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"grant funding" or "obtaining grants" or "getting grants" or "grant awards" or (grants and "how to")

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17761. Surgical teaching: how should neurosurgeons handle the conflict of duty to today's patients with the duty to tomorrow's? (PubMed)

Surgical teaching: how should neurosurgeons handle the conflict of duty to today's patients with the duty to tomorrow's? The author examines the problem of tension in neurosurgical teaching between the duty to train residents by providing various levels of unsupervised surgery and the duty to patient care. The duty to train the residents also translates into ensuring the provision of good care for patients of tomorrow by producing competent surgeons. The author contends that both duties can (...) be fulfilled simultaneously, but the surgical tension inherent in this situation must not be ignored or taken for granted.

2003 British Journal of Neurosurgery

17762. Individuality and adaptation across levels of selection: How shall we name and generalize the unit of Darwinism? (PubMed)

Individuality and adaptation across levels of selection: How shall we name and generalize the unit of Darwinism? Two major clarifications have greatly abetted the understanding and fruitful expansion of the theory of natural selection in recent years: the acknowledgment that interactors, not replicators, constitute the causal unit of selection; and the recognition that interactors are Darwinian individuals, and that such individuals exist with potency at several levels of organization (genes (...) , organisms, demes, and species in particular), thus engendering a rich hierarchical theory of selection in contrast with Darwin's own emphasis on the organismic level. But a piece of the argument has been missing, and individuals at levels distinct from organisms have been denied potency (although granted existence within the undeniable logic of the theory), because they do not achieve individuality with the same devices used by organisms and therefore seem weak by comparison. We show here that different

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1999 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

17763. Job achievements of Indian and non-Indian graduates in public health: how do they compare? (PubMed)

Job achievements of Indian and non-Indian graduates in public health: how do they compare? A graduate education program in public health for American Indians was introduced in the fall of 1971 at the College of Public Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. The program was initiated with support from the Office of Economic Opportunity. Between August 1, 1971, and December 31, 1983, 52 American Indians received public health degrees from the University of Oklahoma's College (...) of Public Health. Of that number, 50 received masters degrees in public health; 1 a PhD; and 1 a DrPH degree. Degrees were granted in these disciplines: biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, health administration, health education, and human ecology. This study assesses the job achievements of 51 of those American Indian graduates. Each Indian was paired with a non-Indian graduate randomly selected from a cluster sample compiled from the school's files of non-Indian graduates. The results

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1987 Public Health Reports

17764. How to read a paper. Statistics for the non-statistician. II: "Significant" relations and their pitfalls. (PubMed)

How to read a paper. Statistics for the non-statistician. II: "Significant" relations and their pitfalls. It is possible to be seriously misled by taking the statistical competence (and/or the intellectual honesty) of authors for granted. Some common errors committed (deliberately or inadvertently) by the authors of papers are given in the final box.

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1997 BMJ : British Medical Journal

17765. Medicaid Managed Care: How Do Community Health Centers Fit? (PubMed)

Medicaid Managed Care: How Do Community Health Centers Fit? Managed care has brought about important changes in how the health care system is financed and services delivered. The authors describe the approaches adopted by community health centers to participate in Medicaid managed care and argue that these providers, commonly referred to as providers of last resort, have a role to play in this system. Many challenges lie ahead for these centers, such as the potential imposition of Medicaid (...) block grants, the increasing number of uninsured persons, and cuts in both Federal grants and State budgets. These various forces may adversely impact health centers, leaving them with more uninsured patients and fewer resources.

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1996 Health Care Financing Review

17766. New physician-investigators receiving National Institutes of Health research project grants: a historical perspective on the "endangered species". (PubMed)

and comparative success of physician-scientists competing for NIH research (R01) grants awarded over 40 years.A longitudinal, comparative study of all first-time applicants and recipients of NIH R01 grants between 1964 and 2004 stratified by the principal investigators' major degrees (MD, PhD, or MD and PhD) and their proposed involvement in research of humans or human tissues.Number of first- and second-time NIH R01 grant applicants and recipients by academic degree and by research type (clinical vs (...) New physician-investigators receiving National Institutes of Health research project grants: a historical perspective on the "endangered species". Although concerns have persisted for decades about the production of new physician clinical scientists and their success in receiving and sustaining research supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), no comprehensive analysis documents the experiences of first-time investigators with an MD over a long period.To ascertain the perseverance

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2007 JAMA

17767. An evidence-based guide to writing grant proposals for clinical research. (PubMed)

. This article provides recommendations for the grant-writing process for clinical researchers. On the basis of observations from a National Institutes of Health study section, we describe types and sources of grant funds, provide key recommendations regarding the process of grant writing, and highlight the sections of grants that are frequently scrutinized and critiqued. We also provide specific recommendations to help grant writers improve the quality of areas commonly cited as deficient. Application (...) An evidence-based guide to writing grant proposals for clinical research. The competition for funds to conduct clinical research is intense, and only a minority of grant proposals receive funding. In particular, funding for patient-oriented research lags behind that allocated for basic science research. Grant writing is a skill of fundamental importance to the clinical researcher, and conducting high-quality clinical research requires funds received through successful grant proposals

2005 Annals of Internal Medicine

17768. Tracking publication outcomes of National Institutes of Health grants. (PubMed)

Tracking publication outcomes of National Institutes of Health grants. The peer-review literature is the primary medium through which the findings of funded research are evaluated by and disseminated to the broader scientific community. This study examines when and how grants funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) lead to publications.Data on all investigator-initiated R01 grants funded during 1996 (n = 18211) were extracted from the NIH's Computer Retrieval of Information (...) of publications per grant.The findings support the feasibility and potential utility of efforts to study the link between grant funding and research findings, an early step in the process by which funded science leads to improved clinical and public health.

2005 American Journal of Medicine

17769. Demystifying the NIH grant application process. (PubMed)

Demystifying the NIH grant application process. The process of applying to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for grant funding can be daunting. The objective of this article is to help investigators successfully navigate the NIH grant application process. We focus on the practical aspects of this process, which are commonly learned through trial and error. Our target audience is generalist faculty and fellows who are applying for NIH funding to support their career development

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2007 Journal of General Internal Medicine

17770. Peering at peer review revealed high degree of chance associated with funding of grant applications. (PubMed)

Peering at peer review revealed high degree of chance associated with funding of grant applications. There is a persistent degree of uncertainty and dissatisfaction with the peer review process underlining the need to validate the current grant awarding procedures. This study compared the CLassic Structured Scientific In-depth two reviewer critique (CLASSIC) with an all panel members' independent ranking method (RANKING). Eleven reviewers, reviewed 32 applications for a pilot project (...) that there is a considerable amount of chance associated with funding decisions under the traditional method of assigning the grant to two main reviewers. We recommend using the all reviewer ranking procedure to arrive at decisions about grant applications as this removes the impact of extreme reviews.

2006 Journal of Clinical Epidemiology

17771. The Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant: the Massachusetts experience. (PubMed)

The Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant: the Massachusetts experience. The Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant funds a variety of disparate programs in health promotion and disease prevention. Many of these programs were funded by categorical grants to the States prior to the creation of this block grant in 1981. This block grant allows States to set priorities among the different programs by shifting their funding allocations. In addition, there is considerable (...) opportunity to use these funds creatively in shaping the content of their programs. The Massachusetts Department of Public Health's experience with this block grant is reviewed, showing the grant's critical importance in the department's statewide disease prevention efforts. In order to maximize public health impact, the department has shifted its funding allocations based on explicit criteria. These criteria represent a model that may have widespread applicability for other State health departments.

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1987 Public Health Reports

17772. How to write a grant proposal (PubMed)

How to write a grant proposal 21124678 2011 07 14 2018 11 13 0019-5413 41 1 2007 Jan Indian journal of orthopaedics Indian J Orthop How to write a grant proposal. 23-6 10.4103/0019-5413.30521 Zlowodzki Michael M Division of Orthopedic Surgery, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. Jönsson Anders A Kregor Philip J PJ Bhandari Mohit M eng Journal Article India Indian J Orthop 0137736 0019-5413 2010 12 3 6 0 2007 1 1 0 0 2007 1 1 0 1 ppublish 21124678 10.4103/0019-5413.30521 PMC2981889 J Bone

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2007 Indian journal of orthopaedics

17773. Ten Simple Rules for Getting Grants (PubMed)

Ten Simple Rules for Getting Grants 16501664 2006 07 28 2018 11 13 1553-7358 2 2 2006 Feb PLoS computational biology PLoS Comput. Biol. Ten simple rules for getting grants. e12 Bourne Philip E PE Chalupa Leo M LM eng Editorial United States PLoS Comput Biol 101238922 1553-734X IM Financing, Government Financing, Organized Fund Raising Research economics Research Support as Topic United States 2006 2 28 9 0 2006 7 29 9 0 2006 2 28 9 0 ppublish 16501664 10.1371/journal.pcbi.0020012 PMC1378105

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2006 PLoS computational biology

17774. Getting grant applications funded: lessons from the past and advice for the future (PubMed)

Getting grant applications funded: lessons from the past and advice for the future 15563696 2004 12 21 2008 11 21 0040-6376 59 12 2004 Dec Thorax Thorax Getting grant applications funded: lessons from the past and advice for the future. 1010-1 Laurent G J GJ eng Editorial England Thorax 0417353 0040-6376 IM Financing, Organized Forecasting Pulmonary Medicine economics trends Research Support as Topic economics trends 2004 11 26 9 0 2004 12 22 9 0 2004 11 26 9 0 ppublish 15563696 59/12/1010

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2004 Thorax

17775. Should journals decide who gets grants? (PubMed)

Should journals decide who gets grants? 6713325 1984 06 08 2018 11 13 0008-4409 130 9 1984 May 01 Canadian Medical Association journal Can Med Assoc J Should journals decide who gets grants? 1101 Morgan P P PP eng Editorial Canada Can Med Assoc J 0414110 0008-4409 AIM IM Publishing Research Support as Topic organization & administration 1984 5 1 1984 5 1 0 1 1984 5 1 0 0 ppublish 6713325 PMC1876032 J Neurobiol. 1983 Mar;14(2):95-112 6842193 Med Hypotheses. 1983 Jun;11(2):147-56 6888303 Can Med

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1984 Canadian Medical Association Journal

17776. Should journals decide who gets grants? (PubMed)

Should journals decide who gets grants? 20314419 2010 06 28 2018 11 13 0008-4409 131 5 1984 Sep 01 Canadian Medical Association journal Can Med Assoc J Should journals decide who gets grants? 423-6 Osmond D H DH eng Journal Article Canada Can Med Assoc J 0414110 0008-4409 2010 3 24 6 0 1984 9 1 0 0 1984 9 1 0 1 ppublish 20314419 PMC1483476 J Neurobiol. 1983 Mar;14(2):95-112 6842193 Med Hypotheses. 1983 Jun;11(2):147-56 6888303

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1984 Canadian Medical Association Journal

17777. How to get a grant funded (PubMed)

How to get a grant funded 9848911 1999 01 21 2008 11 20 0959-8138 317 7173 1998 Dec 12 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ How to get a grant funded. 1647-8 Goldblatt D D Institute of Child Health and The Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, University of London, London WC1N 1EH. d.goldblatt@ich.ucl.ac.uk eng Journal Article Review England BMJ 8900488 0959-8138 AIM IM Choice Behavior Organizations Research Support as Topic Writing 0 1998 12 16 1998 12 16 0 1 1998 12 16 0 0 ppublish

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1998 BMJ : British Medical Journal

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