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41. Guidelines for the prescription of a seated wheelchair or mobility scooter for people with a traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury

Guidelines for the prescription of a seated wheelchair or mobility scooter for people with a traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury Guidelines for the prescription of a seated wheelchair or mobility scooter for people with a traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury Guidelines for the prescription of a seated wheelchair or mobility scooter for people with a traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury 2 Guidelines for the prescription of a seated wheelchair or mobility scooter (...) for people with a traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury This publication is endorsed by Occupational Therapy (OT) Australia – NSW Division You may copy, distribute, display and otherwise freely deal with this work for any purpose, provided that you attribute the LTCSA and EnableNSW as the owners. However, you must obtain permission if you wish to (1) charge others for access to the work (other than at cost), (2) include the work in advertising or a product for sale, or (3) modify the work. ISBN

2011 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

42. Cerebral palsy in adults

memory and cognitive flexibility. As a result of injuries to the frontal lobes of the brain, these processes can be disrupted. Gross Motor F Gross Motor Function Classification System unction Classification System A 5-level clinical classification system that describes the gross motor function of people with cerebral palsy based on self-initiated movement abilities. People assessed as level I are the most able and people assessed as level V are dependent on others for all their mobility needs (...) , despite having enteral anti-dystonic drug treatment or botulinum toxin type A [5] treatment. Provide information and discuss the procedure, including intrathecal baclofen testing, with the person (and their family or carer, if agreed) as described in recommendations 1.3.13 to 1.3.16. Deep br Deep brain stimulation ain stimulation 1.3.25 If adults with cerebral palsy continue to have severe and painful dystonia, despite having enteral anti-dystonic drug treatment or botulinum toxin type A treatment

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

43. All-Terrain Vehicle Injuries, Prevention of

mandating use were developed. A query of MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Embase for all-terrain vehicle injury was performed. Letters to the editor, case reports, book chapters, and review articles were excluded. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology was used to perform a systematic review and create recommendations. RESULTS Twenty-eight studies were included. Helmet use reduced traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, studies examining whether legislation (...) of the manuscript or a disclosure at the end of the manuscript is adequate. PICO Questions PICO Question 1: Among four-wheel ATV riders, should helmets be used to reduce the incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI)? PICO Question 2: Among four-wheel ATV riders, should legislation requiring the use of helmets be enacted to increase helmet utilization? PICO Question 3: Among four-wheel ATV riders, should non-helmet protective gear be utilized to lessen injury severity? PICO Question 4: Among four-wheel ATV

2018 Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma

44. Defining Optimal Brain Health in Adults Full Text available with Trip Pro

and dementia are common in the population, especially among older people, and exact a substantial economic and personal toll. As the population in the United States ages, cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus are expected to continue to significantly increase in frequency. Subclinical vascular brain injury (eg, brain white matter hyperintensities, microinfarcts, cerebral microbleeds) and symptomatic stroke, antecedent risks, and associated factors are frequently (...) after brain injury; produces neuronal, glial, and vascular growth factors that support the reciprocal survival of its cellular constituents and the adjacent brain parenchyma; and is a major conduit for the clearance of potentially deleterious byproducts of brain activity such as β-amyloid and tau through transvascular, perivascular, and paravascular (glymphatic) pathways. CBF indicates cerebral blood flow. In addition to regulating cerebral perfusion, the NVU is responsible for the blood-brain

2017 American Heart Association

45. Management of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Full Text available with Trip Pro

with ruptured and unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations, suggestions for management, and implications for future research. Brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVMs) are uncommon vascular lesions that present with spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), seizures, or headache and typically in young adults. A large proportion of patients are diagnosed with incidental asymptomatic bAVMs after brain imaging is obtained for other reasons. Current treatment options include conservative management (...) obstruction, and deep or infratentorial location. Identification of these features is critically important and guides treatment in many patients. Genetic factors and microscopic hemorrhage have also been associated with hemorrhage as a clinical presentation. Figure 1. Artist’s rendition of a superficial brain arteriovenous malformation on the cortical surface. The primary feeding arteries are branches of the middle cerebral artery. There is a small feeding artery aneurysm seen best on the magnified inset

2017 American Heart Association

46. Management of brain arteriovenous malformations

that present with spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), seizures, or headache and typically in young adults. A large proportion of patients are diagnosed with incidental asymptomatic bAVMs after brain imaging is obtained for other reasons. Current treatment options include conservative management, surgical resection, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), endovascular embolization, or combinations of these treatments (multimodal therapy). The primary goal of these interventions is to prevent hemorrhagic (...) associated with hemorrhage as a clinical presentation. Figure 1. Artist’s rendition of a superficial brain arteriovenous malformation on the cortical surface. The primary feeding arteries are branches of the middle cerebral artery. There is a small feeding artery aneurysm seen best on the magnified inset in the top left corner. The nidus is depicted as a mix of red and blue vessels. The draining veins are superficial (on the cortical surface and draining to the sagittal and transverse sinuses). Figure 2

2017 American Academy of Neurology

47. Shaken baby syndrome or non-accidental head injury caused by shaking

injury caused by shaking Practice guidelines - Posted on Sep 29 2017 Shaken baby syndrome (SBS) is a subsection of inflicted head injuries or non-accidental head injury (NAHI), in which shaking, alone or in combination with impact, causes head and brain injury. The subject of this guideline is NAHI caused by shaking. The shaking in question is always violent, and usually done by grasping the baby’s chest under the armpits. The violent back-and-forth movements of the head cause the brain to bounce (...) Shaken baby syndrome or non-accidental head injury caused by shaking Haute Autorité de Santé - Shaken baby syndrome or non-accidental head injury caused by shaking Fermer Choose language Accessibility Change contrast : Standards Reinforced icone Chercher icone plus Chercher My account My account Please fill in your email address to retrieve your email alerts subscriptions. Please fill in your email address to retrieve your newsletter subscriptions. You do not have a saved search Sélection

2017 HAS Guidelines

48. Shaken baby syndrome or non-accidental head injury caused by shaking

muscle lesions are an additional sign suggestive of shaking, but are not always present. They are significantly associated with the presence of diffuse cerebral hypoxic-ischaemic lesions. ? Bone lesions: all traumatic injuries may be and should alert (fractures, periosteal appositions and calluses reflecting an old fracture, etc.) to the possibility of non-accidental trauma; some lesions are particularly common in case of abuse, such as rib fractures and metaphyseal corner fractures. These fractures (...) may be latent clinically, more specifically in these situations of inflicted trauma that may alter the clinical expression of pain. ? Clinical and paraclinical hospital assessment in a living child Clinical examination: thorough examination, especially neurological, HC, weight and height curves, screening for traumatic injuries (which must be photographed), the state of the fontanel. ? Careful examination of the health record book. ? Brain CT scan without injection: first-line, urgent examination

2017 HAS Guidelines

49. Penetrating Neck Injury

mandate immediate operative evaluation and treatment without preoperative imaging. Symptoms related to cerebral ischemia are also hard signs of penetrating injury, but these patients may be stable enough to benefit from first performing imaging studies. Imaging of the brain in addition to the head and neck vasculature may be used to determine optimal surgical, endovascular, or medical therapy. Soft signs of vascular and aerodigestive injury include nonpulsatile or nonexpanding hematoma, venous oozing (...) esophageal injuries [27]. As arterial injury occurs in a proportion of patients with penetrating neck injury, one must be cognizant of the possibility of end-organ injury, particularly to the brain. Although not directly related to imaging of the neck in penetrating injuries, imaging of the brain and cerebral vasculature may be considered where cervical vascular injury is determined either by clinical examination, imaging, or surgery. Discussion of Procedures by Variant Variant 1: Penetrating neck injury

2017 American College of Radiology

50. Cerebral palsy in under 25s: assessment and management

of functional impairment than other causes. 1.2.5 Recognise that the clinical syndrome of neonatal encephalopathy can result from various pathological events, such as a hypoxic–ischaemic brain injury or sepsis, and if there has been more than 1 such event they may interact to damage the developing brain. 1.2.6 When assessing the likely cause of cerebral palsy, recognise that neonatal encephalopathy has been reported at the following approximate prevalences in Cerebral palsy in under 25s: assessment (...) of the initial encephalopathy the dyskinetic motor subtype is more common than other subtypes. 1.2.8 Recognise that for cerebral palsy acquired after the neonatal period, the following causes and approximate prevalences have been reported: meningitis: 20% other infections: 30% head injury: 12%. 1.2.9 When assessing the likely cause of cerebral palsy, recognise that independent risk factors: can have a cumulative impact, adversely affecting the developing brain and resulting in cerebral palsy may have

2017 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

51. Guidelines for the Acute Treatment of Cerebral Edema in Neurocritical Care Patients

, Mahamid E, et al. Comparison of effects of equiosmolar doses of mannitol and hypertonic saline on cerebral blood flow and metabolism in traumatic brain injury. J Neurotrauma. 2011;28(10):2003–12. 25. Sakellaridis N, Pavlou E, Karatzas S, et al. Comparison of mannitol and hypertonic saline in the treatment of severe brain injuries. J Neurosurg. 2011;114(2):545–8. 26. Ichai C, Armando G, Orban J-C, et al. Sodium lactate versus mannitol in the treatment of intracranial hypertensive episodes in severe (...) Hirsch 9 and Lori Shutter 12 © 2020 The Author(s) Background: Acute treatment of cerebral edema and elevated intracranial pressure is a common issue in patients with neurological injury. Practical recommendations regarding selection and monitoring of therapies for initial management of cerebral edema for optimal efficacy and safety are generally lacking. This guideline evaluates the role of hyperosmolar agents (mannitol, HTS), corticosteroids, and selected non-pharmacologic therapies in the acute

2020 Neurocritical Care Society

52. Head Injury

scoring systems such as the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT), the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) or Alert, Voice, Pain, Unresponsive (AVPU) versus standard first aid without a scoring system. (CoSTR 2015) 2 The serious consequences of not recognising concussion in the first aid environment warrants advising all victims who have sustained a head injury, regardless of severity, to seek assessment by an health care professional or at a hospital. 2 Recognition A brain injury should be suspected (...) if the victim has a reported or witnessed injury, has signs of injury to the head or face such as bruises or bleeding, or is found in a confused or unconscious state. A victim may have a brain injury without external signs of injury to the head or face. Serious problems may not be obvious for several hours after the initial injury. 3 Management • Call an ambulance if there has been a loss of consciousness or altered consciousness at any time, no matter how brief. • A victim who has sustained a head injury

2016 Australian Resuscitation Council

53. Management of Suspected Spinal Injury

environment review their approach to the management of suspected spinal injury with regards to SR cervical collars. Consistent with the first aid principle of preventing further harm, the potential benefits of applying a cervical collar do not outweigh harms such as increased intracranial pressure, pressure injuries or pain and unnecessary movement that can occur with the fitting and application of a collar. In suspected cervical spine injury, ANZCOR recommends that the initial management should be manual (...) backboard: does it Result in neutral position of the Cervical Spine. Annals of Emergency Medicine. 1991; vol 20,8: 878-881 8. Houghton D, Curley J: Dysphagia caused by a hard cervical collar. British Journal of Neurosurgery. 1996: vol 10, 5: 501-502 9. Davies G, Deakin C, Wilson A: The effect of a rigid collar on intracranial pressure. Injury. 1996; vol 27, 9: 647-649 10. Ramasamy A, Midwinter M, Mahoney P, Clasper J: Learning the lessons from conflict: Pre- hospital cervical spine stabilisation

2016 Australian Resuscitation Council

54. Sharps injuries: exposure to blood borne viruses

to BBVs. This document describes the action to be taken when a blood borne virus exposure (sharps injury) occurs, providing the necessary information to enable the HCW to assess their individual risk and to follow an appropriate course of action. The standard described should be applied in all incidents. 3. Definitions 3.1 Body fluids posing a risk Body fluids which may pose a risk of blood borne virus transmission if significant occupational exposure occurs are ( ): blood amniotic fluid cerebral (...) Sharps injuries: exposure to blood borne viruses Sharps injuries: exposure to blood borne viruses | Great Ormond Street Hospital Google Tag Manager Navigation Search Search You are here Sharps injuries: exposure to blood borne viruses Sharps injuries: exposure to blood borne viruses (227.95 KB) b) Report to line manager The manager should ensure risk assessment occurs by: During normal working hours: send staff member to the Occupational Health Department (OHD). Outside normal working hours

2015 Publication 1593

55. Assessment and Management of Pressure Injuries for the Interprofessional Team, Third Edition

. of Medicine University of Toronto UHN Toronto Rehabilitation Institute Lyndhurst Center, Brain and Spinal Cord Program Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Consultant and Staff Physician Toronto, Ontario22 REGISTERED NURSES’ ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO BACKGROUND Assessment and Management of Pressure Injuries for the Interprofessional Team, Third Edition Kim-Marie Meeker, RN, BScN, CETN(C), CON(C) Staff Nurse Mount Sinai Hospital Toronto, Ontario Deborah Mings, RN, MHSc, IIWCC Clinical Manager (...) Assessment and Management of Pressure Injuries for the Interprofessional Team, Third Edition Clinical Best Practice Guidelines MAY 2016 Assessment and Management of Pressure Injuries for the Interprofessional T eam Third EditionDisclaimer Th ese guidelines are not binding on nurses, other health care professionals, or the organizations that employ them. Th e use of these guidelines should be fl exible, and based on individual needs and local circumstances. Th ey neither constitute a liability

2016 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

56. Early Management of Head Injury in Adults

, disorientation and slow thinking] • objective neurological deficits (such as weakness, loss of balance, change in vision, praxis, paresis/paraplegia, sensory loss and aphasia) that may or may not be transient 2. Anatomical changes • scalp and/or facial wound or swelling • skull fracture (facial, basilar or vault) and/or clinical signs of skull fracture*** • diagnosed intracranial lesion such as brain parenchyma injury, injury to intracranial blood vessels, injury to the dura mater, intracranial haemorrhage (...) head injury: GCS 3 - 8 The MHI group can be subdivided into two types as shown in Table 1. 10 - 11, level III Table 1. Classification of MHI Refer to Appendix 3 on Glasgow Coma Scale. Cerebral concussion Should only be used if there is no imaging evidence of brain injury With or without history of LOC Can be further subdivided into: GCS 15 Mild head injury GCS 13 - 15 With or without imaging evidence of brain injury Requires a LOC (=30 minutes) or post- traumatic amnesia (=24 hours) Can be further

2015 Ministry of Health, Malaysia

57. KHA-CARI adaptation of the KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Acute Kidney Injury

of 3.9 per week when using intermittent HD (1A) c. A target plasma urea of<25 mmol/L when using inter- mittent HD or SLED (1B) 2. CRRT versus IRRT a. We suggest using CRRT and IRRT as complementary therapies in AKI patients and in the context of local resources available (2C); however, we suggest that CRRT be used in preference to IRRT in AKI patients: • Who are haemodynamically unstable (2B); or • Who have acute brain injury or generalized brain oedema. (2B) KHA-CARI adaptation of KDIGO AKI (...) KHA-CARI adaptation of the KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Acute Kidney Injury Original Article KHA-CARI guideline: KHA-CARI adaptation of the KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Acute Kidney Injury ROBYN G LANGHAM, 1 RINALDO BELLOMO, 2 VINCENT D’ INTINI, 3 ZOLTAN ENDRE, 4 BERNADETTE B HICKEY, 5 SHAY MCGUINNESS, 6,7 RICHARD K S PHOON, 8 KAREN SALAMON, 9 JULIE WOODS 9 and MARTIN P GALLAGHER 10 1 Department of Nephrology and The University of Melbourne Department of Medicine, St

2014 KHA-CARI Guidelines

58. Treatment of acute kidney injury

was no more effective than saline for either mortality, the development of AKI or the requirement for renal replacement therapy (RRT) [6]. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated a trend towards higher mortality in patients with traumatic brain injury who received albumin and a trend towards lower mortality with albumin in a subgroup of patients with sepsis. A large study of the use of albumin in septic patients has recently completed recruitment and the results once published may help to answer the question (...) Treatment of acute kidney injury KHA-CARI Adaptation of KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Acute Kidney Injury (May 2014) Page 1 Section 2. TREATMENT OF ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY Authors: Shay McGuinness, Rinaldo Bellomo, Karen Salamon and Julie Woods GUIDELINES 1. Fluids a. In the absence of haemorrhagic shock, we suggest using isotonic crystalloids rather than colloids for volume resuscitation. (2B) b. We recommend against using hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions for volume resuscitation. (1B

2014 KHA-CARI Guidelines

59. Bicycle helmet use in Canada: The need for legislation to reduce the risk of head injury

helmet use and reduces head injury risk. Evidence for unintended consequences of helmet legislation, such as reduced bicycling and greater risk-taking, is weak and conflicting. Both research evidence to date and recognition of the substantial impact of traumatic brain injuries support the recommendation for all-ages bicycle helmet legislation. Key Words: Bicycle helmet; Head injuries; Legislation   (...) Bicycle helmet use in Canada: The need for legislation to reduce the risk of head injury Bicycling is a popular activity and a healthy, environmentally friendly form of transportation. However, it is also a leading cause of sport and recreational injury in children and adolescents. Head injuries are among the most severe injuries sustained while bicycling, justifying the implementation of bicycle helmet legislation by many provinces. There is evidence that bicycle helmet legislation increases

2013 Canadian Paediatric Society

60. Recommendations on Disease Management for Patients With Advanced Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2?Positive Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases Full Text available with Trip Pro

for brain metastases as well as to develop strategies to manage subsequent intracranial progression events. This guideline addresses what is known about the management of patients with HER2-positive advanced breast cancer and brain metastases. This guideline will not provide comprehensive recommendations for the management of non-CNS disease in patients with HER2-positive advanced breast cancer or provide guidance on HER2 testing, other than noting that quality HER2 testing is required for appropriate (...) and those with symptomatic leptomeningeal metastasis in the brain, WBRT may be offered. For patients with poor prognosis, options include WBRT, best supportive care, and/or palliative care. For patients with progressive intracranial metastases despite initial radiation therapy, options include SRS, surgery, WBRT, a trial of systemic therapy, or enrollment onto a clinical trial, depending on initial treatment. For patients in this group who also have diffuse recurrence, best supportive care

2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines

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