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81. A European Renal Best Practice (ERBP) position statement on the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Clinical Practice Guidelines on Acute Kidney Injury: part 2: renal replacement therapy

A European Renal Best Practice (ERBP) position statement on the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Clinical Practice Guidelines on Acute Kidney Injury: part 2: renal replacement therapy NephrolDialTransplant (2013)28:2940–2945 doi:10.1093/ndt/gft297 AdvanceAccesspublication11October2013 NDT Perspectives AEuropeanRenalBestPractice(ERBP)positionstatementon theKidneyDiseaseImprovingGlobalOutcomes(KDIGO) ClinicalPracticeGuidelinesonAcuteKidneyInjury:part2: renalreplacementtherapy (...) ,TheNetherlandsand 5 Renaldivision,GhentUniversityHospital,Ghent,Belgium Correspondenceandoffprintrequeststo: WimVanBiesen;E-mail:wim.vanbiesen@ugent.be Keywords: acute kidney injury, European renal best practice, evidence-basedmedicine,guideline,renalreplacementtherapy ABSTRACT This paper provides an endorsement of the KDIGO guideline on acute kidney injury; more speci?cally, on the part that con- cerns renal replacement therapy. New evidence that has emerged since the publication of the KDIGO guideline

2013 European Renal Best Practice

82. KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Acute Kidney Injury

requiring RRT. (2C) 5.5.1: We suggest to use dialyzers with a biocompatible membrane for IHD and CRRT in patients with AKI. (2C) 5.6.1: Use continuous and intermittent RRTas complementary therapies in AKI patients. (Not Graded) 5.6.2: We suggest using CRRT, rather than standard intermittent RRT, for hemodynamically unstable patients. (2B) 5.6.3: We suggest using CRRT, rather than intermittent RRT, for AKI patients with acute brain injuryor other causes of increased intracranial pressure or generalized (...) KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Acute Kidney Injury VOLUME 2 | ISSUE 1 | MARCH 2012 http://www.kidney-international.org OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY OF NEPHROLOGY KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Acute Kidney Injury KI_SuppCover_2.1.indd 1 KI_SuppCover_2.1.indd 1 2/7/12 12:32 PM 2/7/12 12:32 PMKDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Acute Kidney Injury Tables and Figures iv Notice 1 Work Group Membership 2 KDIGO Board Members 3 Reference Keys 4 Abbreviations

2012 National Kidney Foundation

83. KDOQI US Commentary on the 2012 KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Acute Kidney Injury

associated with harm in patients with traumatic brain injury and shouldbeavoidedinthatsetting. 37,38 There are also speci?c settings in which albumin is appropriate for initial management of expansion of intravascular volume. Speci?cally, in patients with liver disease, intravenous albumin administration ap- pears to be bene?cial for the prevention of renal failure and death in patients with spontaneous bacte- rial peritonitis, as well as for the prevention of renal failure in those undergoing large (...) KDOQI US Commentary on the 2012 KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Acute Kidney Injury KDOQI Commentary KDOQIUSCommentaryonthe2012KDIGOClinicalPractice GuidelineforAcuteKidneyInjury PaulM.Palevsky,MD, 1,2 KathleenD.Liu,MD,PhD, 3 PatrickD.Brophy,MD, 4 LakhmirS.Chawla,MD, 5 ChiragR.Parikh,MD,PhD, 6,7 CharuhasV.Thakar,MD, 8,9 AshitaJ.Tolwani,MD, 10 SushrutS.Waikar,MD, 11 andStevenD.Weisbord,MD 1,2 In response to the recently released 2012 KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes

2012 National Kidney Foundation

84. A European Renal Best Practice (ERBP) position statement on the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Clinical Practice Guidelines on Acute Kidney Injury: Part 1: definitions, conservative management and contrast-induced nephropathy

A European Renal Best Practice (ERBP) position statement on the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Clinical Practice Guidelines on Acute Kidney Injury: Part 1: definitions, conservative management and contrast-induced nephropathy NDT Perspectives A European Renal Best Practice (ERBP) position statement on the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Clinical Practice Guidelines on Acute Kidney Injury: Part 1: de?nitions, conservative management and contrast-induced (...) Department of Nephrology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium Correspondence and offprint requests to: Wim Van Biesen; E-mail: wim.vanbiesen@ugent.be † This document has been produced according to the instructions forauthors of ERBP (see www.european-renal-best-practice.org). Keywords: acute kidney injury; contrast-induced nephropathy, diagnosis, guideline, prevention Introduction The broad clinical syndrome of acute kidney injury (AKI) encompasses various aetiologies, including speci?c kidney

2012 European Renal Best Practice

85. Guideline for Reversal of Antithrombotics in Intracranial Hemorrhage

agents, intracranial hemorrhage , subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, intraparenchymal hemorrhage, subdural hematoma, subdural hemorrhage, intraventricular hemorrhage, epidural hemorrhage, epidural hematoma, and traumatic brain injury. A professional librarian organized this list of key words, developed medical subject heading terms, searched relevant clinical databases (including PubMed/Medline, Library of Science, the Cochrane database, Excerpta Medica dataBASE, and Cumulative Index (...) of the recommendations from this document can be found in . | VKA Reversal We recommend discontinuing VKAs when intracranial hemorrhage is present or suspected (Good Practice statement). We recommend urgent reversal of VKAs in patients with intracranial hemorrhage (Strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence) with the following considerations: a. We suggest against VKA reversal in patients where there is a high suspicion of intracranial hemorrhage due to cerebral venous thrombosis (Conditional recommendation

2016 Society of Critical Care Medicine

86. Guidelines for the management of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms Full Text available with Trip Pro

% to 6.0%, with higher prevalence in women and an increased prevalence with age. A recent cross-sectional study from China of 4813 adults aged 35 to 75 years found a prevalence of 7.0% based on MRA, also with a higher prevalence in women than men. In the population-based Rotterdam Study, in which 2000 patients (mean age 63 years; range, 45.7–96.7 years) underwent protocol-driven high-resolution structural brain MRI, the prevalence of incidental intracranial aneurysms (IAs) was found to be 1.8 (...) . There is also an increased risk of detection if ≥2 members of a family have a history of SAH or UIA. In 1 study of 438 people from 85 families, 38 first-degree relatives (8.7%) had a UIA on screening imaging. In the Familial Intracranial Aneurysm (FIA) Study, first-degree relatives of those affected with brain aneurysm who were >30 years old and had a history of either smoking or hypertension were screened with MRA. Among the first 304 patients screened, 58 (19.1%) had at least 1 IA. In long-term serial MRA

2015 American Academy of Neurology

87. Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

with unruptured intracranial aneurysms. The guidelines address presentation, natural history , epidemiology , risk factors, screening, diagnosis, imaging and outcomes from surgical and endovascular treatment. (Stroke. 2015;46:2368-2400. DOI: 10.1161/STR.0000000000000070.) Key Words: AHA Scientific Statements ? cerebral aneurysm ? epidemiology ? imaging ? natural history ? outcome ? risk factors ? treatment Guidelines for the Management of Patients With Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms A Guideline (...) . †For comparative effectiveness recommendations (Class I and IIa; Level of Evidence A and B only), studies that support the use of comparator verbs should involve direct comparisons of the treatments or strategies being evaluated. Downloaded from http://ahajournals.org by on March 27, 2019Thompson et al Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms 2371 underwent protocol-driven high-resolution structural brain MRI, the prevalence of incidental intracranial aneurysms (IAs) was found to be 1.8%, with no change

2015 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

88. Guidelines for the Management of Patients With Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms Full Text available with Trip Pro

-resolution structural brain MRI, the prevalence of incidental intracranial aneurysms (IAs) was found to be 1.8%, with no change in prevalence by age ; however, in another systematic review and meta-analysis of other population-based observational studies of incidental findings on MRI (including the Rotterdam Study), the prevalence of IAs was only 0.35% (95% CI, 0.13%–0.67%), but age data were not complete, and only cross-sectional MRI was available. In the large population-based Norwegian Nord-Trøndelag (...) , higher fasting glucose, family history of polycystic kidney disease, and family history of SAH or aneurysm in ≥2 relatives. There is also an increased risk of detection if ≥2 members of a family have a history of SAH or UIA. In 1 study of 438 people from 85 families, 38 first-degree relatives (8.7%) had a UIA on screening imaging. In the Familial Intracranial Aneurysm (FIA) Study, first-degree relatives of those affected with brain aneurysm who were >30 years old and had a history of either smoking

2015 American Heart Association

89. Unintentional injuries: prevention strategies for under 15s

Unintentional injuries: prevention strategies for under 15s Unintentional injuries: pre Unintentional injuries: prev vention ention str strategies for under 15s ategies for under 15s Public health guideline Published: 24 November 2010 nice.org.uk/guidance/ph29 © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE (...) in this guideline should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with complying with those duties. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Unintentional injuries: prevention strategies for under 15s (PH29) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions

2010 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

90. Nursing management of adults with severe traumatic brain injury.

Nursing management of adults with severe traumatic brain injury. Guidelines and Measures | Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality HHS.gov Search ahrq.gov Search ahrq.gov Menu Topics A - Z Healthcare Delivery Latest available findings on quality of and access to health care Searchable database of AHRQ Grants, Working Papers & HHS Recovery Act Projects AHRQ Projects funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund You are here Guidelines and Measures Funding for the National

2009 Publication 1376

91. Preterm Labour, Antibiotics and Cerebral Palsy

not report that infection/inflammation is associated with central nervous system injury and cerebral palsy, 11,12 a direct effect of intrauterine infection/inflammation is supported by studies showing a higher risk of brain injury in infants born preterm with spontaneous onset of labour (high frequency of infection) compared with physician–initiated delivery (low frequency of infection). 13,14 Furthermore, funisitis (inflammation of the connective tissue of the umbilical cord) 15,16 high cytokines (IL–6 (...) . A continuing inflammatory environment could lead to fetal brain injury and thereby cerebral palsy. Finally, it is also possible that the episode of spontaneous preterm labour was not associated with infection, but with other pathologies associated with the so called ‘preterm parturition syndrome’. 38 A recently published nested study 41 investigated the profile of impairment, recorded by parents and physiotherapists, for children in the OCS, and contrasted outcomes with those in a population cerebal palsy

2013 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

92. Head injury

is estimated to occur in 33–50% of all people following traumatic brain injury, and may be caused by haemorrhage, raised intracranial pressure, oedema, skull fracture, or direct insult to the pituitary gland. Symptoms are often non-specific and overlap with post-concussion symptoms. Rare life-threatening complications include sodium dysregulation and adrenal crisis. Depression and anxiety A large single cohort study (n = 559) found that 53.1% of people met the criteria for depression at some point (...) rate from childhood head injury was 0.4% [ ]. [ ; ; ] Prognosis Prognosis The majority of people have minor head injuries and recover without specific or specialist intervention [ ]. Delayed presentation of intracranial complications is rare after mild traumatic brain injury, and usually occurs within 24 hours of the injury. A deterioration in clinical state 21 days after a head injury is very rare, occurring in only 0.1% of cases [ ]. Most people who have persistent symptoms of mild traumatic

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

93. Recommendations for the Management of Cerebral and Cerebellar Infarction with Swelling

Recommendations for the Management of Cerebral and Cerebellar Infarction with Swelling 1222 Background and Purpose—There are uncertainties surrounding the optimal management of patients with brain swelling after an ischemic stroke. Guidelines are needed on how to manage this major complication, how to provide the best comprehensive neurological and medical care, and how to best inform families facing complex decisions on surgical intervention in deteriorating patients. This scientific statement (...) /ASA Scientific Statement Downloaded from http://ahajournals.org by on March 27, 2019Wijdicks et al Management of Cerebral and Cerebellar Infarction 1223 T he emergence of brain swelling is the most troublesome and even life-threatening consequence of a large-territory isch- emic stroke. Brain swelling occurs as a result of loss of func- tion of membrane transporters, causing sodium and water influx into the necrotic or ischemic cell, leading to cytotoxic edema. Unrelenting swelling disrupts

2014 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

94. Invasive interventional management of post-hemorrhagic cerebral vasospasm in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

cerebral artery and the P1 segment of the posterior cerebral artery where congenitalhypoplasiaisverycommon.Furthermore,fenestrated vessels in severe spasm may appear to have a single lumen, and failure to recognize the fenestration because a baseline cerebral angiogramwasnotavailablecanleadtooverdilationwithvessel rupture or other catastrophic injury. Some authors have reported that small to moderate sized CT hypodensities may resolve after cerebral reperfusion by TBA. 38 Nevertheless (...) . Currently used methods for IAVT include bolus injections or brief infusions over a period of approximately 30e90min. Disadvantages of currently used IAVT techniques include delayed onset of action, temporary therapeutic effect and the possibility of intracranial hypertension when multiple vascular territories are treated. MODALITY SPECIFIC PROCEDURAL SAFETY Transluminal balloon angioplasty Complications of TBA for cerebral vasospasm include vessel perforation (with microguidewire, microcatheter

2012 Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery

95. Standard of practice: endovascular treatment of intracranial atherosclerosis

for the Wingspan stent (patients with 50e99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery with a cerebral ischemic event, refractory to medical therapy). 112 Aspects of periprocedural management As mentioned, periprocedural care is of critical importance in this procedure. Platelet function testing is becoming commonplace in neurovascularintervention.Variouslaboratory based methods are available, and point of care testing is also available through the Verify Now system (Accumetrics, San Diego, California, USA (...) of this guidelines document. Competing interests None. Provenance and peer review Commissioned; not externally peer reviewed. REFERENCES 1. Sacco RL, Kargman DE, Gu Q, et al. Race-ethnicity and determinants of intracranial atherosclerotic cerebral infarction. The Northern Manhattan Stroke Study. Stroke 1995;26:14e20. 2. Wong LK. Global burden of intracranial atherosclerosis. Int J Stroke 2006;1:158e9. 3. Chaturvedi S, Turan TN, Lynn MJ, et al. Risk factor status and vascular events in patients with symptomatic

2012 Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery

96. Magnesium Sulphate to Prevent Cerebral Palsy following Preterm Birth

asa neuroprotective agent is unknown, it hasa number of biologically plausible actions which may contribute to a protective effect on the preterm neonatal brain. The most common pathological lesion associated with cerebral palsy in preterm infants is periventri- cular white matter injury. 5 Oligodendrocytes constitutea major glial population in the white matter. N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors on oligodendrocytes are thought to be important in the glial injury process. NMDA receptor (...) antagonists are potent neuroprotective agents in several animal models of perinatal brain injury. Magnesium sulphate may reverse the harmful effects of hypoxic/ischaemic brain injury by blocking NMDA receptors, acting asa calcium antagonist and reducing calcium influx into the cells. 10,11 Magnesium sulphate is also implicated in tissue protection against free radical activity, 11 has been shown to act asa vasodilator, 3 reduces vascular instability, prevents hypoxic damage, 12 attenuates cytokine

2011 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

97. Early management of patients with a head injury

coagulopathy was a risk factor for intracranial lesion. One study of 13,728 patients found a high association, 44 while a smaller study reported an OR of 4.48. 43 Suspicion of non-accidental injury (NAI) in children had a PPv for significant brain injury of 0.33. 40 B adult patients with any of the following signs and symptoms should be referred to an appropriate hospital for further assessment of potential brain injury: gCs 5 minutes ? retrograde amnesia >30 minutes ? high risk mechanism of injury ? (road (...) % of these are due to a head injury. 4 Up to half of all inpatient adults with a head injury experience long term psychological and/or physical disability, 5-7 as defined by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), 8 and patients who sustain intracranial events as a complication of head injury can suffer long term sequelae, especially if definitive therapy is delayed. Evidence based guidelines can help to achieve optimal care. In Scotland about half of those attending are children under the age of 14 years. The majority

2009 SIGN

98. ACR-ASNR Practice Guideline for the Performance of Computed Tomography (CT) of the Brain

. Evaluation of cerebral perfusion parameters measured by perfusion CT in chronic cerebral ischemia: comparison with xenon CT. J Comput Assist Tomogr 2002;26:272-278. 14. Gentry LR. Imaging of closed head injury. Radiology 1994;191:1-17. 15. Griffiths PD, Wilkinson ID, Patel MC, et al. Acute neuromedical and neurosurgical admissions. Standard and ultrafast MR imaging of the brain compared with cranial CT. Acta Radiol 2000;41:401-409. 16. Hakimelahi R, Gonzalez RG. Neuroimaging of ischemic stroke with CT (...) . This guideline outlines the principles for performing high-quality CT imaging of the brain in pediatric and adult patients, including advanced applications such as CT perfusion, CT volumetry, CT angiography, and CT venography. II. INDICATIONS Indications for CT of the brain include, but are not limited to: A. Primary Indications 1. Acute head trauma. 2. Suspected acute intracranial hemorrhage. 2 / CT Brain PRACTICE GUIDELINE 3. Vascular occlusive disease or vasculitis (including use of CT angiography

2010 American Society of Neuroradiology

99. Determining brain death in adults

Doppler (TCD) but no opacification of intracranial vessels in 1 patient. These Class IV studies included only patients meeting criteria for brain death. One Class III case-control study included patients meeting criteria for brain death and normal controls. CTA demonstrated no flow in 14 patients diagnosed with brain death (sensitivity 100%, 95% CI 78.5%–100%). CTA demonstrated cerebral flow in all normal controls (false-positive rate 0%, 95% CI 0%–25.9%). This study did not include non-brain-dead (...) intoxication, high cervical spinal cord injury, lidocaine toxicity, baclofen overdose, and delayed vecuronium clearance. The description of the examinations provided in these studies indicated that a complete brain death examination was not performed in any of these patients. We found no reports in peer-reviewed medical journals of recovery of brain function after a determination of brain death using the AAN practice parameter. Conclusion. In adults, recovery of neurologic function has not been reported

2010 American Academy of Neurology

100. Helmet Efficacy to Reduce Head Injury and Mortality in Motorcycle Crashes

laws were 52% more likely to sustain the most severe forms of traumatic brain injury (RR: 1.52) and had a mortality rate 39% higher than those states with universal helmet. III Lin JW Tsai SH Tsai WC Chiu WT Chu SF Lin CM Yang CM Hung CC Survey of traumatic intracranial hemorrhage in Taiwan 2006 Surgical Neurology S2:20-25 Retrospective review of 90,250 head trauma case admitted to the hospital in Taiwan, excluding dead on arrivals and outpatients over an 8 year period. 47% of all injuries were (...) crash is as high as 4.3 times to a low of 1.7 times higher than after a helmeted crash in nine retrospective cross-sectional studies. However, for severe head injuries, most commonly defined as an Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥2, the magnitude of the estimate is uniformly larger. For three retrospective studies, the ORs of a severe head injury were 18.1 (12.5–25.3), 4.4 (2.58–7.37), and 3.7 (1.9–7.3), respectively. [13][32][38] Lin et al. showed a 41% increase in trauma-induced brain hemorrhage

2010 Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma

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