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281. A Catch-22 in Minority Training: How to Maintain Balance

A Catch-22 in Minority Training: How to Maintain Balance A Catch-22 in Minority Training: How to Maintain Balance | PLOS Blogs Network PLOS Blogs Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Diverse perspectives on science and medicine Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research (...) exclusively focused on preparing trainees for academic careers. While many students would benefit from learning how to succeed in academia, with , a broader perspective would have been beneficial. I experienced similar requirements in 2015 when I attended the Annual Meeting in Philadelphia with the . One huge perk of the Minority Scholar in Cancer Research Award was that this travel award included networking events that allowed minority trainees the incredible chance to meet thought leaders in their field

2017 PLOS Blogs Network

282. The PrEP ‘care continuum/cascade’: how would it look?

The PrEP ‘care continuum/cascade’: how would it look? The PrEP ‘care continuum/cascade’: how would it look? | Sexually Transmitted Infections by We take for granted the value of the (or ‘cascade’), now increasingly seen as the key measure of health system response to HIV ( ). The application of this model to HIV has provided a benchmark for evaluation in contexts as diverse as Moscow ( ), South Africa ( ) or the Netherlands ( ). But could the same model also offer a means of evaluation

2017 Sexually Transmitted Infections blog

283. How fast is fast enough? Walking cadence (steps/min) as a practical estimate of intensity in adults: a narrative review. Full Text available with Trip Pro

How fast is fast enough? Walking cadence (steps/min) as a practical estimate of intensity in adults: a narrative review. Cadence (steps/min) may be a reasonable proxy-indicator of ambulatory intensity. A summary of current evidence is needed for cadence-based metrics supporting benchmark (standard or point of reference) and threshold (minimums associated with desired outcomes) values that are informed by a systematic process.To review how fast, in terms of cadence, is enough, with reference (...) . Peak cadence indicators are negatively associated with increased age and body mass index. Identified intervention studies used cadence to either prescribe and/or quantify ambulatory intensity but the evidence is best described as preliminary.A cadence value of ≥100 steps/min in adults appears to be a consistent and reasonable heuristic answer to 'How fast is fast enough?' during sustained and rhythmic ambulatory behaviour.NCT02650258.© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated

2018 British Journal of Sports Medicine

284. How does light-intensity physical activity associate with adult cardiometabolic health and mortality? Systematic review with meta-analysis of experimental and observational studies. Full Text available with Trip Pro

How does light-intensity physical activity associate with adult cardiometabolic health and mortality? Systematic review with meta-analysis of experimental and observational studies. To assess the relationship between time spent in light physical activity and cardiometabolic health and mortality in adults.Systematic review and meta-analysis.Searches in Medline, Embase, PsycInfo, CINAHL and three rounds of hand searches.Experimental (including acute mechanistic studies and physical activity (...) volume of the prospective epidemiological evidence base and the moderate consistency between observational and laboratory evidence inhibits definitive conclusions.© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2019. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

2018 British Journal of Sports Medicine

285. A Community-Academic Partnership to Address Racial/Ethnic Health Disparities through Grant-Making Full Text available with Trip Pro

A Community-Academic Partnership to Address Racial/Ethnic Health Disparities through Grant-Making Because they focus on culturally and contextually specific health determinants, participatory approaches are well-recognized strategies to reduce health disparities. Yet, few models exist that use academic and community members equally in the grant funding process for programs aimed at reducing and eliminating these disparities. In 2008, the Communities IMPACT Diabetes Center in East Harlem, New (...) York, developed a partnered process to award grants to community groups that target the social determinants of diabetes-related disparities. Community and academic representatives developed a novel strategy to solicit and review grants. This approach fostered equality in decision-making and sparked innovative mechanisms to award $500,000 in small grants. An evaluation of this process revealed that most reviewers perceived the review process to be fair; were able to voice their perspectives

2013 Public Health Reports

286. Policy and practice impacts of applied research: a case study analysis of the New South Wales Health Promotion Demonstration Research Grants Scheme 2000–2006 Full Text available with Trip Pro

impacts of the 15 research projects funded through the New South Wales Health Promotion Demonstration Research Grants Scheme during the period 2000 to 2006, and explored the factors mediating impacts.Data collection included semi-structured interviews with the chief investigators (n = 17) and end-users (n = 29) of each of the 15 projects to explore if, how and under what circumstances the findings had been used, as well as bibliometric analysis and verification using documentary evidence. Data (...) Policy and practice impacts of applied research: a case study analysis of the New South Wales Health Promotion Demonstration Research Grants Scheme 2000–2006 Intervention research provides important information regarding feasible and effective interventions for health policy makers, but few empirical studies have explored the mechanisms by which these studies influence policy and practice. This study provides an exploratory case series analysis of the policy, practice and other related

2013 Health Research Policy and Systems

287. 4 Reasons Why I Won’t Ever Take Family Planning for Granted

4 Reasons Why I Won’t Ever Take Family Planning for Granted 4 Reasons Why I Won’t Ever Take Family Planning for Granted | unfoundation.org 4 Reasons Why I Won’t Ever Take Family Planning for Granted 4 Reasons Why I Won’t Ever Take Family Planning for Granted By Seema Jalan on February 9, 2016 As a woman born and raised in the United States from a middle class family, I’ve enjoyed a privileged life. This includes access to quality, affordable reproductive health care information and services (...) . Without a doubt, this has directly contributed to my ability to complete my education, pursue the professional career of my dreams, and have my beautiful, healthy baby boy when my husband and I were ready. There are few things more central to your life than your reproductive health – yet access to these essential services, like family planning, are too often taken for granted in the U.S. But imagine: What if you were one of the more than 225 million girls and women who want to avoid or delay pregnancy

2016 United Nations Foundation blog

288. New Grants Totaling $4.8 Million Will Bridge Gaps in Care of Older Adults

outreach and education that will improve observation status policy through regulatory change, improved federal guidance, and increased awareness by legislators. The grant funding for this project will also strengthen CMA’s advocacy on other important issues, including increasing access to oral health care for older adults. Our health care systems’ ability to provide good oral health care to older adults is also the focus of an 18-month, $100,170 grant to the , a unique collective of internationally (...) New Grants Totaling $4.8 Million Will Bridge Gaps in Care of Older Adults New Grants Totaling $4.8 Million Will Bridge Gaps in Care of Older Adults Contact JAHF Tel: Fax: The John A. Hartford Foundation 55 East 59th Street 16th Floor New York, NY 10022-1713 / / on June 10, 2016 ), we are addressing the gap in high-quality news coverage and public understanding about the complex issues of health care delivery and its impact on older adults and their families. These projects are part

2016 Health AGEnda blog

289. Launching a New Natural History Grants Program: Building a Solid Foundation for Rare Disease Treatments

Launching a New Natural History Grants Program: Building a Solid Foundation for Rare Disease Treatments FDA Voices: Perspectives From FDA Experts U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Search FDA Submit search News & Events / / / / The FDA impacts our lives every day – from the food we eat and drugs we take, to the medical devices and products we use. More than 20 percent of the goods in the U.S. economy are under our watch. The regulatory and public health work we do is far-reaching (...) and intricate. As our work continues to evolve and public needs become greater and more complex, we are rethinking how we communicate and seizing the opportunity to simplify and streamline how we share information with our stakeholders, collaborators and the public. FDA Voices is a collection of perspectives into the work we do – brought to you by FDA experts – the doctors, scientists, regulators, technologists and others from across the agency, offering thought-provoking insight on a variety of topics

2016 FDA Voice blog

290. Three New Grants Totaling $6.7 Million Represent Powerful Opportunities to Improve Care of Older Adults

, which traditionally receive funding through federal grants funded as part of the Older Americans Act. Unfortunately, the Older Americans Act remains unauthorized and severely underfunded. Changing payment and delivery mechanisms, including the rise of managed care, have provided an opportunity. Community-based organizations can create new sustainable revenue streams in partnership with health systems and plans, enabling more older people to access these services. We had already invested (...) Three New Grants Totaling $6.7 Million Represent Powerful Opportunities to Improve Care of Older Adults Three New Grants Totaling $6.7 Million Represent Powerful Opportunities to Improve Care of Older Adults Contact JAHF Tel: Fax: The John A. Hartford Foundation 55 East 59th Street 16th Floor New York, NY 10022-1713 / / on March 16, 2016 ’s dedicated staff is constantly monitoring the dynamic health care landscape to identify powerful opportunities for large-scale change that will result

2016 Health AGEnda blog

291. Science News » NIMH Training Grant Recipient Wins Research Prize

Science News » NIMH Training Grant Recipient Wins Research Prize NIMH » NIMH Training Grant Recipient Wins Research Prize Mental Health Information Outreach Research Funding News & Events About Us Transforming the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses. Search the NIMH Website: > > > Recent News March 26, 2019 March 19, 2019 March 13, 2019 March 11, 2019 February 20, 2019 News by Year News by Topic Disorders Populations Prevention Research Other Menu Recent News March 26, 2019 March 19 (...) , 2019 March 13, 2019 March 11, 2019 February 20, 2019 News by Year News by Topic Disorders Populations Prevention Research Other . Science, a peer-reviewed journal published by the (AAAS), and (SciLifeLab), a Swedish national center for molecular biosciences, created the prize to encourage young scientists as they begin their careers. An describes the work honored, in which Eshel combined techniques, including activating and monitoring neuronal activity, to reveal details of how specific cells

2016 NIMH blog

292. P60 Program Project Grant-Outreach for Smoke-Free Homes

P60 Program Project Grant-Outreach for Smoke-Free Homes P60 Program Project Grant-Outreach for Smoke-Free Homes - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. P60 Program Project Grant-Outreach for Smoke (...) of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Smoking is widely accepted to cause an increase in an individual's likelihood of developing cancer and heart disease. The effects of tobacco smoke are not limited to smokers. Secondhand smoke inhaled by a non-smoker has also been associated with the development of several illnesses. This study focuses on learning how to make your home smoke-free. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase

2012 Clinical Trials

293. Research to reality: a process evaluation of a mini-grants program to disseminate evidence-based nutrition programs to rural churches and worksites. (Abstract)

Research to reality: a process evaluation of a mini-grants program to disseminate evidence-based nutrition programs to rural churches and worksites. To describe a project that used mini-grants plus technical assistance to disseminate evidence-based programs, to understand how the project worked in different settings, and to generate recommendations for future programming and evaluation.Process evaluation using program records, activity forms completed by grantees, interviews, and focus (...) assistance from Emory and agreed to conduct all required elements of the evidence-based program.We assessed adoption, reach, implementation, and maintenance of specific programs and their core elements, as well as contextual influences and the resources required to implement the mini-grants program.Four of the 7 funded organizations conducted all programmatic core elements; all 7 sites conducted at least 6 of 8 core elements, including at least 1 food-related policy or environmental change as a result

2012 Journal of Public Health Management and Practice

294. Writing implementation research grant proposals: Ten key ingredients. Full Text available with Trip Pro

complex and multilevel processes, many investigators may not feel equipped to write competitive proposals, and this concern is pronounced among early stage implementation researchers.This article addresses the challenges of preparing grant applications that succeed in the emerging field of dissemination and implementation. We summarize ten ingredients that are important in implementation research grants. For each, we provide examples of how preliminary data, background literature, and narrative detail (...) Writing implementation research grant proposals: Ten key ingredients. All investigators seeking funding to conduct implementation research face the challenges of preparing a high-quality proposal and demonstrating their capacity to conduct the proposed study. Applicants need to demonstrate the progressive nature of their research agenda and their ability to build cumulatively upon the literature and their own preliminary studies. Because implementation science is an emerging field involving

2012 Implementation Science

295. Five New Grants Totaling $6.7 Million Will Improve Care of Older Adults

by these passionate clinicians and a pilot to help EDs implement quality improvement projects based on those guidelines. This two-year, first phase will also study the impact of guideline recommended care, set up an infrastructure for ongoing data collection and research, and develop a business plan for the expansion of the collaborative to 50 hospitals in a second grant-funded phase before becoming self-sustaining. In another exciting and collaborative project, we will be taking lessons learned from the highly (...) Five New Grants Totaling $6.7 Million Will Improve Care of Older Adults Five New Grants Totaling $6.7 Million Will Improve Care of Older Adults Contact JAHF Tel: Fax: The John A. Hartford Foundation 55 East 59th Street 16th Floor New York, NY 10022-1713 / / on December 16, 2015 , our grantees, and colleagues who are all working to improve the care of older adults! We have so much to celebrate that has already been accomplished and the momentum going forward is palpable. I am pleased to let you

2015 Health AGEnda blog

296. New Grants Totaling $3.28 Million Spur Long-Term Changes in Delivery of Care to Older Adults

performance measures for health plans focused on the outcomes older adults identify as important. These measures will be designed for eventual use in NCQA accreditation programs, and by states and CMS. Together, these projects will meet the need for quality measures that assess how well organizations provide integrated, patient-centered, goal-based care that helps people to achieve their priority outcomes. Finally, the Board also approved a three-year, grant of a little over $515,000 to continue support (...) New Grants Totaling $3.28 Million Spur Long-Term Changes in Delivery of Care to Older Adults New Grants Totaling $3.28 Million Spur Long-Term Changes in Delivery of Care to Older Adults Contact JAHF Tel: Fax: The John A. Hartford Foundation 55 East 59th Street 16th Floor New York, NY 10022-1713 / / on September 24, 2015 approved three grants totaling more than $3.28 million last week that we believe will lead to fundamental, long-term changes in the way care is delivered to older adults. We

2015 Health AGEnda blog

297. NLM Medical Library Resource Improvement Grant Program: an evaluation. Full Text available with Trip Pro

NLM Medical Library Resource Improvement Grant Program: an evaluation. The Extramural Programs, NLM, undertook a staff study to evaluate the Medical Library Resource Improvement Grant Program in order to determine impact on hospital library development and to assess factors significant to regional medical library (RML) network development. Initiated in fiscal year 1971, the improvement grant program provides one-year, one-time grant awards of a maximum of $3,000 to assist in establishing (...) a basic collection of books, journals, and other health science information resources for community hospitals and comparable health facilities. Applicants who received grant awards were compared to applicants who did not receive awards and to nonapplicants, using nine dependent variables, four independent variables, and responses to an RML questionnaire. Results show that the applicants who received awards outperformed the other groups, and that the improvement grant program has been successful

1976 Bulletin of the Medical Library Association

298. Tell me now how do I feel

Tell me now how do I feel Tell me now how do I feel – Bad Science Search TED Talk Collected Journalism This Nerdy Book This Great Book T-shirts Categories (3) (4) (6) (45) (28) (6) (16) (190) (5) (20) (52) (88) (2) (1) (2) (1) (677) (4) (14) (2) (37) (4) (9) (3) (11) (6) (3) (16) (13) (1) (6) (8) (6) (6) (3) (13) (2) (2) (27) (1) (2) (6) (1) (7) (8) (3) (1) (4) (12) (1) (3) (20) (2) (13) (1) (20) (15) (4) (1) (20) (1) (1) (1) (1) (3) (25) (2) (2) (4) (2) (1) (9) (6) (6) (2) (4) (2) (1) (1) (5 (...) ) (1) January 22nd, 2011 by Ben Goldacre in , , , | Ben Goldacre, The Guardian, Saturday 22 January 2011 I’m not going to tell the same story once a year, like some kind of journalistic dirty protest, even if it crops up in parliament, every newspaper, and all over Radio 4: there are more interesting things to say than “Blue Monday is bullshit”, but before we get there, let me briefly clarify how Blue Monday is definitely bullshit. The “most depressing day of the year” began life as a “wacky

2011 Bad Science

299. How to publish as a medical trainee

How to publish as a medical trainee How to publish as a medical trainee How to publish as a medical trainee | | February 22, 2017 63 Shares With all this talk about , I thought we might take a break to discuss the small delights that sprinkle throughout medical training. This is not a “You should publish as a trainee” manifesto. It’s more of a DIY guide for those who are interested but can’t find the time or the mentor. And after a decade of rejected manuscripts, unfortunately, I’ve got plenty (...) to say on the matter. Problem 1: “I don’t have enough time.” Not only is medical training physically, mentally, and socially grueling, it feeds on the hours of your day and the days of your week. In working with medical educators and trainees, the most common problem cited by trainees is their lack of time. And this doesn’t get any easier once you . So how can I encourage you to conduct research or write papers while you battle this time vacuum called medical training? The secret is, you don’t have

2017 KevinMD blog

300. Make more than your spouse? Here’s how to save money on taxes.

tax donation on our contribution, yet grant funding over time. Depending on the snowball that life sometimes throws at us, it might be beneficial to consider filing taxes separately. While this has not applied to us, if your lower earning spouse incurs high medical or work-related expenses a particular year, it might be worthwhile filing your taxes separately. You can only take the deduction for such expenses if it amounts to greater than two percent of income, filing separately will lower (...) Make more than your spouse? Here’s how to save money on taxes. Make more than your spouse? Here's how to save money on taxes. Make more than your spouse? Here’s how to save money on taxes. | | November 30, 2017 73 Shares The only time my husband outearned me was during our first three years of marriage when I was still in residency and working 80-plus hours per week earning less than minimum wage per hour. Since then, despite graduating in a professional degree, we have made relocation moves

2017 KevinMD blog

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