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121. Maria Hägglund: Electronic health records in Sweden—how can we go from transparency to collaboration?

Maria Hägglund: Electronic health records in Sweden—how can we go from transparency to collaboration? Maria Hägglund: Electronic health records in Sweden—how can we go from transparency to collaboration? - The BMJ ---> I have had full access to my electronic health record (EHR) online since 2012, when Uppsala became the first region in Sweden to make EHR accessible to patients. I remember the excitement I felt the first time I logged in, and I’ve continued to use the patient accessible EHR (...) (PAEHR) referred to as “ ” ever since. As a health informatics researcher and a member of the , I also have a special interest in how the PAEHR is designed and used. In March 2017, I attended a session at the Salzburg Global Seminar called The session was focused on transparency and the importance of patients being able to access their EHRs. The Swedish national health information exchange (HIE) platform and PAEHR received a lot of attention (both during the seminar and ), but I left Salzburg

2017 The BMJ Blog

122. How Would the House Health Care Plan Affect People with Preexisting Conditions?

How Would the House Health Care Plan Affect People with Preexisting Conditions? How Would the House Health Care Plan Affect People with Pre-Existing Conditions? | RAND Objective Analysis. Effective Solutions. Site-wide navigation Trending Topics Featured Research Activities Spotlight Commentary: Commentary: By Research Area Drawing upon decades of experience, RAND provides research services, systematic analysis, and innovative thinking to a global clientele that includes government agencies (...) carefully to better understand how it could affect people with pre-existing conditions — and what protections remain in place. How will the House's health care bill affect those with pre-existing conditions? Under the bill, individuals with pre-existing conditions cannot be denied coverage or charged higher premiums on the basis of their health status, as long as they remain continuously enrolled in insurance. However, key protections can be waived for individuals who have a coverage lapse. By default

2017 The RAND blog

123. A Catch-22 in Minority Training: How to Maintain Balance

A Catch-22 in Minority Training: How to Maintain Balance A Catch-22 in Minority Training: How to Maintain Balance | PLOS Blogs Network PLOS Blogs Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Diverse perspectives on science and medicine Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research (...) exclusively focused on preparing trainees for academic careers. While many students would benefit from learning how to succeed in academia, with , a broader perspective would have been beneficial. I experienced similar requirements in 2015 when I attended the Annual Meeting in Philadelphia with the . One huge perk of the Minority Scholar in Cancer Research Award was that this travel award included networking events that allowed minority trainees the incredible chance to meet thought leaders in their field

2017 PLOS Blogs Network

124. The PrEP ‘care continuum/cascade’: how would it look?

The PrEP ‘care continuum/cascade’: how would it look? The PrEP ‘care continuum/cascade’: how would it look? | Sexually Transmitted Infections by We take for granted the value of the (or ‘cascade’), now increasingly seen as the key measure of health system response to HIV ( ). The application of this model to HIV has provided a benchmark for evaluation in contexts as diverse as Moscow ( ), South Africa ( ) or the Netherlands ( ). But could the same model also offer a means of evaluation

2017 Sexually Transmitted Infections blog

125. How Scarce Funding Shapes Young Scientists

ended up like this, or more importantly, what, if anything, can be done about it. How to address these questions remains an ongoing conversation among those in the field—one that has become exponentially more complicated in light of recent and alarming reports in the news concerning the future of federal funding for biomedical research. Eleventh hour blog post renovations When I first began writing this post, my goal was to address how the current atmosphere of scarce grant funding is shaping (...) navigation in Uncategorized Source: Ask any young science faculty member what keeps them up at night, and you’re likely to get the same response every time: funding research . It is no secret that modern scientific research depends on receiving sufficient funding. In fact, grants have become so essential that the entire trajectory of one’s career in academic science is tightly linked with the ability to obtain funding. Readers who can identify with this struggle have probably asked themselves how science

2017 PLOS Blogs Network

126. How does evidence affect clinical decision-making?

How does evidence affect clinical decision-making? How does evidence affect clinical decision-making? | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search (...) for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here How does evidence affect clinical decision-making? Article Text Original EBM Research How does evidence affect clinical decision-making? Paul Fontelo , Fang Liu , Raymonde C Uy Statistics from Altmetric.com Extract In 1998, the ‘Evidence Cart’ was introduced to provide decision support tools

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2015 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

127. A SHARED study-the benefits and costs of setting up a health research study involving lay co-researchers and how we overcame the challenges (PubMed)

has been to develop recommendations led by service users for health and social care professionals to use at hospital discharge and in care planning for people living with memory loss and their carers. This article is about how the study started and the benefits, costs and challenges we encountered as the lead and lay co-researchers. Once we were successful with the grant application, we had to recruit and train the lay co-researchers and obtain various approvals before we could start the project (...) A SHARED study-the benefits and costs of setting up a health research study involving lay co-researchers and how we overcame the challenges In the United Kingdom (UK), official bodies such as the Department of Health and research funders such as the National Institute for Health Research support and encourage lay involvement in all stages of research studies. The SHARED study has had substantial patient and public involvement (PPI) from developing the idea to dissemination. The aim of the study

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2016 Research involvement and engagement

128. My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public?

My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public? My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public? – Bad Science Search TED Talk Collected Journalism This Nerdy Book This Great Book T-shirts Categories (3) (4) (6) (45) (28) (6) (16) (190) (5) (20) (52) (88) (2) (1) (2) (1) (677) (4) (14) (2) (37) (4) (9) (3) (11) (6) (3) (16) (13) (1) (6) (8) (6) (6) (3) (13) (2) (2) (27) (1) (2) (6) (1) (7) (8) (3) (1) (4) (12) (1) (3) (20) (2) (13 (...) press release from Great Ormond Street Hospital, the head of that institution wrote a paranoid and misguided defense (which I have proudly reprinted, in my , in full). Anyway, I wrote an editorial in the BMJ to accompany this new research paper, and I make a series of recommendations about how we can stop academics and their institutions misleading the public. These ideas revolve largely around transparency and shame. The research paper is free to access, my editorial is paywalled for now

2014 Bad Science

129. My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public?

My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public? My BMJ editorial: how can we stop academic press releases misleading the public? – Bad Science Search TED Talk Collected Journalism This Nerdy Book This Great Book T-shirts Categories (3) (4) (6) (45) (28) (6) (16) (190) (5) (20) (52) (88) (2) (1) (2) (1) (677) (4) (14) (2) (37) (4) (9) (3) (11) (6) (3) (16) (13) (1) (6) (8) (6) (6) (3) (13) (2) (2) (27) (1) (2) (6) (1) (7) (8) (3) (1) (4) (12) (1) (3) (20) (2) (13 (...) press release from Great Ormond Street Hospital, the head of that institution wrote a paranoid and misguided defense (which I have proudly reprinted, in my , in full). Anyway, I wrote an editorial in the BMJ to accompany this new research paper, and I make a series of recommendations about how we can stop academics and their institutions misleading the public. These ideas revolve largely around transparency and shame. The research paper is free to access, my editorial is paywalled for now

2014 Bad Science

130. How to do it. Apply for a research grant. (PubMed)

How to do it. Apply for a research grant. 728716 1979 03 28 2016 11 23 0007-1447 2 6151 1978 Dec 02 British medical journal Br Med J How to do it. Apply for a research grant. 1553-4 Howie J J eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 AIM IM Research Support as Topic United Kingdom 1978 12 2 1978 12 2 0 1 1978 12 2 0 0 ppublish 728716 PMC1608768

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1978 British medical journal

131. Negative affect, message reactance and perceived risk: how do pictorial cigarette pack warnings change quit intentions? (PubMed)

Negative affect, message reactance and perceived risk: how do pictorial cigarette pack warnings change quit intentions? Pictorial warnings on cigarette packs increase motivation to quit smoking. We sought to examine the potential mediating role of negative affect, message reactance (ie, an oppositional reaction to a message) and perceived risk in shaping quit intentions.In 2014 and 2015, we randomly assigned 2149 adult US smokers to receive either pictorial warnings or text-only warnings (...) by increasing negative affect. Message reactance partially attenuated this increase in intentions. The opposing associations of negative affect and reactance on perceived risk may explain why pictorial warnings did not lead to observable changes in perceived risk.© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

2018 Tobacco Control

132. How do time trends in inhospital mortality compare? A retrospective study of England and Scotland over 17 years using administrative data. (PubMed)

How do time trends in inhospital mortality compare? A retrospective study of England and Scotland over 17 years using administrative data. To examine the trends in inhospital mortality for England and Scotland over a 17-year period to determine whether and if so to what extent the time trends differ after controlling for differences in the patients treated.Analysis of retrospective administrative hospital data using descriptive aggregate statistics of trends in inhospital mortality (...) (elective and emergency), we examine aggregate time trends of the proportion of patients who die in hospital and a binary variable indicating whether an individual patient died in hospital or survived, and how that indicator is influenced by the patient's characteristics, the year and the country (England or Scotland) in which they were admitted.Inhospital mortality has declined in both countries over the period studied, for both elective and emergency admissions, but has declined more in England than

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2018 BMJ open

133. How Does Orthopaedic Research Affect Patient Care? (PubMed)

How Does Orthopaedic Research Affect Patient Care? Academic medicine hinges on high-quality results from research. Surgeon scientists spend their career acquiring grants, writing papers, and educating a next generation of scientists. The real question is how well are we at playing this game? Does our research change surgical practice or affect patient care or government policy? Ideally, published research does and will continue to shape the way care is delivered. Key questions remain, however (...) ; what is the return on research investment in orthopaedics? How can surgeons decide which "evidence" matters, and does practice-change only refer to Level I evidence (randomized trials)? This review considers all these questions.

2018 Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma

134. How can emergency physicians harness the power of new technologies in clinical practice and education? (PubMed)

to the emergency clinician. This paper outlines areas of our practice that are already changing and speculates on how we might need to prepare our workforce for a technologically enhanced future.© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted. (...) How can emergency physicians harness the power of new technologies in clinical practice and education? As the Royal College of Emergency Medicine looks back on 50 years of progress towards the future it is clear that new and emerging technologies have the potential to substantially change the practice of emergency medicine. Education, diagnostics, therapeutics are all likely to change as algorithms, personalised medicine and insights into complexity become more readily available

2018 Emergency Medicine Journal

135. Undergraduate medical students' behavioural intentions towards medical errors and how to handle them: a qualitative vignette study. (PubMed)

to adequately deal with errors. Educators need to introduce knowledge and skills on how to deal with errors and emotional preparedness for errors into undergraduate medical education.© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted. (...) Undergraduate medical students' behavioural intentions towards medical errors and how to handle them: a qualitative vignette study. In undergraduate medical education, the topics of errors in medicine and patient safety are under-represented. The aim of this study was to explore undergraduate medical students' behavioural intentions when confronted with an error.A qualitative case vignette survey was conducted including one of six randomly distributed case scenarios in which a hypothetical

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2018 BMJ open

136. How does the outcome of research training fellowships funded via the NHS compare with that from competitively funded fellowships from the MRC and other charities: a cross-sectional retrospective survey of trainees undertaking research training in the West (PubMed)

How does the outcome of research training fellowships funded via the NHS compare with that from competitively funded fellowships from the MRC and other charities: a cross-sectional retrospective survey of trainees undertaking research training in the West This study aimed to investigate the impact of research training funded via the National Health Service (NHS) on medical trainees compared with traditional clinical research training fellowships (CRTFs).Online survey of 221 clinical trainees (...) participants to successfully achieve a higher degree.© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

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2018 BMJ open

137. How a symbol influenced this patient encounter

to begin my line of questioning. I smiled at the boy and asked how he was doing. He responded with an indifferent, “Fine.” I then began to ask him the usual questions essential for an HPI (history of present illness), but I couldn’t take my mind off the fact that he was wearing a symbol that I felt characterized a tradition filled with rebellion and hatred. What troubled me even more was that as a kid, he had already been exposed to and taught to support what the Confederacy stood for. Granted, I may (...) How a symbol influenced this patient encounter How a symbol influenced this patient encounter How a symbol influenced this patient encounter | | February 1, 2018 151 Shares I lightly knocked on the door of the next patient that I was set to obtain a history from. It was late in the morning in the middle of the week, and my mind was becoming increasingly preoccupied with deciding what to eat for lunch. My preceptor had allowed me to practice my history-taking skills with every patient that had

2018 KevinMD blog

138. The story of how this physician got into debt

The story of how this physician got into debt The story of how this physician got into debt The story of how this physician got into debt | | January 19, 2018 97 Shares When I was a young lad, just heading off to college, I had no debt. I had no credit cards. My family didn’t use debt for purchases other than buying our house. I really didn’t have any knowledge about how to best use debt. My student loan package included a scholarship, a work-study program and $1,500 a year in student loans. I (...) where that was heading so I joined the Navy, and Uncle Sam paid for the remaining three years of medical school expenses, with enough extra to pay for the necessities of life. I also took on a part-time job in the evenings covering the phones at a local multi-specialty clinic. Life was good, and I was temporarily broke. At that time, my student loan payments were in deferment and not accumulating any interest. I borrowed money, but didn’t need to pay anything back yet. How sweet. During my residency

2018 KevinMD blog

139. End-of-life care in the Western world: where are we now and how did we get here? (PubMed)

End-of-life care in the Western world: where are we now and how did we get here? Recent movements in end-of-life care emphasise community care for the dying; however, integrating community with medical care continues to be a work in progress. Historically tracing brain hemispheric dominance, Ian McGilchrist believes we are overemphasising functionality, domination and categorisation to the detriment of symbolism, empathy and connectedness with others. The aim of this historical review (...) of what seems a rather simple change in end-of-life care.We must question whether it is possible to hand death responsibilities back to the community when medical services have largely assumed this responsibility in countries supporting individualism, secularism and materialism.© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

2018 BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care

140. Resident Autonomy in the Operating Room: How Faculty Assess Real-time Entrustability. (PubMed)

Resident Autonomy in the Operating Room: How Faculty Assess Real-time Entrustability. This study aimed to identify the empirical processes and evidence that expert surgical teachers use to determine whether to take over certain steps or entrust the resident with autonomy to proceed during an operation.Assessing real-time entrustability is inherent in attending surgeons' determinations of residents' intraoperative autonomy in the operating room. To promote residents' autonomy, it is necessary (...) to understand how attending surgeons evaluate residents' performance and support opportunities for independent practice based on the assessment of their entrustability.We conducted qualitative semi-structured interviews with 43 expert surgical teachers from 21 institutions across 4 regions of the United States, using purposeful and snowball sampling. Participants represented a range of program types, program size, and clinical expertise. We applied the Framework Method of content analysis to iteratively

2018 Annals of Surgery

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