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1. Are penicillin allergies fake news?

Are penicillin allergies fake news? Are penicillin allergies fake news? Are penicillin allergies fake news? | | January 31, 2019 52 Shares Penicillin allergies are fake news. More than 95 percent of people with penicillin allergies are not allergic. A highlighted the opportunity anethesiologists have in helping evaluate beta-lactam allergies, in particular to cephalosporins. The author was correct, these allergies are common and usually not real. Unfortunately, premedication with antihistamines (...) studying this problem so that we can safely give our tiny patients access to a lifetime of narrow-spectrum but extremely effective antibiotics. One day we may be able to have better diagnostic tools to confirm that the rash is just due to a virus. And that will be not fake news, but news we can all look forward to. is a pediatric allergist. Image credit: … … 52 Shares Tagged as: Subscribe to KevinMD and never miss a story! Get free updates delivered free to your inbox. Subscribe Hire KevinMD to keynote

2019 KevinMD blog

2. Information-theoretic models of deception: Modelling cooperation and diffusion in populations exposed to "fake news". (PubMed)

Information-theoretic models of deception: Modelling cooperation and diffusion in populations exposed to "fake news". The modelling of deceptions in game theory and decision theory has not been well studied, despite the increasing importance of this problem in social media, public discourse, and organisational management. This paper presents an improved formulation of the extant information-theoretic models of deceptions, a framework for incorporating these models of deception into game (...) and decision theoretic models of deception, and applies these models and this framework in an agent based evolutionary simulation that models two very common deception types employed in "fake news" attacks. The simulation results for both deception types modelled show, as observed empirically in many social systems subjected to "fake news" attacks, that even a very small population of deceivers that transiently invades a much larger population of non-deceiving agents can strongly alter the equilibrium

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2018 PLoS ONE

3. "Fake News" in Urology: Evaluating the Accuracy of Articles Shared on Social Media in Genitourinary Malignancies. (PubMed)

"Fake News" in Urology: Evaluating the Accuracy of Articles Shared on Social Media in Genitourinary Malignancies. To evaluate the accuracy of the most popular articles on social media platforms pertaining to genitourinary malignancies, and identify the prevalence of misinformation available to patients.The ten most-shared articles on popular social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Reddit) were identified for prostate cancer, bladder cancer, kidney cancer, testis cancer

2019 BJU international

4. Fake news and dental education. (PubMed)

Fake news and dental education. Fake news is used to spread disinformation on many subjects with the aim of distorting the truth. There has been a rise of fake news stories in dentistry such as homemade whitening products and misinformed information on how to strengthen your teeth. Such stories populate YouTube and other social media. Evidence-based dentistry does not provide all the answers, so patients and health professions readily seek out information that confirms their own views (...) on the subject. There are tools available that may be used to verify the accuracy of such information and help to dispel fake news. The ideal way to deal with the influence of fake news is to empower individuals to publish and create an environment of 'real news'.

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2019 British Dental Journal

5. Antivaxers on Twitter: Fake news and Twitter bots

Antivaxers on Twitter: Fake news and Twitter bots Antivaxers on Twitter: Fake news and Twitter bots - RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE March 27, 2019 March 25, 2019 March 22, 2019 March 20, 2019 March 19, 2019 March 18, 2019 squirrelelite on Derek Freyberg on on squirrelelite on brian on ChristineRose on Athaic on Anthony on Eric Lund on Denice Walter on squirrelelite on Search and explore Browse "A statement of fact cannot be insolent." The miscellaneous ramblings of a surgeon/scientist on medicine (...) , quackery, science, and pseudoscience (and anything else that interests him). Antivaxers on Twitter: Fake news and Twitter bots Two years ago, I that demonstrated how the antivaccine movement had learned to use Twitter to amplify their antiscience message. At the time, I noted how in 2014, when the whole “CDC whistleblower” conspiracy theory was first hatched, antivaxers were so bad at Twitter, so obvious, so naive. The Tweeted inane claims at government officials, scientists, legislators, and whoever

2017 Respectful Insolence

6. A case study in fake news: Did the FBI raid the CDC based on the CDC whistleblower’s allegations?

A case study in fake news: Did the FBI raid the CDC based on the CDC whistleblower’s allegations? A case study in fake news: Did the FBI raid the CDC based on the CDC whistleblower's allegations? | ScienceBlogs Advertisment Search Search Toggle navigation Main navigation A case study in fake news: Did the FBI raid the CDC based on the CDC whistleblower's allegations? By on January 23, 2017. [ Note: The proprietor of the website has responded by e-mail. See Comment #37 .] Now that the unreal has (...) become real, I was just thinking how weird it is that I've never actually blogged about a phenomenon that directly contributed to the election of Donald Trump. I'm referring to the phenomenon known now as "fake news." Now, by "fake news," I do not mean sloppy reporting. I do not mean biased reporting. I do not even mean a type of article that many crank websites publish in which a real news story (often with other news stories) is used as jumping-off point for pseudoscience and conspiracy theories

2017 Respectful Insolence

7. Antivaxers on Twitter: Fake news and Twitter bots

Antivaxers on Twitter: Fake news and Twitter bots Antivaxers on Twitter: Fake news and Twitter bots | ScienceBlogs Advertisment Search Search Toggle navigation Main navigation Antivaxers on Twitter: Fake news and Twitter bots By on September 28, 2017. Two years ago, I that demonstrated how the antivaccine movement had learned to use Twitter to amplify their antiscience message. At the time, I noted how in 2014, when the whole "CDC whistleblower" conspiracy theory was first hatched, antivaxers (...) to school vaccine mandates. All of this was before the 2016 election, even before Donald Trump came gliding down the escalator at Trump Tower to announce his candidacy for the Republican nomination for President. It was right around the time that fake news was beginning to be appreciated as the huge problem that it ultimately became. More importantly, it was long before it became appreciated how Twitter bots and hordes of Twitter trolls were engaged in an active effort to , and how Facebook

2017 Respectful Insolence

8. Fake news: is smoking really increasing in Australia?

Fake news: is smoking really increasing in Australia? Fake news: is smoking really increasing in Australia? | Blog - Tobacco Control by Author: Simon Chapman AO This blog post originally appeared on and is published here with permission. ON 14 August, 2017, The Australian newspaper ran a guaranteed to go viral. The headline screamed: “More smokers lighting up, despite the costs”. The journalist, Adam Creighton, who has, grotesquely, written about tobacco control being like , reported on a claim (...) widely across Australian media, with Dr Mendelsohn interviewed several times. Senator David Leyonhjelm issued a repeating the claim, which would have pleased his party’s . I received enquiries from the US and England asking me if the claims were true. I immediately called fake news. Here’s the real story. The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) surveys national smoking prevalence every 3 years as part of its National Drug Strategy Household Survey. We also have annual data from

2017 BMJ Tobacco Control Blog

9. Food Evolution documentary looks at science, money, and fake news around GMOs

Food Evolution documentary looks at science, money, and fake news around GMOs Food Evolution documentary looks at science, money, and fake news around GMOs | PLOS Blogs Network PLOS Blogs Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Diverse perspectives on science and medicine Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary (...) Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Post navigation in Uncategorized Food Evolution aims to take a look at the science underlying the heated rhetoric of the GMO debate. Filmmaker Scott Hamilton Kennedy, narrator Neil deGrasse Tyson and on-camera experts walk through the major claims and key figures. While the documentary tries to communicate the science, it realizes that the GMO debate isn’t just about the science. It’s about financial interests, fear, and fake news. Follow

2017 PLOS Blogs Network

10. Teaching critical thinking to combat fake news and bullshit: You have to start young

Teaching critical thinking to combat fake news and bullshit: You have to start young Teaching critical thinking to combat fake news and bullshit: You have to start young | ScienceBlogs Advertisment Search Search Toggle navigation Main navigation Teaching critical thinking to combat fake news and bullshit: You have to start young By on May 22, 2017. As much as I like to deconstruct pseudoscientific claims, particularly about health, medicine, and health care, Sometimes it gets a bit draining (...) . There's just so much pseudoscience, so much credulity, so much sheer idiocy out there that trying to refute them and encourage a more skeptical mindset often feels like pissing into the ocean, for all the effect it has. In the age of fake news and Donald Trump, it even feels as though we're going backward—and not slowly, either. That's why I felt it was time for a bit of a break, a bit more optimism than I've been able to muster before. So it was a good thing that I happened across an article by Julia

2017 Respectful Insolence

11. The New York Times publishes fake news false hope in the form of a credulous account of dubious alternative medicine testimonials

The New York Times publishes fake news false hope in the form of a credulous account of dubious alternative medicine testimonials The New York Times publishes fake news false hope in the form of a credulous account of dubious alternative medicine testimonials | ScienceBlogs Advertisment Search Search Toggle navigation Main navigation The New York Times publishes fake news false hope in the form of a credulous account of dubious alternative medicine testimonials By on May 3, 2017. [ Editor's

2017 Respectful Insolence

12. It’s a strange world, after all: Orac vs. The Shat and fake news over…Autism Speaks?

It’s a strange world, after all: Orac vs. The Shat and fake news over…Autism Speaks? It's a strange world, after all: Orac vs. The Shat and fake news over...Autism Speaks? | ScienceBlogs Advertisment Search Search Toggle navigation Main navigation It's a strange world, after all: Orac vs. The Shat and fake news over...Autism Speaks? By on April 6, 2017. It's a strange world after all, and I'll show you why. Last night, as I deposited myself on my couch with my laptop sitting on my lap (...) other followers. (It turns out that a significant percentage of my Twitter followers also follow William Shatner. Who could have predicted that, other than everyone?) People pointed out who I am and how TruthWiki is a conspiracy mongering fake news site, but Shatner doubled down and posted links to NewsTarget and NaturalNews, and, as bad, Age of Autism: I sent 2 other sites: are those also fake news sites?? How about this-2010: 12 hours ago: — William Shatner (@WilliamShatner) People explained

2017 Respectful Insolence

13. ‘Fake breakthrough, fake news:’ One physician-researcher’s takeaway on news coverage of MS drug Ocrevus

‘Fake breakthrough, fake news:’ One physician-researcher’s takeaway on news coverage of MS drug Ocrevus ‘Fake breakthrough, fake news:’ One physician-researcher’s takeaway on news coverage of MS drug Ocrevus - HealthNewsReview.org Note to our followers: Our nearly 13-year run of daily publication of new content on HealthNewsReview.org came to a close at the end of 2018. Publisher Gary Schwitzer and other contributors may post new articles periodically. But all of the 6,000+ articles we have (...) published contain lessons to help you improve your critical thinking about health care interventions. And those will be still be alive on the site for a couple of years. 6093 Posts Menu April 3, 2017 ‘Fake breakthrough, fake news:’ One physician-researcher’s takeaway on news coverage of MS drug Ocrevus Posted By Categories , , , Tags , , Joy Victory is deputy managing editor of HealthNewsReview.org. She tweets as @thejoyvictory. The biggest health news of last week was undoubtedly the FDA approval

2017 HealthNewsReview

14. More fake news: No, the Trump administration is not going to remove all vaccine-related information from the CDC website, but that doesn’t mean science advocates shouldn’t worry

More fake news: No, the Trump administration is not going to remove all vaccine-related information from the CDC website, but that doesn’t mean science advocates shouldn’t worry More fake news: No, the Trump administration is not going to remove all vaccine-related information from the CDC website, but that doesn't mean science advocates shouldn't worry | ScienceBlogs Advertisment Search Search Toggle navigation Main navigation More fake news: No, the Trump administration is not going to remove (...) at one thing that probably doesn't rate a full heapin' helpin' of not-so-Respectful Insolence but that I'd like to take note of anyway. It's a bit of fake news that's been making the rounds similar to the that claimed that the FBI had raided the headquarters of the CDC in Atlanta in the middle of the night, accompanied by the " ." Naturally, the graduates of the Dunning-Kruger School of Science over at Sherri Tenpenny's antivaccine website Truthkings fell for it, hook, line, and (almost) sinker

2017 Respectful Insolence

15. Fake News or Weak Science? Visibility and Characterization of Antivaccine Webpages Returned by Google in Different Languages and Countries (PubMed)

Fake News or Weak Science? Visibility and Characterization of Antivaccine Webpages Returned by Google in Different Languages and Countries The 1998 Lancet paper by Wakefield et al., despite subsequent retraction and evidence indicating no causal link between vaccinations and autism, triggered significant parental concern. The aim of this study was to analyze the online information available on this topic. Using localized versions of Google, we searched "autism vaccine" in English, French

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2018 Frontiers in immunology

16. Fake News, Alternative Facts, and Things That Just Are Not True: Can Science Survive the Post-Truth Era? (PubMed)

Fake News, Alternative Facts, and Things That Just Are Not True: Can Science Survive the Post-Truth Era? 30175281 2018 11 14 2452-302X 3 4 2018 Aug JACC. Basic to translational science JACC Basic Transl Sci Fake News, Alternative Facts, and Things That Just Are Not True: Can Science Survive the Post-Truth Era? 573-574 10.1016/j.jacbts.2018.06.003 Mann Douglas L DL eng Editorial 2018 08 28 United States JACC Basic Transl Sci 101677259 2452-302X 2018 9 4 6 0 2018 9 4 6 0 2018 9 4 6 1 epublish

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2018 JACC: Basic to Translational Science

17. Fighting the good fight: the fallout of fake news in infection prevention and why context matters. (PubMed)

Fighting the good fight: the fallout of fake news in infection prevention and why context matters. Although misinformation has always existed, the scope and speed at which fake news can reach even the most remote corners of the globe is a modern phenomenon. In the field of infection prevention and control (IPC), we like to believe that our dedication to the field and the process of conducting science protects us from the ravages of 'bad buzz' and fake news. This misconception leads medical (...) -conducted study can be distorted to make people believe something fallacious. In the current system of publishing and the proliferation of online journals that publish without peer review, 'bad buzz' and fake news can quickly do a good deal of damage.Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

2018 Journal of Hospital Infection

18. The benefits of antidepressants: news or fake news? (PubMed)

The benefits of antidepressants: news or fake news? SummaryAlthough antidepressant drugs are commonly effective, several meta-analyses of antidepressant drug trials undertaken decades after their introduction suggested that they were effectively acting as placebos. A recent meta-analysis concluded that they were effective. Both conclusions have been widely taken up by the media. This paper seeks to explain the disconnect.Declaration of interestNone.

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2018 British Journal of Psychiatry

19. Adverse effects of proton pump inhibitors: fact or fake news? (PubMed)

Adverse effects of proton pump inhibitors: fact or fake news? The present review summarizes the past year's literature, both clinical and basic science, regarding potential adverse effects of proton pump inhibitors.Proton pump inhibitors are amongst the most widely prescribed and overprescribed medications worldwide. Although generally considered well tolerated, epidemiologic studies mining large databases have reported a panoply of purported serious adverse effects associated with proton pump (...) inhibitors, including chronic kidney disease, cognitive decline, myocardial infarction, stroke, bone fracture and even death. It should be noted that the quality of the evidence underlying these associations is very low and these studies, by design, cannot ascribe cause and effect. Nonetheless, these associations have been sensationalized in the media and misinterpreted by patients and providers. Unintended consequences of the fake news are that patients are not being prescribed and/or taking clinical

2018 Current opinion in gastroenterology

20. Preventing sensationalistic science and fake news about substance use (PubMed)

Preventing sensationalistic science and fake news about substance use 29530066 2018 11 16 2018 11 16 1747-597X 13 1 2018 03 12 Substance abuse treatment, prevention, and policy Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy Preventing sensationalistic science and fake news about substance use. 11 10.1186/s13011-018-0148-3 Arndt Stephan S Iowa Consortium for Substance Abuse Research and Evaluation, University of Iowa, 100 MTP4, Iowa City, IA, 52245-5000, USA. stephan-arndt@uiowa.edu. Department of Psychiatry

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2018 Substance abuse treatment, prevention, and policy

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