakfast (odds ratio [OR] 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.25-1.35), fast-food consumption (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.29-1.41), and consuming sweets regularly (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.25-1.39). Insufficient sleep duration was found to be associated with insufficient dietary habits (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.54-0.64), increased screen time (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.21-1.31), and being overweight/obese (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.17-1.25), after adjusting for several covariates.Insufficient sleep

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2018 Journal of clinical sleep medicine : JCSM : official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine

53. Associations between screen time and lower psychological well-being among children and adolescents: Evidence from a population-based study (PubMed)

Associations between screen time and lower psychological well-being among children and adolescents: Evidence from a population-based study Previous research on associations between screen time and psychological well-being among children and adolescents has been conflicting, leading some researchers to question the limits on screen time suggested by physician organizations. We examined a large (n = 40,337) national random sample of 2- to 17-year-old children and adolescents in the U.S. in 2016 (...) that included comprehensive measures of screen time (including cell phones, computers, electronic devices, electronic games, and TV) and an array of psychological well-being measures. After 1 h/day of use, more hours of daily screen time were associated with lower psychological well-being, including less curiosity, lower self-control, more distractibility, more difficulty making friends, less emotional stability, being more difficult to care for, and inability to finish tasks. Among 14- to 17-year-olds

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2018 Preventive medicine reports

54. Digital Screen Time and Pediatric Sleep: Evidence from a Preregistered Cohort Study. (PubMed)

Digital Screen Time and Pediatric Sleep: Evidence from a Preregistered Cohort Study. To determine the extent to which time spent with digital devices predicts meaningful variability in pediatric sleep.Following a preregistered analysis plan, data from a sample of American children (n = 50 212) derived from the 2016 National Survey of Children's Health were analyzed. Models adjusted for child-, caregiver-, household-, and community-level covariates to estimate the potential effects of digital (...) screen use.Each hour devoted to digital screens was associated with 3-8 fewer minutes of nightly sleep and significantly lower levels of sleep consistency. Furthermore, those children who complied with 2010 and 2016 American Academy of Pediatrics guidance on screen time limits reported between 20 and 26 more minutes, respectively, of nightly sleep. However, links between digital screen time and pediatric sleep outcomes were modest, accounting for less than 1.9% of observed variability in sleep

2018 Journal of Pediatrics

55. Exploring how Brazilian immigrant mothers living in the USA obtain information about physical activity and screen time for their preschool-aged children: a qualitative study. (PubMed)

Exploring how Brazilian immigrant mothers living in the USA obtain information about physical activity and screen time for their preschool-aged children: a qualitative study. To explore how Brazilian-born immigrant mothers living in the USA obtain information about physical activity (PA) and screen time (ST) behaviours for their preschool-aged children.Focus group discussions (FGDs) were used to gain an in-depth understanding of research topics. All FGDs were audio-recorded and professionally

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2018 BMJ open

56. Excessive Screen Time and Psychosocial Well-Being: The Mediating Role of Body Mass Index, Sleep Duration, and Parent-Child Interaction. (PubMed)

Excessive Screen Time and Psychosocial Well-Being: The Mediating Role of Body Mass Index, Sleep Duration, and Parent-Child Interaction. To examine the relationship between excessive screen time and psychosocial well-being in preschool children, and the potential mediating role of body mass index, sleep duration, and parent-child interaction.A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Shanghai, China using stratified random sampling design. A representative sample of 20 324 children aged 3-4 years (...) old from 191 kindergartens participated in this study. Parents completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and reported the child's time spent on screen exposure, sleep duration, height, weight, and parent-child interactive activities.Preschool children in Shanghai were exposed to 2.8 (95% CI 2.7, 2.9) hours/day of screen time, with 78.6% (95% CI 77.8,79.3) exceeding 1 hour/day and 53% (95% CI 52.0,53.9) exceeding 2 hours/day. Every additional hour of screen time was associated

2018 Journal of Pediatrics

57. Cross-Sectional Associations of Environmental Perception with Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Screen Time among Older Adults (PubMed)

Cross-Sectional Associations of Environmental Perception with Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Screen Time among Older Adults This study investigated associations of perceived environmental factors with leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and screen time (ST) among older adults. A cross-sectional study was conducted by administering computer-assisted telephone interviews to 1028 older Taiwanese adults in November 2016. Data on personal factors, perceived environmental factors, LTPA, and ST

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2018 Journal of clinical medicine

58. Reducing NAFLD screening time: A comparative study of eight diagnostic methods offering an alternative to ultrasound scans. (PubMed)

Reducing NAFLD screening time: A comparative study of eight diagnostic methods offering an alternative to ultrasound scans. The use of ultrasound scan (US) in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) screening overloads US waiting lists. We hypothesized and tested a hybrid two-step method, consisting of applying a formula, to exclude subjects at low risk, before US.The sample included 2970 males and females (937 with NAFLD) diagnosed by US. We selected eight formulas: Fatty Liver Index (FLI

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2018 Liver International

59. The Longitudinal Impact of Screen Time on Adolescent Development: Moderation by Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia. (PubMed)

The Longitudinal Impact of Screen Time on Adolescent Development: Moderation by Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia. To date, little is known about underlying psychophysiological contributions to the impact of media content and overall screen time on adolescent psychological functioning. In the present study we examine respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) as a moderator of the link between specific types of media content use, overall media exposure, and the development of internalizing and aggressive (...) , but not prosocial, media content. For aggressive content, youth exhibiting RSA withdrawal reported significantly greater internalizing and aggressive symptoms when exposed to higher amounts of screen time and aggressive content.These findings suggest that profiles of heightened RSA withdrawal may place adolescents at greater risk to the negative impact of violent media, whereas prosocial media content may not significantly impact youth development of psychopathology. Implications for the role

2018 The Journal of Adolescent Health

60. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of screen time and physical activity with school performance at different types of secondary school. (PubMed)

Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of screen time and physical activity with school performance at different types of secondary school. Previous studies have already reported associations of media consumption and/or physical activity with school achievement. However, longitudinal studies investigating independent effects of physical activity and media consumption on school performance are sparse. The present study fills this research gap and, furthermore, assesses relationships

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2018 BMC Public Health

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