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Learning Disabilities

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1. Learning disabilities: Scenario: Suspected learning disability

, speech and language therapists, educational staff, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, physicians, paediatricians, and pharmacists. Additionally: Referral to a clinical psychologist may be necessary if the person requires assessment for purposes such as accessing benefits, determining mental capacity, and/or determining fitness to plead within the criminal justice system. Note: this can be a direct referral or may be made via the community learning disability service/team depending on urgency (...) Learning disabilities: Scenario: Suspected learning disability Scenario: Suspected learning disability | Management | Learning disabilities | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Scenario: Suspected learning disability Learning disabilities: Scenario: Suspected learning disability Last revised in October 2018 Scenario: Suspected learning disability From age 1 month onwards. How should I manage a person with a suspected learning disability? Note: Where a learning disability is suspected assess

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

2. Learning disabilities: When should I suspect a learning disability?

Learning disabilities: When should I suspect a learning disability? Diagnosis | Diagnosis | Learning disabilities | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Diagnosis Learning disabilities: When should I suspect a learning disability? Last revised in October 2018 When should I suspect a learning disability? Where a learning disability is suspected, assess the person's t o make decisions throughout assessment, care, and treatment on a decision-by-decision basis. In practice, most people with learning (...) disabilities seen in primary care will have already received a specialist diagnosis. This may be based on neurodevelopmental assessment, and/or on a pre-existing condition for which some degree of learning disability is a component (such as Down's syndrome). In rare cases, children or adults may present in primary care with a suspected learning disability. In such cases: Take a history, bearing in mind the person's communication needs and level of understanding. Wherever possible/appropriate, speak

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

3. Learning disabilities: Scenario: Confirmed learning disability

Learning disabilities: Scenario: Confirmed learning disability Scenario: Confirmed learning disability | Management | Learning disabilities | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Scenario: Confirmed learning disability Learning disabilities: Scenario: Confirmed learning disability Last revised in October 2018 Scenario: Confirmed learning disability From age 1 month onwards. How should I manage a person with a confirmed learning disability? Note: When managing a person with a learning disability (...) , evaluate their to make decisions throughout assessment, care, and treatment on a decision-by-decision basis, and be mindful of their . Primary care practitioners should regularly review the communication needs of people with learning disabilities as they grow older to find out if they have changed. People with a confirmed learning disability are likely to receive care via a local multidisciplinary learning disability support service/team, who (depending on local availability) may be involved

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

4. Challenging behaviour and learning disabilities: prevention and interventions for people with learning disabilities whose behaviour challenges

with the criminal justice system. It is relatively common for people with a learning disability to develop behaviour that challenges, and more common for people with more severe disability. Prevalence rates are around 5–15% in educational, health or social care services for people with a learning disability. Rates are higher in teenagers and people in their early 20s, and in particular settings (for example, 30–40% in hospital settings). People with a learning disability who also have communication difficulties (...) of the extent and severity of the behaviour that challenges provide skills training and emotional support, or information about these, to help them take part in and support interventions for the person with a learning disability and behaviour that challenges. Early identification of the emergence of behaviour that challenges Everyone involved in caring for and supporting children, young people and adults with a learning disability (including family members and carers) should understand the risk of behaviour

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

5. Care and support of people growing older with learning disabilities

in the person's daily life. 1.6.9 Social care providers should work in partnership with healthcare providers to share knowledge about the person and to develop expertise for end of life care. Care and support of people growing older with learning disabilities (NG96) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 27 of 381.6.10 Provide training, information and support for family members and carers, for example, in medication (...) , including older people's services, adult learning disability services, employment, education and criminal justice services People with learning disabilities, their families, carers and advocates Care and support of people growing older with learning disabilities (NG96) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 4 of 38Conte Context xt People with learning disabilities are now living significantly longer

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

6. Learning disabilities and behaviour that challenges: service design and delivery

with a learning disability and behaviour that challenges Providers of related services, including housing, education, employment and criminal justice services Practitioners working with children, young people and adults with a learning disability and behaviour that challenges in other services or settings, including education, housing, voluntary and community services, employment and criminal justice services Children, young people and adults with a learning disability and behaviour that challenges (...) on the principle that children, young people and adults with a learning disability and behaviour that challenges should have the support they need to live where and how they want. It will help local areas shift their focus towards prevention and early intervention, enabling children, young people and adults to live in their communities, and increasing support for families and carers. This should reduce the need for people to move away from their home or community for care, education or treatment. The guideline

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

7. Covid-19: Management of patients with a learning disability, autism or both

response in hospitals. We may also need to work outside our specific areas of training and expertise and the General Medical Council (GMC) has already indicated its support for this in the exceptional circumstances we may face: www.gmc-uk.org/news/news-archive/how-we-will-continue-to-regulate-in-light-of- novel-coronavirus As a clinician working in other fields you may have had limited clinical contact with people with a learning disability or people with autism, however in 2018/19 at least 41 (...) Covid-19: Management of patients with a learning disability, autism or both Publications approval reference: 001559 NHS England and NHS Improvement Speciality guides for patient management during the coronavirus pandemic Clinical guide for front line staff to support the management of patients with a learning disability, autism or both during the coronavirus pandemic – relevant to all clinical specialities 24 March 2020 Version 1 “…and there are no more surgeons, urologists, orthopaedists, we

2020 Covid-19 Ad hoc guidelines

8. Alcohol interventions in secondary and further education

education. 1.1.4 When planning alcohol education: ensure it is appropriate for age and maturity and aims to minimise the risk of any unintended adverse consequences (see recommendation 1.2.1). tailor it to take account of each pupil's learning needs and abilities tailor it to the group's knowledge and perceptions of alcohol and alcohol use take into account that those aged 18 and over can legally buy alcohol. 1.1.5 Think about how to adapt alcohol education for pupils with special educational needs (...) and disabilities so that it is tailored to the pupil's learning needs, abilities and maturity (see chapter 6 of the Department for Education's SEND code of practice: 0 to 25 years). T o find out why the committee made the recommendations on planning alcohol education content and how they might affect practice, see rationale and impact. Confidentiality and safeguarding Confidentiality and safeguarding 1.1.6 Ensure all involved in giving the alcohol education sessions are aware of the school's process

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

9. Dignity in health care for people with learning disabilities

Dignity in health care for people with learning disabilities Dignity in health care for people with learning disabilities | Royal College of Nursing arrow_up-blue blog branches consultations events facebook-icon facebook-icon2 factsheet forum-icon forum hands key link location lock mail measure menu_plus news pdf pdf2 phone policies publications related search share subjectguide twitter-icon word instagram-icon youtube-icon We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our (...) website. Continue submit Membership Employment & Pay Professional Development Clinical Get Involved Get Help News & Events About Quick links × × × × × × × × × submit Dignity in health care for people with learning disabilities You are here: / / / Dignity in health care for people with learning disabilities Published: 18/12/2017 Publication code: 006605 Please select This guidance, developed by the Royal College of Nursing Learning Disability Nursing Forum, aims to improve dignity in health care

2018 Royal College of Nursing

10. Sexuality Education for Children and Adolescents

school (38% of male teenagers, compared with 47% of female teenagers). Teacher training in the United States is quite variable from district to district and school to school especially in sexuality education. The FoSE Initiative has released the National Teacher Preparation Standards for Sexuality Education to provide guidance to institutions of higher education to better prepare future teachers. The FoSE teacher standards include professional disposition, diversity and equity, content knowledge (...) , legal and professional ethics, planning, implementation, and assessment. According to these standards, teachers may benefit from receiving specialized training on human sexuality, which includes accurate and current knowledge about biological, social, and emotional stages of child and adolescent sexual development (including sexual orientation) and legal aspects of sexuality (ie, age of consent). Professionals responsible for sexuality education may benefit from receiving training in several

2020 American Academy of Pediatrics

11. Learning disabilities

Learning disabilities Learning disabilities | Topics A to Z | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Learning disabilities Learning disabilities Last revised in October 2018 Lower intellectual ability and social functioning < age 18 Diagnosis Management Background information Learning disabilities: Summary Definitions of learning disability generally encompass three core components: Lower intellectual ability (usually an IQ of less than 70). Significant impairment of social or adaptive functioning. Onset (...) in childhood. People with milder learning disabilities may be able to live independently and care for themselves, manage everyday tasks, work in paid employment, communicate their needs and wishes, have some language skills, and may have additional needs that are not clear to people who do not know them well. People with more severe learning disabilities are more likely to need support with daily activities such as dressing, washing, food preparation, and keeping themselves safe, have limited or no verbal

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

12. Learning disabilities: Scenario: Behaviour that challenges and mental health problems

disabilities. Parent training programmes specifically designed for parents or carers of children with learning disabilities can be considered to help prevent or treat mental health problems in the child, and to support carer wellbeing. The nature, content, and delivery of any interventions should be adjusted to take into account the impact of the person's learning disability and 'behaviour that challenges'. Ensure that the person understands the purpose, plan and content of any intervention before (...) it starts, and regularly throughout. If prescribing medication: Be aware that only primary care practitioners with training/expertise in the care of people with a learning disability should initiate treatment with psychotropic drugs. Additionally, specialists with expertise in treating mental health problems in people with learning disabilities should start medication in adults with more severe learning disabilities (unless there are locally agreed protocols for shared care) and children and young

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

13. RCN position statement: The role of school nurses in providing emergency contraception services in education settings

is necessary as the role of school nurses has extended to provide emergency contraception and advice on sexual health to school-age students in education settings, following OFSTED’s report on sex and relationship education in schools (2006). The RCN position The RCN believes that school nurses with appropriate training and experience are able to assess the need for hormonal emergency contraception, and to supply this contraception using patient group directions (PGDs). In addition, school nurses should (...) contraception through the provision of education and advice’. These advice services are usually staffed by experienced school nurses or sexual health nurses. Equipped with the appropriate training and experience, they have acquired the skills necessary to assess the need for emergency contraception, provide sexual health advice and appropriate onward referral for follow-up, and to supply emergency contraception under PGDs. Sexual health nurses in school-based settings work alongside the named school nurse

2018 Royal College of Nursing

14. Mental health problems in people with learning disabilities: prevention, assessment and management

and risk management helps services communicate with the person and their family members, carers or care workers (as appropriate) clearly and promptly, in a format and language suited to the person's needs and preferences monitors the implementation of the care plan and its outcomes. Staff tr Staff training and supervision aining and supervision 1.2.9 Health, social care and education services should train all staff who may come into contact with people with learning disabilities to be aware (...) in people with learning disabilities: prevention, assessment and management (NG54) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 38This guideline is the basis of QS142. Ov Overview erview This guideline covers preventing, assessing and managing mental health problems in people with learning disabilities in all settings (including health, social care, education, and forensic and criminal justice). It aims

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

15. Educational inclusion, equal opportunities and education provision

1.1 An inclusive school (or other education setting) expects all children or students within its community to be educated together. It sees the diverse needs of children and students as a rich vein of opportunity to develop its approaches to teaching and learning and thereby achieve excellence for all learners. 1.2 Inclusion is not a placement issue. It is about children belonging to a community. In the case of education, this community can be a school, college or early years setting. 1.3 (...) their confidence and self esteem g) be able to participate in all aspects of school life alongside their peers h) be supported in reaching their full educational potential. 20161105 Education inclusion of deaf children position statement – ED PaC 2 of 4 2. Policy on equal educational opportunities for deaf children 2.1 NDCS will work to influence and challenge decision-makers so that: a) deaf children and young people are not treated less favourably on the grounds of their disability b) policies, plans

2016 National Deaf Children's Society

16. Evidence for Therapeutic Patient Education Interventions to Promote Cardiovascular Patient Self-Management: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association (Full text)

education delivered by RN × 6 wk Monthly BP feedback with phone calls by bilingual community health workers 12 mo Improvements at 18 mo Self-efficacy for BP control (P =0.001) HBP knowledge (P=0.001) Depression (P=0.04) Medication adherence (P=0.06) McManus et al 38 (2010) RCT N=527 I=263 C=264 Self-management intervention including: BP self-monitoring Self-titration of drugs Telemonitoring of BP 2 Training sessions provided by research team for intervention group 12 mo Reduced SBP (P=0.0004) Increased (...) in intervention group Improved self-efficacy (P=0.0026), knowledge (P=0.001), and self-care behavior (P=0.001) in intervention group DeWalt et al 71 (2012) RCT comparative effectiveness N=605 I=303 C=302 Clinic UC=Single-session literacy- sensitive training education I=Multisession literacy- sensitive training + F/U 1:1 In-person 40-min verbal instruction by health educator and 5–8 10-min phone calls and printed educational materials 12 mo NS difference in hospitalization or mortality by group (single session

2017 American Heart Association PubMed abstract

17. Comprehensive Sexuality Education

of their peers without disabilities. Their knowledge of anatomy and development, sexuality, contraception, and STIs (including HIV), should be on par with their peers, and they should be included in sexuality programs through their schools and communities. Comprehensive sexuality education should not marginalize lesbian, gay, bisexual, questioning, and transgender individuals and those that have variations in sexual development (eg, primary ovarian insufficiency, müllerian anomalies). Curricula (...) the rates of sexual activity, sexual risk behaviors (eg, number of partners and unprotected intercourse), sexually transmitted infections, and adolescent pregnancy. One key component of an effective program is encouraging community-centered efforts. In addition to counseling and service provision to individual adolescent patients, obstetrician–gynecologists can serve parents and communities by supporting and assisting sexuality education. Because of their knowledge, experience, and awareness

2016 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

18. Clinical Guidelines and Integrated Care Pathways for the Oral Health Care of People with Learning Disabilities

addressed a local MENCAP meeting. Given this importance, it is amazing that so much is left to chance and geographical location. General training in hygiene and access to dental hygienists, nurses, dentists and anaesthetic teams, who have the specialist knowledge, skills and experience is variable. Some primary care and hospital trust executives and managers fail to understand and cater for the special needs of people with a learning disability, and their families. The care that parents provide (...) Commissioning 55 5.3 World Class Commissioning 56 5.4 Mapping the Baseline 56 5.5 Developing the Vision 58 5.6 Making it Happen 59 5.7 Commissioning more than Dental treatment 59 5.8 Provision of Oral Health Promotion Services 60 5.9 Social Services Involvement with People with Learning Disabilities 61 Clinical Guidelines and Integrated Care Pathways for the Oral Health Care of People with Learning Disabilities 2012 i6Education and training 65 6.1 Training for Dentists 65 6.2 Training for Professionals

2012 Royal College of Surgeons of England

19. Covid-19: Mental health resources for disability support service providers

Covid-19: Mental health resources for disability support service providers Mental health resources for disability support service providers 11 May 2020 Stopping the spread of COVID-19 has meant that all New Zealander’s have had to live differently. This different way of living might be particularly challenging for the people you support. During different Alert Levels they may have had to live with people or be supported by workers that they don’t know. They also may have been unable to see (...) something fun that you know makes them feel good. For disabled people living alone with low levels of support, Alert Levels 3 and 4 restrictions will have meant many weeks without physical contact and in many cases little social contact. Be aware of the impact that this significant period of isolation may have had on the person’s taha hinengaro (mental health). It is also a good idea to talk to people about the news and information they are accessing. Even as the COVID-19 situation improves in New

2020 Covid-19 Ad hoc guidelines

20. Practice Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders in Children and Adolescents With Intellectual Disability (Intellectual Developmental Disorder)

in this population. Optimal assessment and treatment of psychiatric illness in children and adolescents with ID/IDD includes modi?cations in diagnostic and treatment techniques, appreciation of variations in the clinical pre- sentation of psychiatric disorders, an understanding of the spectrum of etiologies of behavioral disturbance, and knowledge of psychosocial and medical interventions. Key words: practice parameter, intellectual disability, child psychiatry, assessment, treatment J Am Acad Child Adolesc (...) been developed, and speci?c training incorpo- rated into psychiatric curricula. 2 The most recent conceptual paradigm shift began in 1992, when the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities’ (AAIDD) new de?nition placed greater emphasis on the disability construct by changing the earlier term “mental retardation” to “intel- lectual disability.” The premise is that a disability occurs when the demands of the environment exceed an in- dividual’s ability. Thus, environmental

2020 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

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