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161. Why – and how – I wrote Bad Pharma

Why – and how – I wrote Bad Pharma Why – and how – I wrote Bad Pharma – Bad Science Search TED Talk Collected Journalism This Nerdy Book This Great Book T-shirts Categories (3) (4) (6) (45) (28) (6) (16) (190) (5) (20) (52) (88) (2) (1) (2) (1) (677) (4) (14) (2) (37) (4) (9) (3) (11) (6) (3) (16) (13) (1) (6) (8) (6) (6) (3) (13) (2) (2) (27) (1) (2) (6) (1) (7) (8) (3) (1) (4) (12) (1) (3) (20) (2) (13) (1) (20) (15) (4) (1) (20) (1) (1) (1) (1) (3) (25) (2) (2) (4) (2) (1) (9) (6) (6) (2) (4 (...) ) (3) (18) (10) (1) October 8th, 2013 by Ben Goldacre in | This is my piece for Waterstones Book Club, where I was asked to write about why – and how – I wrote . The full book club caboodle is , and you can buy the book . Here it is… ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ I wrote this book because we need to fix a set of problems that have been allowed to persist in my own profession – medicine – for far too long. Trial results can be withheld from doctors and patients, quite legally; trials are often

2013 Bad Science

162. Searching for the right evidence: how to answer your clinical questions using the 6S hierarchy

Searching for the right evidence: how to answer your clinical questions using the 6S hierarchy Searching for the right evidence: how to answer your clinical questions using the 6S hierarchy | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts (...) OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Searching for the right evidence: how to answer your clinical questions using the 6S hierarchy Article Text Primer Searching for the right evidence: how to answer your clinical questions using the 6S

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2013 Evidence-Based Medicine

163. The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps

The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps | PLOS Blogs Network PLOS Blogs Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Diverse perspectives on science and medicine Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary (...) Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Post navigation in Uncategorized States across the U.S. ( ) are making strides to better understand and close the racial achievement gaps at the K-12 and college level. This week, we’re pleased to present the work of Dr. Monica Medina, who uses her training in educational research to meet underserved schools and communities where they are, learn what issues they face, and consider how academic research may help solve them. –Katlyn Hughes

2018 PLOS Blogs Network

164. The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps

The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps | PLOS Blogs Network PLOS Blogs Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Diverse perspectives on science and medicine Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary (...) Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Post navigation in Uncategorized States across the U.S. ( ) are making strides to better understand and close the racial achievement gaps at the K-12 and college level. This week, we’re pleased to present the work of Dr. Monica Medina, who uses her training in educational research to meet underserved schools and communities where they are, learn what issues they face, and consider how academic research may help solve them. –Katlyn Hughes

2018 PLOS Blogs Network

165. Junaid Nabi and Quoc-Dien Trinh: How not to talk about racial disparities in cancer outcomes

Junaid Nabi and Quoc-Dien Trinh: How not to talk about racial disparities in cancer outcomes Junaid Nabi and Quoc-Dien Trinh: How not to talk about racial disparities in cancer outcomes - The BMJ ---> Stereotypical narratives can harm efforts to address racial disparities in cancer outcomes, say Junaid Nabi and Quoc-Dien Trinh Routinely, in conversations about the disparities in cancer care between black and white patients, and the fact that black patients continue to experience , the same (...) compared to white women, even after adjusting for age. Black men, also, are at a from prostate cancer compared to white men. In the US, against a backdrop of tense race relations and prominent healthcare inequities, the discussion on the complicated relationship between race and cancer has been thrust at the . As physician-scientists who investigate health policy and its effect on minority populations, we are dismayed at how this debate has a misplaced understanding of where disparities in cancer

2018 The BMJ Blog

166. How to communicate basic research in schools – a case study using Drosophila

experiences in science communication or education that take you in interesting alternative professional career directions. Thirdly, serious public communication of our research usually influences the way we do it and how we sell it in publications and grant applications. To put it bluntly: “ If you cannot explain your science and its importance [to a member of the public] , you either have not thought hard enough and need to refine your explanations, or you are doing the wrong thing and should consider (...) How to communicate basic research in schools – a case study using Drosophila How to communicate basic research in schools – a case study using Drosophila | PLOS Blogs Network PLOS Blogs Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Diverse perspectives on science and medicine Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary

2018 PLOS Blogs Network

167. How To Get The Most Out Of A Scientific Conference

How To Get The Most Out Of A Scientific Conference How To Get The Most Out Of A Scientific Conference | PLOS Blogs Network PLOS Blogs Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Diverse perspectives on science and medicine Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis (...) that conferences can burn you out, so you may want to incorporate some downtime into your schedule, too. Many people noted how Twitter enhances the conference experience. Megan Lynch (@may_gun) suggested: “Start following listed guests who have Twitter accts before the conference. Find out what the conf hashtag is. If there isn’t one, invent it and livetweet – people will remember who you are because you’re helping to spread info.” Similar advice was echoed by Efrain Rivera-Serrano (@nakedcapsid): “Join

2018 PLOS Blogs Network

168. How to fulfil China’s potential for carrying out clinical trials

How to fulfil China’s potential for carrying out clinical trials How to fulfil China's potential for carrying out clinical trials - The BMJ ---> Liming Lu , Yuqing Zhang , Gordon Guyatt, Chunzhi Tang, Nenggui Xu Although reactions vary from enthusiasm to trepidation, observers worldwide have recognised China as an international force in a wide variety of domains, including clinical trial research. China has the potential to become one of the world’s most favoured sites for performing clinical (...) for Acupuncture and Moxibustion, and the dean of Medical College of Acu-Moxi and Rehabilit ation, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Nenggui Xu is a professor and director at South China Research Center for Acupuncture and Moxibustion, and the vice president of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Competing interests: None declared. Acknowledgments: This work was supported, in part, by grants from the First-class Discipline Construction Foundation of Guangzhou

2018 The BMJ Blog

169. Tom Jefferson: How Cochrane is doing pharma a good turn

Tom Jefferson: How Cochrane is doing pharma a good turn Tom Jefferson: How Cochrane is doing pharma a good turn - The BMJ ---> The way in which Cochrane produces its reviews is a boon to pharma, says Tom Jefferson We do not know how the pharmaceutical industry viewed the birth of the Cochrane Collaboration but we can be fairly sure that today, if industry is watching, it is surely smiling. This is a consequence of the evolution of Cochrane and its output over the past two decades. Since (...) very good reasons to try (for example) to standardise the content of journal articles that were reporting trials, as any reviewer of the pre-CONSORT era knows. However, the other side of the coin has largely avoided scrutiny. By providing a roadmap of what should be included in a journal submission and how it will be appraised we have furnished a great facilitator for writers trying to get their product (the submission) accepted for publication. “Tell me what you are looking for and I will make

2018 The BMJ Blog

170. How do young adults with diabetes or mental health problems engage with online health information?

How do young adults with diabetes or mental health problems engage with online health information? How do young adults engage with online health information? Search National Elf Service Search National Elf Service » » » » How do young adults with diabetes or mental health problems engage with online health information? Jan 31 2017 Posted by Social media, from blogs and wikis to sites such as Facebook or Twitter, are now common features of everyday life for many people. They provide (...) the opportunity to share experiences of illness and to learn from the shared experiences of others, and previous research has shown this is particularly the case for people managing long-term health conditions. The authors of this recent study (Fergie et al, 2016) wanted to explore not only how young adults with chronic conditions engage with health information they find online, but also how they contributed as ‘producers’ of that online information. This qualitative study explored how online engagement

2017 The Mental Elf

171. Big Booze helped plan $100 million NIH study on alcohol–here’s how they’ve also tried to influence journalists

Big Booze helped plan $100 million NIH study on alcohol–here’s how they’ve also tried to influence journalists Liquor industry involved in planning of NIH study of alcohol benefits Note to our followers: Our nearly 13-year run of daily publication of new content on HealthNewsReview.org came to a close at the end of 2018. Publisher Gary Schwitzer and other contributors may post new articles periodically. But all of the 6,000+ articles we have published contain lessons to help you improve your (...) critical thinking about health care interventions. And those will be still be alive on the site for a couple of years. 6093 Posts Menu March 19, 2018 Big Booze helped plan $100 million NIH study on alcohol–here’s how they’ve also tried to influence journalists Posted By Categories , Tags , , , Kevin Lomangino is the managing editor of HealthNewsReview.org. He tweets as @KLomangino. Like a St. Patrick’s Day hangover, news of federal researchers courting liquor company executives for funding leaves a bad

2018 HealthNewsReview

172. How the U.S. Can Help Resolve the Rohingya Crisis

How the U.S. Can Help Resolve the Rohingya Crisis How the U.S. Can Help Resolve the Rohingya Crisis | RAND Objective Analysis. Effective Solutions. Site-wide navigation Trending Topics Featured Research Activities Spotlight Commentary: Commentary: By Research Area Drawing upon decades of experience, RAND provides research services, systematic analysis, and innovative thinking to a global clientele that includes government agencies, foundations, and private-sector firms. Who We Work For Work (...) —but it was also true before the Saffron Revolution of 2007, which set the wheels of democratization in motion. Myanmar's leaders, and more importantly, the country's population, have already proven that they do not want to remain pawns of China. U.S. demands on Myanmar—backed up by key players including the European Union, India, Japan, and South Korea—should be focused not merely on accepting the Rohingya back but on granting them the safety and citizenship rights enjoyed by all other ethnic minorities

2018 The RAND blog

173. The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps

The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps | PLOS Blogs Network PLOS Blogs Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Diverse perspectives on science and medicine Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary (...) Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Post navigation in Uncategorized States across the U.S. ( ) are making strides to better understand and close the racial achievement gaps at the K-12 and college level. This week, we’re pleased to present the work of Dr. Monica Medina, who uses her training in educational research to meet underserved schools and communities where they are, learn what issues they face, and consider how academic research may help solve them. –Katlyn Hughes

2018 PLOS Blogs Network

174. “Harms of Formula” Vs “Benefits of Breastfeeding” : Why we don’t “know” how to talk about the effects of different ways of feeding babies

paper, even if she is right about general practice, this does not settle how we should talk about formula. Because breastfeeding deeply implicates the mother’s body and agency, positioning breastfeeding as the moral baseline is problematic even if it is the biological norm. To do so takes the mother’s body and agency for granted. It does not fit with our use of the concepts of harm and benefit in other situations. In general, we think of harming someone as making them worse off than a neutral state (...) “Harms of Formula” Vs “Benefits of Breastfeeding” : Why we don’t “know” how to talk about the effects of different ways of feeding babies “Harms of Formula” Vs “Benefits of Breastfeeding” : Why we don’t “know” how to talk about the effects of different ways of feeding babies | Journal of Medical Ethics blog by By I’m sitting in a room filled with people who care deeply about mothers and babies. Many of them have dedicated their lives to improving support for new mothers to have the chance

2018 Journal of Medical Ethics blog

175. Tell me now how do I feel

Tell me now how do I feel Tell me now how do I feel – Bad Science Search TED Talk Collected Journalism This Nerdy Book This Great Book T-shirts Categories (3) (4) (6) (45) (28) (6) (16) (190) (5) (20) (52) (88) (2) (1) (2) (1) (677) (4) (14) (2) (37) (4) (9) (3) (11) (6) (3) (16) (13) (1) (6) (8) (6) (6) (3) (13) (2) (2) (27) (1) (2) (6) (1) (7) (8) (3) (1) (4) (12) (1) (3) (20) (2) (13) (1) (20) (15) (4) (1) (20) (1) (1) (1) (1) (3) (25) (2) (2) (4) (2) (1) (9) (6) (6) (2) (4) (2) (1) (1) (5 (...) ) (1) January 22nd, 2011 by Ben Goldacre in , , , | Ben Goldacre, The Guardian, Saturday 22 January 2011 I’m not going to tell the same story once a year, like some kind of journalistic dirty protest, even if it crops up in parliament, every newspaper, and all over Radio 4: there are more interesting things to say than “Blue Monday is bullshit”, but before we get there, let me briefly clarify how Blue Monday is definitely bullshit. The “most depressing day of the year” began life as a “wacky

2011 Bad Science

176. The International Sports Physical Therapy Specialist: reflections on the UK situation (what we may take for granted)

. The status we have as a profession and Physiotherapy specialty is taken for granted by some, but it has been earned . Still, there is always more to be done and developed. Reflecting back and aspiring forward I will finish by asking you to take a moment to reflect on your career to date; how have you got to where you are? What/who are your influencers? Are you providing opportunities for others? Can you call yourself a registered international sports physical therapist? We all have a role to play (...) The International Sports Physical Therapy Specialist: reflections on the UK situation (what we may take for granted) The International Sports Physical Therapy Specialist: reflections on the UK situation (what we may take for granted) | BJSM blog - social media's leading SEM voice by Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Sport and Exercise Medicine blog series @PhysiosinSport By Colin Paterson ,MSc PGCert (Ed) MCSP SFHEA RISPT I recently presented at the Japanese Physical Therapy Congress

2016 British Journal of Sports Medicine Blog

177. A SHARED study-the benefits and costs of setting up a health research study involving lay co-researchers and how we overcame the challenges (PubMed)

has been to develop recommendations led by service users for health and social care professionals to use at hospital discharge and in care planning for people living with memory loss and their carers. This article is about how the study started and the benefits, costs and challenges we encountered as the lead and lay co-researchers. Once we were successful with the grant application, we had to recruit and train the lay co-researchers and obtain various approvals before we could start the project (...) A SHARED study-the benefits and costs of setting up a health research study involving lay co-researchers and how we overcame the challenges In the United Kingdom (UK), official bodies such as the Department of Health and research funders such as the National Institute for Health Research support and encourage lay involvement in all stages of research studies. The SHARED study has had substantial patient and public involvement (PPI) from developing the idea to dissemination. The aim of the study

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2016 Research involvement and engagement

178. Toward mindfulness in quality-of-life research: perspectives on how to avoid rigor becoming rigidity (PubMed)

Toward mindfulness in quality-of-life research: perspectives on how to avoid rigor becoming rigidity The field of quality-of-life (QOL) research has matured into a discipline with scientific rigor, sophisticated methods, and guidelines. While this maturation is laudable and needed, it can result in a limiting rigidity. We aim to highlight examples of practices that are based on shared research values and principles that, when dogmatically applied, may limit the potential impact of QOL (...) rigid guidelines and checklists that end up driving grant applications.It is hoped that this overview will lead to a reconsideration of a more flexible application of research principles while retaining scientific rigor.

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2017 Quality of Life Research

179. The Higher-Ed Organizational-Scholar Tension: How Scholarship Compatibility and the Alignment of Organizational and Faculty Skills, Values and Support Affects Scholar's Performance and Well-Being (PubMed)

The Higher-Ed Organizational-Scholar Tension: How Scholarship Compatibility and the Alignment of Organizational and Faculty Skills, Values and Support Affects Scholar's Performance and Well-Being Scholars and institutions alike are concerned with academic productivity. Scholars not only further knowledge in their professional fields, they also bring visibility and prestige to themselves and their institutions, which in turn attracts research grants and more qualified faculty and graduate (...) of 803 faculty participants. Our findings shed light on how the above academic factors affect not just academic productivity but also a scholar's well-being. Importantly, we show that academic alignment plays a crucial mediating role when predicting productivity and well-being. These results have important implications for university administrators who develop, and faculty who work under, policies designed to foster professional development and scholarship.

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2017 Frontiers in psychology

180. How Are Service Dogs for Adults with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Integrated with Rehabilitation in Denmark? A Case Study (PubMed)

How Are Service Dogs for Adults with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Integrated with Rehabilitation in Denmark? A Case Study A severe mental illness like Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is known to have psychosocial consequences that can lead to a decreased quality of life. Research in Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT) has revealed that the presence of a dog can have a positive effect on health, e.g., increase quality of life and lessen depression and anxiety. However, canine companionship (...) is not a catch-all solution. Previous research has revealed methodological limitations that prohibit any clear conclusions, as well as a sparsity of critical reflection in anecdotal reports and case studies, which means that more research is needed to contextualize the findings. There has been an increasing interest in animal-assisted intervention in Denmark in recent years. Previously, authorities could only grant service dogs to adults with physical disabilities, but now this has been extended to adults

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2017 Animals : an open access journal from MDPI

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