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181. Physical Activity and Screen-Time Regulations in Childcare Centers

Physical Activity and Screen-Time Regulations in Childcare Centers Physical Activity and Screen-Time Regulations in Childcare Centers - Aim 3 - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Physical (...) Activity and Screen-Time Regulations in Childcare Centers - Aim 3 (Pause and Play) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02751775 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : April 26, 2016 Last Update Posted : March 6, 2018 Sponsor: Pennington Biomedical Research Center Collaborator

2016 Clinical Trials

182. International Trends in Adolescent Screen-Time Behaviors From 2002 to 2010. (PubMed)

International Trends in Adolescent Screen-Time Behaviors From 2002 to 2010. Engaging in prolonged screen-time behaviors (STBs) is detrimental for health. The objective of the present analyses was to examine temporal trends in TV viewing and computer use among adolescents across 30 countries.Data were derived from the cross-national Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study. Data on TV viewing and computer use for gaming and nongaming purposes were collected in 2002 (n = 139,725 [51.4

2016 The Journal of Adolescent Health

183. Influence of Adiposity, Physical Activity, Fitness, and Screen Time on Insulin Dynamics Over 2 Years in Children. (PubMed)

Influence of Adiposity, Physical Activity, Fitness, and Screen Time on Insulin Dynamics Over 2 Years in Children. Despite extensive evidence showing that lifestyle habits play a critical role in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in adults, little is known regarding the impact of lifestyle habits on type 2 diabetes risk in childhood.To assess whether adiposity, fitness, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, and screen time predict insulin sensitivity or insulin secretion (...) absorptiometry, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity using accelerometry, and screen time by average daily hours of self-reported television, video game, or computer use. Regression models were adjusted for age, sex, season, and pubertal stage. The current analysis was completed in October 2015.Insulin sensitivity was measured by the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance and an oral glucose tolerance test-based index (Matsuda insulin sensitivity index). Insulin secretion was measured using

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2016 JAMA pediatrics

184. The impact of different types of parental support behaviours on child physical activity, healthy eating, and screen time: a cross-sectional study. (PubMed)

The impact of different types of parental support behaviours on child physical activity, healthy eating, and screen time: a cross-sectional study. In Canada, 31.5 % of children are overweight or obese, putting them at an increased risk of chronic co-morbidities and premature mortality. Physical activity, healthy eating, and screen time are important behavioural determinants of childhood overweight and obesity that are influenced by the family environment, and particularly parents' support

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2016 BMC Public Health

185. Weekday-weekend patterns of physical activity and screen time in parents and their pre-schoolers. (PubMed)

Weekday-weekend patterns of physical activity and screen time in parents and their pre-schoolers. This study focuses on the comparison of weekday/weekend parent-child behavioural patterns (step count (SC) and screen time (ST)) and answers the question of whether achieving the recommendations for daily SC (10,000) in parents also helps their preschool children achieve the recommended daily SC (11,500).The participants (278 parents aged 30-45 and their 194 children aged 4-7) were randomly

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2016 BMC Public Health

186. Mobility Status as a Predictor of Obesity, Physical Activity, and Screen Time Use among Children Aged 5-11 Years in the United States. (PubMed)

Mobility Status as a Predictor of Obesity, Physical Activity, and Screen Time Use among Children Aged 5-11 Years in the United States. To examine physical activity participation, screen time habits, and the prevalence of overweight/obesity among children in the general population with mobility limitations and those enrolled in special education services.An observational, cross-sectional analysis of the 2011-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a representative sample of the US (...) population. Mobility limitations, special education services utilization, proxy-reported physical activity and screen time, and overweight/obesity status were assessed in children aged 5-11 years.Boys with mobility limitations were less likely to meet physical activity guidelines (≥60 minutes daily) compared with those with no limitations (58.1% vs 74.4%, adjusted F = 4.61, P = .04). In a logistic regression model, boys with mobility limitations had significantly lower odds (0.42, 95% CI 0.20-0.86

2016 Journal of Pediatrics

187. The effect of interventions targeting screen time reduction: A systematic review and meta-analysis. (PubMed)

The effect of interventions targeting screen time reduction: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Previous studies have evaluated the effectiveness of interventions aimed at screen time reduction, but the results have been inconsistent. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to summarize the accumulating evidence of the impact of interventions targeting screen time reduction on body mass index (BMI) reduction and screen time (...) reduction. The PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) databases were searched for RCTs on the effect of interventions targeting screen time reduction. The primary and secondary outcomes were the mean difference between the treatment and control groups in the changes in BMI and changes in screen viewing time. A random effects model was used to calculate the pooled mean differences. Fourteen trials including 2238 participants were assessed. The pooled analysis

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2016 Medicine

188. Parent–child associations for changes in diet, screen time, and physical activity across two decades in modernizing China: China Health and Nutrition Survey 1991–2009 (PubMed)

Parent–child associations for changes in diet, screen time, and physical activity across two decades in modernizing China: China Health and Nutrition Survey 1991–2009 While the household context is important for lifestyle behavior interventions, few studies have examined parent-child associations for diet and physical activity (PA) changes over time in a rapidly urbanizing country. We aimed to investigate changes in diet, screen time, and PA behaviors over time in children and their parents (...) living in the same household, and examine the parent-child association for these behaviors.We studied dietary, screen time, and PA behaviors in 5,201 parent-child pairs (children aged 7-17y) using longitudinal data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (1991, 1993, 1997, 2000, 2004, 2006, and 2009). We collected three-day 24-h recall diet data to generate percentages of energy from animal-source foods, away-from-home eating, and snacking from 1991-2009, which are known urbanization-related

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2016 The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity

189. Evaluation of screen time activities and their relationship with physical activity, overweight and socioeconomic status in children 10-12 years of age in Sanandaj, Iran: A cross-sectional study in 2015 (PubMed)

Evaluation of screen time activities and their relationship with physical activity, overweight and socioeconomic status in children 10-12 years of age in Sanandaj, Iran: A cross-sectional study in 2015 Background: Screen time (ST), including watching television and playing electronic games are the leading cause of a growing obesity epidemic. This study aimed to evaluate ST and its association with physical activity, overweight and socioeconomic status (SES) in children 10 to 12 years of age

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2016 Medical journal of the Islamic Republic of Iran

190. Informing Active Play and Screen Time Behaviour Change Interventions for Low Socioeconomic Position Mothers of Young Children: What Do Mothers Want? (PubMed)

Informing Active Play and Screen Time Behaviour Change Interventions for Low Socioeconomic Position Mothers of Young Children: What Do Mothers Want? Introduction. This study investigated views of mothers from disadvantaged urban and regional areas (i.e., beyond major capital cities) as potential end users of child active play and screen time behaviour change interventions, with a focus on text messaging and web-based delivery platforms. Methods. Thirty-two mothers (22 urban; 10 regional) were (...) interviewed. Purpose-designed questions covered topics regarding mothers' preferences for accessing and receiving information related to parenting and child active play and screen time. Data from transcribed interviews were analysed to identify responses and key themes. Results. Mothers reported frequently accessing parenting- and child-related information online. Regional mothers reported seeking information by talking with other people less frequently than urban mothers and seemed to have a stronger

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2016 BioMed research international

191. Screening Retinopathy of Prematurity in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants in China and the Need for Earlier Screening Times (PubMed)

Screening Retinopathy of Prematurity in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants in China and the Need for Earlier Screening Times Purpose. To convey the need for a revised screening strategy for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) for extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants in China. Design. A retrospective longitudinal study. Methods. The medical charts of infants with a birth weight (BW) of less than 1 kg were reviewed. The infants were divided into three groups: group A, without ROP; group B

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2016 Journal of ophthalmology

192. Cardiovascular Endurance, Body Mass Index, Physical Activity, Screen Time, and Carotenoid Intake of Children: NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey (PubMed)

Cardiovascular Endurance, Body Mass Index, Physical Activity, Screen Time, and Carotenoid Intake of Children: NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey Background. Approximately 17% of children aged 6-11 years were classified as obese in the United States. Obesity adversely affects physical functioning and leads to reduced quality of life. Heart function for overweight and obese children has not been reported. Methods. Data for this study were from NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey (NNYFS

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2016 Journal of obesity

193. Screen time of infants in Sydney, Australia: a birth cohort study. (PubMed)

Screen time of infants in Sydney, Australia: a birth cohort study. To determine the amount of daily screen time in children 18 months of age and ascertain correlations that may be contributing to excessive screen use.A birth cohort was followed with telephone interviews at 6, 12 and 18 months of age. Information about screen time was collected at 18 months.Parents were recruited from postnatal wards of 2 major public hospitals and at home visits conducted for new mothers within 4 weeks of birth (...) in South Western Sydney (SWS).Parents of 500 children with infants 18 months of age residing in SWS.Screen time in infants 18 months of age and associated correlations.A large percentage of children 18 months of age (40%) had screen times >2 hours daily. There were significant associations between more than 2 hours of screen time daily and mothers without a partner (OR 4.32 (95% CI 1.67 to 11.15)); having <3 siblings (no siblings: OR 2.44 (95% CI 1.20 to 4.94); 1-2 siblings: OR 2.08 (95% CI 1.06

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2016 BMJ open

194. Does home equipment contribute to socioeconomic gradients in Australian children's physical activity, sedentary time and screen time? (PubMed)

Does home equipment contribute to socioeconomic gradients in Australian children's physical activity, sedentary time and screen time? Activity behaviours (physical activity, sedentary time and screen time) have been linked to health outcomes in childhood. Furthermore, socioeconomic disparities have been observed in both children's activity behaviours and health outcomes. Children's physical home environments may play a role in these relationships. This study aimed to examine the associations (...) structure) were determined by parental questionnaire. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary time were measured objectively by 7-day 24-h accelerometry. Screen time was obtained from child survey. The associations between the physical home environment, socioeconomic status and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, sedentary time and screen time were examined for 427 children, using analysis of covariance, and linear and logistic regression, with adjustment for gender and family

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2016 BMC Public Health

195. Twelve weeks of dance exergaming in overweight and obese adolescent girls: Transfer effects on physical activity, screen time, and self-efficacy (PubMed)

Twelve weeks of dance exergaming in overweight and obese adolescent girls: Transfer effects on physical activity, screen time, and self-efficacy Given the low levels of physical activity (PA) among adolescent girls in the US, there is a need to identify tools to motivate increased PA. Although there is limited evidence that adolescents transfer PA from one context to another context, exergames (i.e., video games that require gross motor activity) may act as a gateway to promote overall PA (...) outside of game play. The purpose of this study was to examine potential transfer effects (i.e., influences on external behaviors and psychological constructs) of a 12-week exergaming intervention on adolescent girls' PA, screen-time, and self-efficacy towards PA, as well as the intrinsic motivation of exergaming.Participants were 37 girls aged 14-18 years (65% African American, 35% White) who were overweight or obese (body mass index ≥ 85th percentile) and were recruited from the community via school

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2016 Journal of sport and health science Controlled trial quality: uncertain

196. Lifestyle Intervention Effects on the Frequency and Duration of Daily Moderate-Vigorous Physical Activity and Leisure Screen Time. (PubMed)

Lifestyle Intervention Effects on the Frequency and Duration of Daily Moderate-Vigorous Physical Activity and Leisure Screen Time. How a healthy lifestyle intervention changes the frequency and duration of daily moderate-vigorous physical activity and sedentary behavior has not been well characterized. Secondary analyses of data from the Make Better Choices randomized controlled trial were conducted to evaluate how interventions to increase physical activity or reduce leisure screen time (...) affected the frequency and duration of these behaviors during treatment initiation and follow-up.Participants were 202 adults who exhibited insufficient physical activity, excessive screen time and poor diet during a 14-day baseline screening period. The design was a randomized controlled trial with a 3-week intervention period followed by eight 3- to 7-day bursts of data collection over the 6-month follow-up period after intervention termination. Participants self-reported on their physical activity

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2016 Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association Controlled trial quality: uncertain

197. Mediators of change in screen-time in a school-based intervention for adolescent boys: findings from the ATLAS cluster randomized controlled trial. (PubMed)

Mediators of change in screen-time in a school-based intervention for adolescent boys: findings from the ATLAS cluster randomized controlled trial. The mechanisms of behavior change in youth screen-time interventions are poorly understood. Participants were 361 adolescent boys (12-14 years) participating in the ATLAS obesity prevention trial, evaluated in 14 schools in low-income areas of New South Wales, Australia. Recreational screen-time was assessed at baseline, 8- and 18-months, whereas (...) potential mediators (i.e., motivation to limit screen-time and parental rules) were assessed at baseline, 4- and 18-months. Multi-level mediation analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle and were conducted using a product-of-coefficients test. The intervention had a significant impact on screen-time at both time-points, and on autonomous motivation at 18-months. Changes in autonomous motivation partially mediated the effect on screen-time at 18-months in single and multi-mediator models [AB

2016 Journal of behavioral medicine Controlled trial quality: uncertain

198. Intervention to reduce recreational screen-time in adolescents: Outcomes and mediators from the 'switch-off 4 healthy minds' (S4HM) cluster randomized controlled trial. (PubMed)

Intervention to reduce recreational screen-time in adolescents: Outcomes and mediators from the 'switch-off 4 healthy minds' (S4HM) cluster randomized controlled trial. The primary objective was to evaluate the impact of the 'Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds' (S4HM) intervention on recreational screen-time in adolescents.Cluster randomized controlled trial with study measures at baseline and 6-months (post-intervention). Eligible participants reported exceeding recreational screen-time (...) recommendations (i.e., >2h/day). In total, 322 adolescents (mean age=14.4±0.6years) from eight secondary schools in New South Wales, Australia were recruited. The S4HM intervention was guided by Self-Determination Theory and included: an interactive seminar, eHealth messaging, a behavioral contract and parental newsletters. The primary outcome was recreational screen-time. Secondary outcomes included mental health (i.e., well-being, psychological distress, self-perceptions), objectively measured physical

2016 Preventive Medicine Controlled trial quality: uncertain

199. Screen Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH): process evaluation of a randomised controlled trial intervention. (PubMed)

Screen Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH): process evaluation of a randomised controlled trial intervention. The Screen Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH) trial tested a family intervention to reduce screen-based sedentary behaviour in overweight children. The trial found no significant effect of the intervention on children's screen-based sedentary behaviour. To explore these null findings, we conducted a pre-planned process (...) evaluation, focussing on intervention delivery and uptake.SWITCH was a randomised controlled trial of a 6-month family intervention to reduce screen time in overweight children aged 9-12 years (n = 251). Community workers met with each child's primary caregiver to deliver the intervention content. Community workers underwent standard training and were monitored once by a member of the research team to assess intervention delivery. The primary caregiver implemented the intervention with their child

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2016 BMC public health Controlled trial quality: uncertain

200. Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening Using a Quality Improvement Approach in a Nurse-Managed Primary Care Clinic. (PubMed)

Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening Using a Quality Improvement Approach in a Nurse-Managed Primary Care Clinic. According to the American Cancer Society, 1 in 23 Americans will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC) in their lifetime. Screening for CRC is an effective, yet underused preventive approach. This is especially true in rural areas, where only 35% of patients were found to be up to date on their screenings in 2014. Increasing CRC screening can produce positive patient outcomes

2017 Journal for Healthcare Quality

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