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141. How Does Orthopaedic Research Affect Patient Care? (PubMed)

How Does Orthopaedic Research Affect Patient Care? Academic medicine hinges on high-quality results from research. Surgeon scientists spend their career acquiring grants, writing papers, and educating a next generation of scientists. The real question is how well are we at playing this game? Does our research change surgical practice or affect patient care or government policy? Ideally, published research does and will continue to shape the way care is delivered. Key questions remain, however (...) ; what is the return on research investment in orthopaedics? How can surgeons decide which "evidence" matters, and does practice-change only refer to Level I evidence (randomized trials)? This review considers all these questions.

2018 Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma

142. How can emergency physicians harness the power of new technologies in clinical practice and education? (PubMed)

to the emergency clinician. This paper outlines areas of our practice that are already changing and speculates on how we might need to prepare our workforce for a technologically enhanced future.© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted. (...) How can emergency physicians harness the power of new technologies in clinical practice and education? As the Royal College of Emergency Medicine looks back on 50 years of progress towards the future it is clear that new and emerging technologies have the potential to substantially change the practice of emergency medicine. Education, diagnostics, therapeutics are all likely to change as algorithms, personalised medicine and insights into complexity become more readily available

2018 Emergency Medicine Journal

143. How do time trends in inhospital mortality compare? A retrospective study of England and Scotland over 17 years using administrative data. (Full text)

How do time trends in inhospital mortality compare? A retrospective study of England and Scotland over 17 years using administrative data. To examine the trends in inhospital mortality for England and Scotland over a 17-year period to determine whether and if so to what extent the time trends differ after controlling for differences in the patients treated.Analysis of retrospective administrative hospital data using descriptive aggregate statistics of trends in inhospital mortality (...) (elective and emergency), we examine aggregate time trends of the proportion of patients who die in hospital and a binary variable indicating whether an individual patient died in hospital or survived, and how that indicator is influenced by the patient's characteristics, the year and the country (England or Scotland) in which they were admitted.Inhospital mortality has declined in both countries over the period studied, for both elective and emergency admissions, but has declined more in England than

2018 BMJ open

144. Review article: A primer for clinical researchers in the emergency department: Part VII. Considering a research higher degree in emergency medicine: How does it work, where to start, what to consider. (Full text)

Review article: A primer for clinical researchers in the emergency department: Part VII. Considering a research higher degree in emergency medicine: How does it work, where to start, what to consider. In this series we address important topics for clinicians who participate in research or are considering research as part of their career path in emergency medicine. While much emergency research is successfully done by clinicians without a research higher degree (RHD), undertaking a master's (...) degree or doctorate allows a research topic to be pursued in greater depth. It also provides a solid basis for a future research career in terms of research quality, advanced skills, academic progression and track record, as well as eligibility for grants and RHD supervision. The decision to undertake a RHD is not an easy one, and requires consideration of the time and cost involved, as well as the impact on a clinician's life plans. However, the expertise provided through a RHD often ultimately

2018 Emergency medicine Australasia

145. How Much Blood Could a JP Suck If a JP Could Suck Blood? (PubMed)

How Much Blood Could a JP Suck If a JP Could Suck Blood? Active surgical drains minimize fluid accumulation in the postoperative period. The Jackson-Pratt (JP) system consists of a silicone drain connected by flexible tubing to a bulb. When air in the bulb is evacuated, negative pressure is applied at the surgical site to aspirate fluid. The objective of this study was to determine if the evacuation method and volume of accumulated fluid affect the pressure generated by the bulb.Bulbs were (...) a side-in evacuation of a JP bulb was 87.4 cm H2 O compared to 17.7 cm H2 O for a bottom-up evacuation (P < 0.0001). When the drain contained 25 mL, 50 mL, 75 mL, and 100 mL of fluid, the pressure applied dropped to 72.6, 41.3, 37.0, and 35.6 cm H2 O, respectively.JP drains generate negative pressure in order to reduce fluid accumulation at surgical sites. Although its function is frequently taken for granted, this study demonstrates that both the specific method for evacuating the bulb as well

2018 Laryngoscope

146. Undergraduate medical students' behavioural intentions towards medical errors and how to handle them: a qualitative vignette study. (Full text)

to adequately deal with errors. Educators need to introduce knowledge and skills on how to deal with errors and emotional preparedness for errors into undergraduate medical education.© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted. (...) Undergraduate medical students' behavioural intentions towards medical errors and how to handle them: a qualitative vignette study. In undergraduate medical education, the topics of errors in medicine and patient safety are under-represented. The aim of this study was to explore undergraduate medical students' behavioural intentions when confronted with an error.A qualitative case vignette survey was conducted including one of six randomly distributed case scenarios in which a hypothetical

2018 BMJ open

147. How can positive and negative trainer feedback in the operating theatre impact a surgical trainee's confidence and well-being: a qualitative study in the north of England. (Full text)

How can positive and negative trainer feedback in the operating theatre impact a surgical trainee's confidence and well-being: a qualitative study in the north of England. To identify the perception of positive feedback (PF) and negative feedback (NF) provided by trainers in the operating theatre on surgical trainees' confidence and well-being.Narrative interview study.Twelve hospitals that form part of one deanery within the UK.Maximum variation sampling of 15 higher general surgical trainees (...) provided insight into how PF and NF from trainers in the operating theatre affect confidence and well-being.Narrative telephone interviews were conducted with general surgical trainees between April and June 2016. All interviews were recorded, transcribed and anonymised. Transcriptions were analysed using the five-step framework analysis by two independent researchers.Fifteen trainees (age 28-38 years) were interviewed (median interview time: 29 min). Thematic framework analysis identified nine themes

2018 BMJ open

148. How patients' experiences of respiratory tract infections affect healthcare-seeking and antibiotic use: insights from a cross-sectional survey in rural Anhui, China. (Full text)

How patients' experiences of respiratory tract infections affect healthcare-seeking and antibiotic use: insights from a cross-sectional survey in rural Anhui, China. To investigate the occurrence of reported respiratory tract infection (RTI) symptoms and their effects on use of self and professional care among patients in the community.A cross-sectional retrospective household survey.12 administrative villages from rural Anhui, China.2160 rural adult residents aged ≥18 years registered as rural (...) . No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

2018 BMJ open

149. How many people have been bitten by dogs? A cross-sectional survey of prevalence, incidence and factors associated with dog bites in a UK community (Full text)

How many people have been bitten by dogs? A cross-sectional survey of prevalence, incidence and factors associated with dog bites in a UK community Dog bite studies are typically based on hospital records and may be biased towards bites requiring significant medical treatment. This study investigated true dog bite prevalence and incidence at a community-level and victim-related risk factors, in order to inform policy and prevention.A cross-sectional study of a community of 1280 households (...) requires further investigation and potential consideration in the design of bite prevention schemes.© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

2018 Journal of epidemiology and community health

150. A Systematic Review of U.S. Biosimilar Approvals: What Evidence Does the FDA Require and How Are Manufacturers Responding? (PubMed)

A Systematic Review of U.S. Biosimilar Approvals: What Evidence Does the FDA Require and How Are Manufacturers Responding? Biosimilars undergo an abbreviated licensure pathway called 351(k), which was created by the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009. This approval process is different from the 351(a) pathway for original biologic approval and, as of August 2017, has been used to approve 5 biosimilars in the United States.To identify the types and quantities of evidence (...) a baseline understanding of what type and degree of evidence is required for biosimilar approval.There was no external funding for this study. Hung reports employment as a pharmacist for CVS Health, an AHRQ F32 grant, and meeting/accommodation/travel support from AACP, DIA, and ISPOR, all outside the submitted work. Vu and Mostovoy have nothing to disclose. Study concept and design were contributed by Hung and Mostovoy, along with Vu. Hung and Vu collected the data, and data interpretation was performed

2018 Journal of managed care & specialty pharmacy

151. Billy Boland: How can you know what culture you are operating in, and can it be measured?

and other artefacts a)Basic Underlying Assumptions b)Unconscious, taken-for-granted beliefs and values – Determine behaviour, perception, thought and feeling (Taken from Schein, E. H. (2010). Organizational Culture and Leadership. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass) I’ve found it helpful to think about it like this as it shows how culture is not one objectively defined “thing.” A learning culture or a quality improvement (QI) culture are of course important to aim for, but one can see how aligning (...) Billy Boland: How can you know what culture you are operating in, and can it be measured? Billy Boland: How can you know what culture you are operating in, and can it be measured? - The BMJ ---> It was Heraclitus, the pre-Socratic Philosopher who famously described the concept of constant change. As we move through our life and careers, what appears at first appear to be constant, in fact constantly shifts. I recently celebrated 10 years in my first consultant post (how did that happen

2019 The BMJ Blog

152. My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public?

My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public? My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public? – Bad Science Search TED Talk Collected Journalism This Nerdy Book This Great Book T-shirts Categories (3) (4) (6) (45) (28) (6) (16) (190) (5) (20) (52) (88) (2) (1) (2) (1) (677) (4) (14) (2) (37) (4) (9) (3) (11) (6) (3) (16) (13) (1) (6) (8) (6) (6) (3) (13) (2) (2) (27) (1) (2) (6) (1) (7) (8) (3) (1) (4) (12) (1) (3) (20) (2) (13 (...) press release from Great Ormond Street Hospital, the head of that institution wrote a paranoid and misguided defense (which I have proudly reprinted, in my , in full). Anyway, I wrote an editorial in the BMJ to accompany this new research paper, and I make a series of recommendations about how we can stop academics and their institutions misleading the public. These ideas revolve largely around transparency and shame. The research paper is free to access, my editorial is paywalled for now

2014 Bad Science

153. Hashtag SciComm: How Social Media Platforms Are Shaping the Future of Science

scientist has the interest or resources to achieve thousands of followers, there are certain ways in which scientists can improve their presence and experience in social media. Here are my top five tips on how to do this: Tip #1 – Have a goal. As for every meeting, experiment, or grant – the outcome will depend on the execution of a well-established goal. Whether you want to engage with other scientists, keep up with the literature, provide a service, or communicate science to the public, your goal (...) Hashtag SciComm: How Social Media Platforms Are Shaping the Future of Science Hashtag SciComm: How Social Media Platforms Are Shaping the Future of Science | PLOS Blogs Network PLOS Blogs Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Diverse perspectives on science and medicine Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary

2019 PLOS Blogs Network

154. My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public?

My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public? My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public? – Bad Science Search TED Talk Collected Journalism This Nerdy Book This Great Book T-shirts Categories (3) (4) (6) (45) (28) (6) (16) (190) (5) (20) (52) (88) (2) (1) (2) (1) (677) (4) (14) (2) (37) (4) (9) (3) (11) (6) (3) (16) (13) (1) (6) (8) (6) (6) (3) (13) (2) (2) (27) (1) (2) (6) (1) (7) (8) (3) (1) (4) (12) (1) (3) (20) (2) (13 (...) press release from Great Ormond Street Hospital, the head of that institution wrote a paranoid and misguided defense (which I have proudly reprinted, in my , in full). Anyway, I wrote an editorial in the BMJ to accompany this new research paper, and I make a series of recommendations about how we can stop academics and their institutions misleading the public. These ideas revolve largely around transparency and shame. The research paper is free to access, my editorial is paywalled for now

2014 Bad Science

155. My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public?

My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public? My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public? – Bad Science Search TED Talk Collected Journalism This Nerdy Book This Great Book T-shirts Categories (3) (4) (6) (45) (28) (6) (16) (190) (5) (20) (52) (88) (2) (1) (2) (1) (677) (4) (14) (2) (37) (4) (9) (3) (11) (6) (3) (16) (13) (1) (6) (8) (6) (6) (3) (13) (2) (2) (27) (1) (2) (6) (1) (7) (8) (3) (1) (4) (12) (1) (3) (20) (2) (13 (...) press release from Great Ormond Street Hospital, the head of that institution wrote a paranoid and misguided defense (which I have proudly reprinted, in my , in full). Anyway, I wrote an editorial in the BMJ to accompany this new research paper, and I make a series of recommendations about how we can stop academics and their institutions misleading the public. These ideas revolve largely around transparency and shame. The research paper is free to access, my editorial is paywalled for now

2014 Bad Science

156. How to conduct a discrete choice experiment for health workforce recruitment and retention in remote and rural areas: a user guide with case studies

How to conduct a discrete choice experiment for health workforce recruitment and retention in remote and rural areas: a user guide with case studies How to Conduct a Discrete Choice Experiment for Health Workforce Recruitment and Retention in Remote and Rural Areas: A UsER GUiDE WitH CAsE stUDiEsi WHO Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data How to conduct a discrete choice experiment for health workforce recruitment and retention in remote and rural areas: a user guide with case studies. 1 (...) , Magnus Lindelow, Christophe Lemiere, Christophe Herbst, Jishnu Das and Rajeev Ahuja. The authors would like to thank all the participants at the meeting organized by WHO, the World Bank and CapacityPlus in October 2010: “Tools for Implementing Rural Retention Strategies: Towards a ‘How To’ Guide for ‘Discrete Choice Experiments’ – A Methods Workshop”, who set the basis for developing this User Guide. 1 1 WHO, 2010. “Tools for Implementing Rural Retention Strategies: Towards a ‘How To’ Guide

2012 Health Economics Research Unit

157. Searching for the right evidence: how to answer your clinical questions using the 6S hierarchy (Full text)

Searching for the right evidence: how to answer your clinical questions using the 6S hierarchy Searching for the right evidence: how to answer your clinical questions using the 6S hierarchy | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts (...) OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Searching for the right evidence: how to answer your clinical questions using the 6S hierarchy Article Text Primer Searching for the right evidence: how to answer your clinical questions using the 6S

2013 Evidence-Based Medicine

158. Why – and how – I wrote Bad Pharma

Why – and how – I wrote Bad Pharma Why – and how – I wrote Bad Pharma – Bad Science Search TED Talk Collected Journalism This Nerdy Book This Great Book T-shirts Categories (3) (4) (6) (45) (28) (6) (16) (190) (5) (20) (52) (88) (2) (1) (2) (1) (677) (4) (14) (2) (37) (4) (9) (3) (11) (6) (3) (16) (13) (1) (6) (8) (6) (6) (3) (13) (2) (2) (27) (1) (2) (6) (1) (7) (8) (3) (1) (4) (12) (1) (3) (20) (2) (13) (1) (20) (15) (4) (1) (20) (1) (1) (1) (1) (3) (25) (2) (2) (4) (2) (1) (9) (6) (6) (2) (4 (...) ) (3) (18) (10) (1) October 8th, 2013 by Ben Goldacre in | This is my piece for Waterstones Book Club, where I was asked to write about why – and how – I wrote . The full book club caboodle is , and you can buy the book . Here it is… ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ I wrote this book because we need to fix a set of problems that have been allowed to persist in my own profession – medicine – for far too long. Trial results can be withheld from doctors and patients, quite legally; trials are often

2013 Bad Science

159. The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps

The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps | PLOS Blogs Network PLOS Blogs Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Diverse perspectives on science and medicine Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary (...) Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Post navigation in Uncategorized States across the U.S. ( ) are making strides to better understand and close the racial achievement gaps at the K-12 and college level. This week, we’re pleased to present the work of Dr. Monica Medina, who uses her training in educational research to meet underserved schools and communities where they are, learn what issues they face, and consider how academic research may help solve them. –Katlyn Hughes

2018 PLOS Blogs Network

160. The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps

The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps The Nexus of Data and Community: How Partnership Can Close Achievement Gaps | PLOS Blogs Network PLOS Blogs Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Diverse perspectives on science and medicine Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary (...) Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Post navigation in Uncategorized States across the U.S. ( ) are making strides to better understand and close the racial achievement gaps at the K-12 and college level. This week, we’re pleased to present the work of Dr. Monica Medina, who uses her training in educational research to meet underserved schools and communities where they are, learn what issues they face, and consider how academic research may help solve them. –Katlyn Hughes

2018 PLOS Blogs Network

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