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161. How effective are family therapies in treating drug misuse in young people? - A meta-analysis

How effective are family therapies in treating drug misuse in young people? - A meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external (...) websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Grant number(s) * Measures of effect * Measures of effect Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Grant number(s) Context and rationale Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Example

2020 PROSPERO

162. How does stigma inform sexual and gender minority health interventions? A systematic review

How does stigma inform sexual and gender minority health interventions? A systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external (...) websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Grant number(s) * Measures of effect * Measures of effect Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Grant number(s) Context and rationale Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Example

2020 PROSPERO

163. How do we teach medical trainees and medical professionals about adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and toxic stress: a systematic review and meta-analysis

How do we teach medical trainees and medical professionals about adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and toxic stress: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content (...) of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Grant number(s) * Measures of effect * Measures of effect Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Grant number(s) Context and rationale Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria

2020 PROSPERO

164. How do symptoms after rectal cancer surgery affect quality of life: a systematic review

How do symptoms after rectal cancer surgery affect quality of life: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites (...) . Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Grant number(s) * Measures of effect * Measures of effect Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Grant number(s) Context and rationale Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Example: Screening

2020 PROSPERO

165. How do manipulations of the central nervous energy state affect the peripheral energy states (or vice versa)? - A systematic review of mammalian experiments

How do manipulations of the central nervous energy state affect the peripheral energy states (or vice versa)? - A systematic review of mammalian experiments Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content (...) of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Grant number(s) * Measures of effect * Measures of effect Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Grant number(s) Context and rationale Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria

2020 PROSPERO

166. A systematic review exploring the experience for parentally bereaved children and their surviving parent to identify how they are supported following the death of a parent. A qualitative synthesis of the evidence

A systematic review exploring the experience for parentally bereaved children and their surviving parent to identify how they are supported following the death of a parent. A qualitative synthesis of the evidence Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD (...) bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Grant number(s) * Measures of effect * Measures of effect Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Grant number(s) Context and rationale Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion

2020 PROSPERO

167. "I prefer dying fast than dying slowly", how institutional abuse worsens the mental health of stranded Syrian, Afghan and Congolese migrants on Lesbos island following the implementation of EU-Turkey deal Full Text available with Trip Pro

"I prefer dying fast than dying slowly", how institutional abuse worsens the mental health of stranded Syrian, Afghan and Congolese migrants on Lesbos island following the implementation of EU-Turkey deal In 2015 and early 2016, close to 1 million migrants transited through Greece, on their way to Western Europe. In early 2016, the closure of the "Balkan-route" and the EU/Turkey-deal led to a drastic reduction in the flow of migrants arriving to the Greek islands. The islands became open (...) detention centers, where people would spend months or years under the constant fear of being returned to Turkey.Syrians were generally granted refugee status in Greece and those arrived before the 20th of March 2016 had the option of being relocated to other European countries. Afghans had some chances of being granted asylum in Greece, whilst most migrants from the Democratic Republic of Congo were refused asylum.In a clinic run by Médecins sans Frontières on Lesbos Island, psychologists observed

2018 Conflict and health

168. My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public?

My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public? My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public? – Bad Science Search TED Talk Collected Journalism This Nerdy Book This Great Book T-shirts Categories (3) (4) (6) (45) (28) (6) (16) (190) (5) (20) (52) (88) (2) (1) (2) (1) (677) (4) (14) (2) (37) (4) (9) (3) (11) (6) (3) (16) (13) (1) (6) (8) (6) (6) (3) (13) (2) (2) (27) (1) (2) (6) (1) (7) (8) (3) (1) (4) (12) (1) (3) (20) (2) (13 (...) press release from Great Ormond Street Hospital, the head of that institution wrote a paranoid and misguided defense (which I have proudly reprinted, in my , in full). Anyway, I wrote an editorial in the BMJ to accompany this new research paper, and I make a series of recommendations about how we can stop academics and their institutions misleading the public. These ideas revolve largely around transparency and shame. The research paper is free to access, my editorial is paywalled for now

2014 Bad Science

169. Hashtag SciComm: How Social Media Platforms Are Shaping the Future of Science

scientist has the interest or resources to achieve thousands of followers, there are certain ways in which scientists can improve their presence and experience in social media. Here are my top five tips on how to do this: Tip #1 – Have a goal. As for every meeting, experiment, or grant – the outcome will depend on the execution of a well-established goal. Whether you want to engage with other scientists, keep up with the literature, provide a service, or communicate science to the public, your goal (...) Hashtag SciComm: How Social Media Platforms Are Shaping the Future of Science Hashtag SciComm: How Social Media Platforms Are Shaping the Future of Science | PLOS Blogs Network PLOS Blogs Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Diverse perspectives on science and medicine Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary

2019 PLOS Blogs Network

170. Billy Boland: How can you know what culture you are operating in, and can it be measured?

and other artefacts a)Basic Underlying Assumptions b)Unconscious, taken-for-granted beliefs and values – Determine behaviour, perception, thought and feeling (Taken from Schein, E. H. (2010). Organizational Culture and Leadership. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass) I’ve found it helpful to think about it like this as it shows how culture is not one objectively defined “thing.” A learning culture or a quality improvement (QI) culture are of course important to aim for, but one can see how aligning (...) Billy Boland: How can you know what culture you are operating in, and can it be measured? Billy Boland: How can you know what culture you are operating in, and can it be measured? - The BMJ ---> It was Heraclitus, the pre-Socratic Philosopher who famously described the concept of constant change. As we move through our life and careers, what appears at first appear to be constant, in fact constantly shifts. I recently celebrated 10 years in my first consultant post (how did that happen

2019 The BMJ Blog

171. My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public?

My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public? My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public? – Bad Science Search TED Talk Collected Journalism This Nerdy Book This Great Book T-shirts Categories (3) (4) (6) (45) (28) (6) (16) (190) (5) (20) (52) (88) (2) (1) (2) (1) (677) (4) (14) (2) (37) (4) (9) (3) (11) (6) (3) (16) (13) (1) (6) (8) (6) (6) (3) (13) (2) (2) (27) (1) (2) (6) (1) (7) (8) (3) (1) (4) (12) (1) (3) (20) (2) (13 (...) press release from Great Ormond Street Hospital, the head of that institution wrote a paranoid and misguided defense (which I have proudly reprinted, in my , in full). Anyway, I wrote an editorial in the BMJ to accompany this new research paper, and I make a series of recommendations about how we can stop academics and their institutions misleading the public. These ideas revolve largely around transparency and shame. The research paper is free to access, my editorial is paywalled for now

2014 Bad Science

172. My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public?

My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public? My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public? – Bad Science Search TED Talk Collected Journalism This Nerdy Book This Great Book T-shirts Categories (3) (4) (6) (45) (28) (6) (16) (190) (5) (20) (52) (88) (2) (1) (2) (1) (677) (4) (14) (2) (37) (4) (9) (3) (11) (6) (3) (16) (13) (1) (6) (8) (6) (6) (3) (13) (2) (2) (27) (1) (2) (6) (1) (7) (8) (3) (1) (4) (12) (1) (3) (20) (2) (13 (...) press release from Great Ormond Street Hospital, the head of that institution wrote a paranoid and misguided defense (which I have proudly reprinted, in my , in full). Anyway, I wrote an editorial in the BMJ to accompany this new research paper, and I make a series of recommendations about how we can stop academics and their institutions misleading the public. These ideas revolve largely around transparency and shame. The research paper is free to access, my editorial is paywalled for now

2014 Bad Science

173. How to conduct a discrete choice experiment for health workforce recruitment and retention in remote and rural areas: a user guide with case studies

How to conduct a discrete choice experiment for health workforce recruitment and retention in remote and rural areas: a user guide with case studies How to Conduct a Discrete Choice Experiment for Health Workforce Recruitment and Retention in Remote and Rural Areas: A UsER GUiDE WitH CAsE stUDiEsi WHO Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data How to conduct a discrete choice experiment for health workforce recruitment and retention in remote and rural areas: a user guide with case studies. 1 (...) , Magnus Lindelow, Christophe Lemiere, Christophe Herbst, Jishnu Das and Rajeev Ahuja. The authors would like to thank all the participants at the meeting organized by WHO, the World Bank and CapacityPlus in October 2010: “Tools for Implementing Rural Retention Strategies: Towards a ‘How To’ Guide for ‘Discrete Choice Experiments’ – A Methods Workshop”, who set the basis for developing this User Guide. 1 1 WHO, 2010. “Tools for Implementing Rural Retention Strategies: Towards a ‘How To’ Guide

2012 Health Economics Research Unit

174. Searching for the right evidence: how to answer your clinical questions using the 6S hierarchy Full Text available with Trip Pro

Searching for the right evidence: how to answer your clinical questions using the 6S hierarchy Searching for the right evidence: how to answer your clinical questions using the 6S hierarchy | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts (...) OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Searching for the right evidence: how to answer your clinical questions using the 6S hierarchy Article Text Primer Searching for the right evidence: how to answer your clinical questions using the 6S

2013 Evidence-Based Medicine

175. Why – and how – I wrote Bad Pharma

Why – and how – I wrote Bad Pharma Why – and how – I wrote Bad Pharma – Bad Science Search TED Talk Collected Journalism This Nerdy Book This Great Book T-shirts Categories (3) (4) (6) (45) (28) (6) (16) (190) (5) (20) (52) (88) (2) (1) (2) (1) (677) (4) (14) (2) (37) (4) (9) (3) (11) (6) (3) (16) (13) (1) (6) (8) (6) (6) (3) (13) (2) (2) (27) (1) (2) (6) (1) (7) (8) (3) (1) (4) (12) (1) (3) (20) (2) (13) (1) (20) (15) (4) (1) (20) (1) (1) (1) (1) (3) (25) (2) (2) (4) (2) (1) (9) (6) (6) (2) (4 (...) ) (3) (18) (10) (1) October 8th, 2013 by Ben Goldacre in | This is my piece for Waterstones Book Club, where I was asked to write about why – and how – I wrote . The full book club caboodle is , and you can buy the book . Here it is… ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ I wrote this book because we need to fix a set of problems that have been allowed to persist in my own profession – medicine – for far too long. Trial results can be withheld from doctors and patients, quite legally; trials are often

2013 Bad Science

176. How do young adults with diabetes or mental health problems engage with online health information? Full Text available with Trip Pro

How do young adults with diabetes or mental health problems engage with online health information? How do young adults engage with online health information? Search National Elf Service Search National Elf Service » » » » How do young adults with diabetes or mental health problems engage with online health information? Jan 31 2017 Posted by Social media, from blogs and wikis to sites such as Facebook or Twitter, are now common features of everyday life for many people. They provide (...) the opportunity to share experiences of illness and to learn from the shared experiences of others, and previous research has shown this is particularly the case for people managing long-term health conditions. The authors of this recent study (Fergie et al, 2016) wanted to explore not only how young adults with chronic conditions engage with health information they find online, but also how they contributed as ‘producers’ of that online information. This qualitative study explored how online engagement

2017 The Mental Elf

177. The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps

The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps | PLOS Blogs Network PLOS Blogs Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Diverse perspectives on science and medicine Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary (...) Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Post navigation in Uncategorized States across the U.S. ( ) are making strides to better understand and close the racial achievement gaps at the K-12 and college level. This week, we’re pleased to present the work of Dr. Monica Medina, who uses her training in educational research to meet underserved schools and communities where they are, learn what issues they face, and consider how academic research may help solve them. –Katlyn Hughes

2018 PLOS Blogs Network

178. Junaid Nabi and Quoc-Dien Trinh: How not to talk about racial disparities in cancer outcomes

Junaid Nabi and Quoc-Dien Trinh: How not to talk about racial disparities in cancer outcomes Junaid Nabi and Quoc-Dien Trinh: How not to talk about racial disparities in cancer outcomes - The BMJ ---> Stereotypical narratives can harm efforts to address racial disparities in cancer outcomes, say Junaid Nabi and Quoc-Dien Trinh Routinely, in conversations about the disparities in cancer care between black and white patients, and the fact that black patients continue to experience , the same (...) compared to white women, even after adjusting for age. Black men, also, are at a from prostate cancer compared to white men. In the US, against a backdrop of tense race relations and prominent healthcare inequities, the discussion on the complicated relationship between race and cancer has been thrust at the . As physician-scientists who investigate health policy and its effect on minority populations, we are dismayed at how this debate has a misplaced understanding of where disparities in cancer

2018 The BMJ Blog

179. The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps

The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps | PLOS Blogs Network PLOS Blogs Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Diverse perspectives on science and medicine Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary (...) Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Post navigation in Uncategorized States across the U.S. ( ) are making strides to better understand and close the racial achievement gaps at the K-12 and college level. This week, we’re pleased to present the work of Dr. Monica Medina, who uses her training in educational research to meet underserved schools and communities where they are, learn what issues they face, and consider how academic research may help solve them. –Katlyn Hughes

2018 PLOS Blogs Network

180. “Harms of Formula” Vs “Benefits of Breastfeeding” : Why we don’t “know” how to talk about the effects of different ways of feeding babies

paper, even if she is right about general practice, this does not settle how we should talk about formula. Because breastfeeding deeply implicates the mother’s body and agency, positioning breastfeeding as the moral baseline is problematic even if it is the biological norm. To do so takes the mother’s body and agency for granted. It does not fit with our use of the concepts of harm and benefit in other situations. In general, we think of harming someone as making them worse off than a neutral state (...) “Harms of Formula” Vs “Benefits of Breastfeeding” : Why we don’t “know” how to talk about the effects of different ways of feeding babies “Harms of Formula” Vs “Benefits of Breastfeeding” : Why we don’t “know” how to talk about the effects of different ways of feeding babies | Journal of Medical Ethics blog by By I’m sitting in a room filled with people who care deeply about mothers and babies. Many of them have dedicated their lives to improving support for new mothers to have the chance

2018 Journal of Medical Ethics blog

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