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41. Musculoskeletal Multisite Pain and Patterns of Association After Adjusting for Sleep, Physical Activity and Screen Time in Adolescents. (Abstract)

Musculoskeletal Multisite Pain and Patterns of Association After Adjusting for Sleep, Physical Activity and Screen Time in Adolescents. Cross-sectional.This study aims to describe how pain at multiple body sites is associated after controlling for other predictive factors such as age, sex, sleeping hours, time spent in physical activity, and time spent in screening based activities in adolescents aged 13 to 19 years.The prevalence of multisite pain in adolescents is high, but studies (...) , sleep and screen time, most of the previous associations remain significant (OR between 1.50 and 3.07, P < 0.05).This study's results seem to suggest that pain at one body site is more important in determining multiple painful body sites than demographic or lifestyle factors. Longitudinal studies exploring the association and chronology of multisite pain are needed.3.

2018 Spine

42. Excessive Screen Time and Psychosocial Well-Being: The Mediating Role of Body Mass Index, Sleep Duration, and Parent-Child Interaction. (Abstract)

Excessive Screen Time and Psychosocial Well-Being: The Mediating Role of Body Mass Index, Sleep Duration, and Parent-Child Interaction. To examine the relationship between excessive screen time and psychosocial well-being in preschool children, and the potential mediating role of body mass index, sleep duration, and parent-child interaction.A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Shanghai, China using stratified random sampling design. A representative sample of 20 324 children aged 3-4 years (...) old from 191 kindergartens participated in this study. Parents completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and reported the child's time spent on screen exposure, sleep duration, height, weight, and parent-child interactive activities.Preschool children in Shanghai were exposed to 2.8 (95% CI 2.7, 2.9) hours/day of screen time, with 78.6% (95% CI 77.8,79.3) exceeding 1 hour/day and 53% (95% CI 52.0,53.9) exceeding 2 hours/day. Every additional hour of screen time was associated

2018 Journal of Pediatrics

43. Exploring how Brazilian immigrant mothers living in the USA obtain information about physical activity and screen time for their preschool-aged children: a qualitative study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Exploring how Brazilian immigrant mothers living in the USA obtain information about physical activity and screen time for their preschool-aged children: a qualitative study. To explore how Brazilian-born immigrant mothers living in the USA obtain information about physical activity (PA) and screen time (ST) behaviours for their preschool-aged children.Focus group discussions (FGDs) were used to gain an in-depth understanding of research topics. All FGDs were audio-recorded and professionally

2018 BMJ open

44. Associations of discretionary screen time with mortality, cardiovascular disease and cancer are attenuated by strength, fitness and physical activity: findings from the UK Biobank study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Associations of discretionary screen time with mortality, cardiovascular disease and cancer are attenuated by strength, fitness and physical activity: findings from the UK Biobank study. Discretionary screen time (time spent viewing a television or computer screen during leisure time) is an important contributor to total sedentary behaviour, which is associated with increased risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study was to determine whether the associations (...) of screen time with cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality were modified by levels of cardiorespiratory fitness, grip strength or physical activity.In total, 390,089 participants (54% women) from the UK Biobank were included in this study. All-cause mortality, CVD and cancer incidence and mortality were the main outcomes. Discretionary television (TV) viewing, personal computer (PC) screen time and overall screen time (TV + PC time) were the exposure variables. Grip strength, fitness

2018 BMC Medicine

45. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of screen time and physical activity with school performance at different types of secondary school. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of screen time and physical activity with school performance at different types of secondary school. Previous studies have already reported associations of media consumption and/or physical activity with school achievement. However, longitudinal studies investigating independent effects of physical activity and media consumption on school performance are sparse. The present study fills this research gap and, furthermore, assesses relationships

2018 BMC Public Health

46. An instrumental variables approach to assess the effect of class size reduction on student screen time. (Abstract)

An instrumental variables approach to assess the effect of class size reduction on student screen time. An emerging area of research considers links between characteristics of the school setting and health. The existing small evidence base assessing the association between class size and health is inconclusive. This quasi-experimental study uses an instrumental variables approach based on North Carolina's elementary class size reduction policy to assess the relationship between class size (...) and student screen time. Specifically, data are from public school students in North Carolina, USA, who were in 3rd grade any time between fall 2005 and spring 2011. There was no association between class size and screen time (measured as recreational television and/or electronic device use), after accounting for grade size and school size, year fixed effects, and clustering at the school and district level. These findings suggest that, in statewide policy implementation settings, there may not be any

2018 Social Science & Medicine

47. Correlates of screen time among 8-19-year-old students in China. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Correlates of screen time among 8-19-year-old students in China. Previous studies have shown that prolonged time spent on screen-based sedentary behavior was significantly associated with lower health status in children, independent of physical activity levels. The study aimed to explore the individual and environmental correlates of screen time (ST) among 8-19-year-old students in China.The study surveyed ST using a self-administered questionnaire in Chinese students aged 8-19 years; 1063

2018 BMC Public Health

48. Mothers' and father's perceptions of the risks and benefits of screen time and physical activity during early childhood: a qualitative study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Mothers' and father's perceptions of the risks and benefits of screen time and physical activity during early childhood: a qualitative study. This study sought to explore mothers' and fathers' perceptions of the risks and benefits of screen time and active play during early childhood.In-depth semi structured telephone interviews were conducted with mothers and fathers (n = 28) of children aged 3-5 years who had earlier taken part in a larger quantitative study in Australia and identified (...) perceptions of screen time, with benefits such as learning, education and relaxation, and risks including habit formation, inappropriate content, negative cognitive and social outcome, and detriments to health being reported. A few differences between mothers' and fathers' perceptions were evident.This study identified that some parental perceptions of benefits and risks of screen time and active play were consistent with published evidence, while others were contradicted by current evidence. Future

2018 BMC Public Health

49. Digital Screen Time and Pediatric Sleep: Evidence from a Preregistered Cohort Study. (Abstract)

Digital Screen Time and Pediatric Sleep: Evidence from a Preregistered Cohort Study. To determine the extent to which time spent with digital devices predicts meaningful variability in pediatric sleep.Following a preregistered analysis plan, data from a sample of American children (n = 50 212) derived from the 2016 National Survey of Children's Health were analyzed. Models adjusted for child-, caregiver-, household-, and community-level covariates to estimate the potential effects of digital (...) screen use.Each hour devoted to digital screens was associated with 3-8 fewer minutes of nightly sleep and significantly lower levels of sleep consistency. Furthermore, those children who complied with 2010 and 2016 American Academy of Pediatrics guidance on screen time limits reported between 20 and 26 more minutes, respectively, of nightly sleep. However, links between digital screen time and pediatric sleep outcomes were modest, accounting for less than 1.9% of observed variability in sleep

2018 Journal of Pediatrics

50. Cross-sectional and prospective associations of neighbourhood environmental attributes with screen time in Japanese middle-aged and older adults. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cross-sectional and prospective associations of neighbourhood environmental attributes with screen time in Japanese middle-aged and older adults. This study examined cross-sectional and 2-year prospective associations of perceived and objectively measured environmental attributes with screen time among middle-aged Japanese adults.Prospective cohort study.Nerima and Kanuma cities of Japan.Data were collected from adults aged 40-69 years living in two cities of Japan in 2011 (baseline: n=1011 (...) ; 55.3±8.4 years) and again in 2013 (follow-up: n=533; 52.7% of baseline sample).The exposure variables were five geographic information system-based and perceived attributes of neighbourhood environments (residential density, access to shops and public transport, footpaths, street connectivity), respectively. The outcome variables were baseline screen time (television viewing time and leisure-time internet use) and its change over 2 years. Multilevel generalised linear modelling was used.On average

2018 BMJ open

51. Relationship of Parental and Adolescents' Screen Time to Self-Rated Health: A Structural Equation Modeling. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Relationship of Parental and Adolescents' Screen Time to Self-Rated Health: A Structural Equation Modeling. To investigate the association of parental and adolescents' screen time with self-rated health and to examine the mediating effects of psychosocial factors (social relationships and distress) on this association.A cross-sectional study was conducted among 984 Brazilian adolescents (10- to 17-year-olds). Self-rated health, screen time (adolescents and parental), and perception of social (...) relationships and distress were evaluated through self-report questionnaires. Structural equation modeling was adopted to investigate the pathways of the relationship between adolescents' screen time and self-rated health.Adolescents' screen time was directly and negatively related to self-rated health only in boys ( r = -0.158, p = .015). In girls, screen time was related to self-rated health through distress ( r = -0.188, p = .007) and social relationships ( r = 0.176, p = .008). The models fit

2018 Health Education & Behavior

52. The Effect of Screen Time on Recovery From Concussion

The Effect of Screen Time on Recovery From Concussion The Effect of Screen Time on Recovery From Concussion - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. The Effect of Screen Time on Recovery From (...) by (Responsible Party): Theodore Macnow, University of Massachusetts, Worcester Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: This study will prospectively examine the effect of screen time on recovery from concussion. Patients 12 to 25 years of age presenting to the ED with a concussion will be randomized to allow for screen time as tolerated or to abstain from screen time for the first 48 hours of recovery. The amount of screen time use and duration of concussive symptoms will be assessed through

2018 Clinical Trials

53. Fit 5 Kids Screen Time Reduction Curriculum for Latino Preschoolers

Fit 5 Kids Screen Time Reduction Curriculum for Latino Preschoolers Fit 5 Kids Screen Time Reduction Curriculum for Latino Preschoolers - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Fit 5 Kids Screen Time (...) Research Center Baylor College of Medicine USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center Information provided by (Responsible Party): Jason Mendoza, MD, MPH, Seattle Children's Hospital Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Childhood obesity and metabolic risk are at record high levels in the US, and Latino children are at very high risk. This project will test an intervention called Fit 5 Kids, designed for Latino preschoolers to decrease their screen time in order to promote physical

2018 Clinical Trials

54. Screen time and young children: Promoting health and development in a digital world Full Text available with Trip Pro

Screen time and young children: Promoting health and development in a digital world [This corrects the article DOI: 10.1093/pch/pxx123.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1093/pch/pxx123.].

2018 Paediatrics & child health

55. Role of parental and environmental characteristics in toddlers’ physical activity and screen time: Bayesian analysis of structural equation models Full Text available with Trip Pro

Role of parental and environmental characteristics in toddlers’ physical activity and screen time: Bayesian analysis of structural equation models Guided by the Socialization Model of Child Behavior (SMCB), this cross-sectional study examined direct and indirect associations of parental cognitions and behavior, the home and neighborhood environment, and toddlers' personal attributes with toddlers' physical activity and screen time.Participants included 193 toddlers (1.6 ± 0.2 years) from (...) the Parents' Role in Establishing healthy Physical activity and Sedentary behavior habits (PREPS) project. Toddlers' screen time and personal attributes, physical activity- or screen time-specific parental cognitions and behaviors, and the home and neighborhood environment were measured via parental-report using the PREPS questionnaire. Accelerometry-measured physical activity was available in 123 toddlers. Bayesian estimation in structural equation modeling (SEM) using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo

2018 The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity

56. INSIGHT responsive parenting intervention reduces infant’s screen time and television exposure Full Text available with Trip Pro

INSIGHT responsive parenting intervention reduces infant’s screen time and television exposure Sedentary behaviors, including screen time, in childhood have been associated with an increased risk for overweight. Beginning in infancy, we sought to reduce screen time and television exposure and increase time spent in interactive play as one component of a responsive parenting (RP) intervention designed for obesity prevention.The Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories (...) (INSIGHT) study is a randomized trial comparing a RP intervention with a safety control intervention. Primiparous mother-newborn dyads (N = 279) were randomized after childbirth. Research nurses delivered intervention content at infant ages 3, 16, 28, and 40 weeks and research center visits at 1 and 2 years. As one component of INSIGHT, developmentally appropriate messages on minimizing screen time, reducing television exposure in the home, and promoting parent-child engagement through interactive play

2018 The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity Controlled trial quality: uncertain

57. Cross-Sectional Associations of Environmental Perception with Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Screen Time among Older Adults Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cross-Sectional Associations of Environmental Perception with Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Screen Time among Older Adults This study investigated associations of perceived environmental factors with leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and screen time (ST) among older adults. A cross-sectional study was conducted by administering computer-assisted telephone interviews to 1028 older Taiwanese adults in November 2016. Data on personal factors, perceived environmental factors, LTPA, and ST

2018 Journal of clinical medicine

58. Prevalence of high screen time and associated factors among students: a cross-sectional study in Zhejiang, China. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Prevalence of high screen time and associated factors among students: a cross-sectional study in Zhejiang, China. To investigate the prevalence and correlates of high screen time (ST) among students in Zhejiang, China.Cross-sectional study.School-based adolescent health survey in Zhejiang Province, China.23 543 students in grades 7-12 from 442 different schools.High ST.The mean age of the students was 15.6 years and 49.7% of them were girls. The prevalence of high ST (screen viewing ≥2 hours

2018 BMJ open

59. Clustering and correlates of screen-time and eating behaviours among young children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Clustering and correlates of screen-time and eating behaviours among young children. Screen-time and unhealthy dietary behaviours are highly pervasive in young children and evidence suggests that these behaviours often co-occur and are associated. Identifying clusters of unhealthy behaviours, and their influences early in childhood, can assist in the development of targeted preventive interventions. The purpose of this study was to examine the sociodemographic, behavioural, and home physical (...) environmental correlates of co-occurring screen-time and unhealthy eating behaviours and to assess the clustering of screen-time and unhealthy dietary behaviours in young children.Parents of 126 children, from the UK, aged 5-6 years (49% boys) completed a questionnaire which assessed their child's screen-time (ST), fruit and vegetable (FV), and energy-dense (ED) snack consumption. Categories of health behaviours were created based on frequencies of children meeting recommendations for FV and ST and median

2018 BMC Public Health

60. Cross-sectional and prospective associations between sleep, screen time, active school travel, sports/exercise participation and physical activity in children and adolescents. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cross-sectional and prospective associations between sleep, screen time, active school travel, sports/exercise participation and physical activity in children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to investigate how sleep, screen time, active school travel and sport and/or exercise participation associates with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in nationally representative samples of Norwegian 9- and 15-y-olds, and whether these four behaviors at age nine predict change in MVPA (...) association between screen time and MVPA among 9- (- 2.2 min/d (95% CI: -3.1, - 1.3)) and 15-y-olds (- 1.7 min/d (95% CI: -2.7, - 0.8)). Compared to their peers with 0-5 min/d of active travel to school, 9- and 15-y-olds with ≥16 min/d accumulated 7.2 (95% CI: 4.0, 10.4) and 9.0 (95% CI: 3.8, 14.1) more min/d of MVPA, respectively. Nine-y-old boys and 15-y-olds reporting ≥8 h/week of sports and/or exercise participation accumulated 14.7 (95% CI: 8.2, 21.3) and 17.9 (95% CI: 14.0, 21.8) more min/d of MVPA

2018 BMC Public Health

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