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1. Screen time and young children: Promoting health and development in a digital world

Screen time and young children: Promoting health and development in a digital world The digital landscape is evolving more quickly than research on the effects of screen media on the development, learning and family life of young children. This statement examines the potential benefits and risks of screen media in children younger than 5 years, focusing on developmental, psychosocial and physical health. Evidence-based guidance to optimize and support children’s early media experiences involves (...) four principles: minimizing, mitigating, mindfully using and modelling healthy use of screens. Knowing how young children learn and develop informs best practice strategies for health care providers. Keywords: Development; Digital media; Health; Infant; Preschool child; Screen time    

2017 Canadian Paediatric Society

2. Screen time and young children: Promoting health and development in a digital world

Screen time and young children: Promoting health and development in a digital world The digital landscape is evolving more quickly than research on the effects of screen media on the development, learning and family life of young children. This statement examines the potential benefits and risks of screen media in children younger than 5 years, focusing on developmental, psychosocial and physical health. Evidence-based guidance to optimize and support children’s early media experiences involves (...) four principles: minimizing, mitigating, mindfully using and modelling healthy use of screens. Knowing how young children learn and develop informs best practice strategies for health care providers. Keywords: Development; Digital media; Health; Infant; Preschool child; Screen time    

2017 Canadian Paediatric Society

3. Digital media: Promoting healthy screen use in school-aged children and adolescents

and families involves four principles: healthy management , meaningful screen use, positive modelling , and balanced, informed monitoring of screen time and behaviours.  Keywords: Adolescents; Children; Development; Digital media; Family; Health; Screen use (...) Digital media: Promoting healthy screen use in school-aged children and adolescents Digital media are integrated into the everyday lives of children and adolescents, with potential benefits and risks for learning, mental and physical health, and for social life. This statement examines the cognitive, psychosocial, and physical effects of digital media on school-aged children and adolescents, with a focus on family routines, context, and activities. Evidence-based guidance for clinicians

2019 Canadian Paediatric Society

4. What mums think matters: A mediating model of maternal perceptions of the impact of screen time on preschoolers' actual screen time Full Text available with Trip Pro

What mums think matters: A mediating model of maternal perceptions of the impact of screen time on preschoolers' actual screen time Screen time during the preschool years is detrimental to wellbeing. The impact of parental perceptions on preschoolers' screen time is unknown. This paper explores the association between maternal perceptions of the impact of screen time on their preschoolers' wellbeing with their child's screen time and the potential mediating role of their perception (...) of the appropriate amount of screen time. In 2013-2014, mothers of 575 preschoolers (2-5 years; metropolitan Melbourne and online sources) reported: their perceptions of the impact of screen time on 11 aspects of wellbeing, conceptually grouped to physical, social and cognitive well-being; their perceptions of the appropriate amount of screen time for preschoolers; and their child's actual screen time. Regression analyses investigated associations between perceptions and children's screen time. Mediation

2017 Preventive medicine reports

5. Screen-time is associated with inattention problems in preschoolers: Results from the CHILD birth cohort study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Screen-time is associated with inattention problems in preschoolers: Results from the CHILD birth cohort study. Pre-school children spend an average of two-hours daily using screens. We examined associations between screen-time on pre-school behavior using data from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) study.CHILD participant parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) at five-years of age. Parents reported their child's total screen-time including gaming (...) and mobile devices. Screen-time was categorized using the recommended threshold of two-hours/day for five-years or one-hour/day for three-years. Multiple linear regression examined associations between screen-time and externalizing behavior (e.g. inattention and aggression). Multiple logistic regression identified characteristics of children at risk for clinically significant externalizing problems (CBCL T-score≥65).Screen-time was available for over 95% of children (2,322/2,427) with CBCL data. Mean

2019 PLoS ONE

6. What behaviour change techniques are associated with effective interventions to reduce screen time in 0-5 year olds? A systematic review

What behaviour change techniques are associated with effective interventions to reduce screen time in 0-5 year olds? A systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration

2019 PROSPERO

7. Measurement of screen time among preschool-aged children: a systematic review

Measurement of screen time among preschool-aged children: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email

2019 PROSPERO

8. Levels of habitual 24-hour movement behaviours (time spent in physical activity, sedentary behaviour including screen time, and sleep) among 3-4 year olds in sub-Saharan Africa

Levels of habitual 24-hour movement behaviours (time spent in physical activity, sedentary behaviour including screen time, and sleep) among 3-4 year olds in sub-Saharan Africa Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability

2019 PROSPERO

9. Cross sectional associations of screen time and outdoor play with social skills in preschool children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cross sectional associations of screen time and outdoor play with social skills in preschool children. Screen time and physical activity behaviours develop during the crucial early childhood period (0-5 years) and impact multiple health and developmental outcomes, including psychosocial wellbeing. Social skills, one component of psychosocial wellbeing, are vital for children's school readiness and future mental health. This study investigates potential associations of screen time and outdoor (...) play (as a proxy for physical activity) with social skills. Cross sectional data were available for 575 mothers with a child (54% boys) aged 2-5 years. Mothers reported their child's screen time, outdoor play time and social skills (Adaptive Social Behavior Inventory; ASBI). Multiple linear regression analyses assessed associations of screen and outdoor play time (Model 1) and compliance with screen time and physical activity recommendations (Model 2) with three ASBI subscales. Boys and girls spent

2018 PLoS ONE

10. Less screen time and more frequent vigorous physical activity is associated with lower risk of reporting negative mental health symptoms among Icelandic adolescents. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Less screen time and more frequent vigorous physical activity is associated with lower risk of reporting negative mental health symptoms among Icelandic adolescents. Few studies have explored the potential interrelated associations of screen time and physical activity with mental health in youth, particularly using objective methods. We examined cross-sectional associations of these variables among Icelandic adolescents, using objective and subjective measurements of physical activity.Data were (...) collected in the spring of 2015 from 315 tenth grade students (mean age 15.8 years) in six elementary schools in metropolitan Reykjavík, Iceland. Participants reported, via questionnaire, on demographics, weekly frequency of vigorous physical activity, daily hours of screen time and mental health status (symptoms of depression, anxiety and somatic complaints, self-esteem and life satisfaction). Total physical activity was measured over one week with wrist-worn accelerometers. Body composition

2018 PLoS ONE

11. A systematic review of the association between screen time and sleep in school-aged children and adolescents

A systematic review of the association between screen time and sleep in school-aged children and adolescents Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files

2019 PROSPERO

12. Obesity: Behavioral Interventions that Aim to Reduce Recreational Sedentary Screen Time Among Children

, behavioral sciences, and nursing and allied health. The types of documents retrieved by the search included journal articles, books, book chapters, reports, and conference papers. Following are search strategies specific for Medline. Search terms and search strategies were adjusted to each database, based on controlled and uncontrolled vocabularies and search software. Medline (OVID) ("screen time" or "screen use" or "screen usage").tw. television/ video games/ (vcr or dvd$).tw. ((television or tv) adj (...) : 20 Search Strategy: ((tv or television or videogame* or video game or dvd* or video games or screen time or screen usage or screen use or vcr) AND (obese or obesity or fat or body mass or waist or overweight or skinfold or weight* or bmi or obeseness )) and ((Economic evaluation:ZDT and Bibliographic:ZPS) OR (Economic evaluation:ZDT and Abstract:ZPS)) IN NHSEED FROM 1966 TO 2014 Database: EconLit (EBSCOHost) Date Searched: 1/23/2014 Results: 187 Search Strategy: S3 S1 AND S2 (187) S2 ( television

2014 Community Preventive Services Task Force

13. Association Between Screen Time and Children's Performance on a Developmental Screening Test. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Association Between Screen Time and Children's Performance on a Developmental Screening Test. Excessive screen time is associated with delays in development; however, it is unclear if greater screen time predicts lower performance scores on developmental screening tests or if children with poor developmental performance receive added screen time as a way to modulate challenging behavior.To assess the directional association between screen time and child development in a population of mothers (...) and children.This longitudinal cohort study used a 3-wave, cross-lagged panel model in 2441 mothers and children in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, drawn from the All Our Families study. Data were available when children were aged 24, 36, and 60 months. Data were collected between October 20, 2011, and October 6, 2016. Statistical analyses were conducted from July 31 to November 15, 2018.Media.At age 24, 36, and 60 months, children's screen-time behavior (total hours per week) and developmental outcomes (Ages

2019 JAMA pediatrics

14. Is screen time associated with anxiety or depression in young people? Results from a UK birth cohort. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Is screen time associated with anxiety or depression in young people? Results from a UK birth cohort. There is limited and conflicting evidence for associations between use of screen-based technology and anxiety and depression in young people. We examined associations between screen time measured at 16 years and anxiety and depression at 18.Participants (n = 14,665; complete cases n = 1869) were from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, a UK-based prospective cohort study. We (...) assessed associations between various types of screen time (watching television, using a computer, and texting, all measured via questionnaire at 16y), both on weekdays and at weekends, and anxiety and depression (measured via the Revised Clinical Interview Schedule at 18y). Using ordinal logistic regression, we adjusted for multiple confounders, particularly focussing on activities that might have been replaced by screen time (for example exercising or playing outdoors).More time spent using

2019 BMC Public Health

15. Screen time among Spanish university students with disabilities: a self-organizing maps analysis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Screen time among Spanish university students with disabilities: a self-organizing maps analysis. Screen time can play a significant role in the health and quality of life of people with disabilities. However, there is a lack of studies on this issue among people with disabilities, and even fewer in the university setting. Thus, the aim of our study was to explore the relationships between screen time, disability grade, body mass index (BMI), physical activity and sociodemographic variables (...) reported high values in overall screen time (5.45 h per day/week), with computers being the media most used (2.45 h per day/week). The SOM analysis showed slightly higher screen time values in women than men. People with a high disability grade spent less screen time than those with lower disability grade. Contradictory results exist when a group of men with the highest BMI had the highest screen time and the lowest physical activity (PA) while women with low BMI show the highest screen time

2019 BMC Public Health

16. Area deprivation, screen time and consumption of food and drink high in fat salt and sugar (HFSS) in young people: results from a cross-sectional study in the UK. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Area deprivation, screen time and consumption of food and drink high in fat salt and sugar (HFSS) in young people: results from a cross-sectional study in the UK. To investigate associations between deprivation in young people and consumption of foods high in fat, salt and sugar (HFSS), screen time exposure and health knowledge.An online cross-sectional survey with people aged 11-19 years in the UK, where participants reported consumption behaviours across 13 HFSS and two non-HFSS groups (...) ; screen time for commercial television and streaming services; and knowledge of health conditions and their links to obesity.UK PARTICIPANTS: A total of 3348 young people aged 11-19 years across the UK.The study assessed the consumption behaviours, commercial screen time exposure and the health knowledge of 3348 people aged 11-19 years. Multivariate binary regression analysis, controlling for age and gender, was performed.Deprivation level was associated with increases in consumption of six

2019 BMJ open

17. The longitudinal impact of diet, physical activity, sleep, and screen time on Canadian adolescents' academic achievement: An analysis from the COMPASS study. (Abstract)

The longitudinal impact of diet, physical activity, sleep, and screen time on Canadian adolescents' academic achievement: An analysis from the COMPASS study. Adequate amounts of physical activity, sleep, and screen time along with a healthy diet have been demonstrated to have positive associations with academic achievement. No longitudinal study has investigated the simultaneous relationship between all of these behaviours and academic achievement. Data from 11,016 adolescent participants (...) information, body weight status, and baseline academic achievement. Students who adhered to a greater number of recommendations performed better than students who adhered to fewer recommendations. Meeting recommendations for Meat and Alternatives (protein-rich foods) and screen time were consistently associated with higher academic achievement compared to students who did not meet these recommendations. A change from not meeting recommendations for Vegetables and Fruit to meeting the recommendation

2019 Preventive Medicine

18. Feasibility of wearable cameras to assess screen time and time spent restrained in children aged 3 to 5 years: a study protocol. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Feasibility of wearable cameras to assess screen time and time spent restrained in children aged 3 to 5 years: a study protocol. Wearable cameras may help overcome the limitations of existing tools to measure young children's sedentary behaviour, but their use introduces a range of ethical challenges. The primary aim of this study is to determine the feasibility of using wearable cameras to measure the two aspects of sedentary behaviour currently included in evidence-based guidelines (ie (...) , screen time and time spent restrained). If shown to be feasible, a secondary aim will be to validate subjective measures against the directly measured screen time and time spent restrained.A convenience sample (n=20) will be recruited via flyers at the University of Strathclyde and advertisements on online forums for parents of young children (aged 3 to 5 years). Children will be provided with a wearable camera, attached to the front of their clothing with a clip, to be worn for 3 days (2 non

2019 BMJ open

19. Physical activity and screen time in out of school hours care: an observational study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Physical activity and screen time in out of school hours care: an observational study. This study aimed to describe, and identify predictors of, physical activity and screen time in children attending out of school hours care (OSHC).Twenty-three randomly selected OSHC centres (n = 1068 children) participated in this observational, cross-sectional study. Service directors completed interviews regarding policy, training, scheduling and equipment related to physical activity and screen time (...) . Children's activity behaviours (moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), light physical activity, sedentary time and screen time) were measured using standardised direct observation.Directors' interviews revealed a lack of formal policy guiding physical activity and screen time. Time spent in activity behaviours varied widely among OSHC services; for example, average time spent in MVPA ranged from 4 to 49% of the session, time spent sedentary ranged from 31 to 79%, and screen time accounted for 0

2019 BMC Pediatrics

20. Association of Screen Time and Depression in Adolescence. (Abstract)

Association of Screen Time and Depression in Adolescence. Increases in screen time have been found to be associated with increases in depressive symptoms. However, longitudinal studies are lacking.To repeatedly measure the association between screen time and depression to test 3 explanatory hypotheses: displacement, upward social comparison, and reinforcing spirals.This secondary analysis used data from a randomized clinical trial assessing the 4-year efficacy of a personality-targeted drug (...) and alcohol prevention intervention. This study assessed screen time and depression throughout 4 years, using an annual survey in a sample of adolescents who entered the seventh grade in 31 schools in the Greater Montreal area. Data were collected from September 2012 to September 2018. Analysis began and ended in December 2018.Independent variables were social media, television, video gaming, and computer use. Symptoms of depression was the outcome, measured using the Brief Symptoms Inventory. Exercise

2019 JAMA pediatrics Controlled trial quality: uncertain

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