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121. AIM Clinical Appropriateness Guidelines for Interventional Pain Management

steroid injection (ESI) involves the administration of corticosteroid via insertion of a needle into the epidural space surrounding the spinal nerve root. Despite the lack of consistent evidence to support its efficacy, the procedure is widely used in patients with chronic back, neck and radicular pain. In 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration issued a drug safety communication about epidural injection of glucocorticoids, citing the risk for rare but serious adverse effects (loss of vision, stroke (...) with a transforaminal injection. A session is defined as all ESIs or spinal procedures performed on a single day. ? After three injections in the same region, the total cumulative dose of steroid must be documented and may not exceed 240 mg of methylprednisolone or triamcinolone or 36 mg of betamethasone or 45 mg of dexamethasone. Contraindications and Risks The following conditions should prompt further evaluation prior to considering ESI: ? New onset of low back pain or neck pain in the setting of established

2017 AIM Specialty Health

122. Neck Pain

, and compensation expenditures. 13,168 Neck pain is second only to low back pain in annual workers’ compensation costs in the United States. 243 In Sweden, neck and shoulder problems ac- count for 18% of all disability payments. 153 Jette et al 98 report- ed that individuals with neck pain make up approximately 25% of patients receiving outpatient physical therapy care. Additionally, patients with neck pain frequently are treated with nonsurgical interventions by primary care and physical therapy providers (...) and increasing worldwide in both the general population and in specific subgroups. RISK FACTORS 2008 Recommendation Clinicians should consider age greater than 40, coexisting low back pain, a long history of neck pain, cycling as a regu- lar activity, loss of strength in the hands, worrisome attitude, poor quality of life, and less vitality as predisposing factors for the development of chronic neck pain. (Recommendation based on moderate evidence.) For the purposes of this CPG, the term risk

2017 The Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), Inc.

123. Guidelines for Responsible Opioid Prescribing in Chronic Non-Cancer Pain

opioid therapy, with a similar number of pa- tients on opioids in treatment (159-174). Further, Deyo et al (30) illustrated that approximately 61% of patients with low back pain in primary care settings were on a course of opioids and that of these, 19% were long- term users. Multiple surveys have illustrated that the majority of prescriptions are from primary specialties, followed by surgical specialties rather than pain physi- cians (42-45). As shown in Figure 1, 42% of immediate release opioids (...) of life). In addition, various circumstances which increase or exacer- bate the pain and conditions which lead to diminution of pain must be documented (203-206). A physical diagno- sis must be established prior to initiating opioid therapy. The diagnosis should not be non-specific such as low back pain, knee pain etc., but should be objective and some- what specific based on the type of pain and abnormali- ties identified. This will assist in future treatments based on whether the pain is nociceptive

2012 American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians

124. Coping with Common GI Symptoms in the Community: A Global Perspective on Heartburn, Constipation, Bloating, and Abdominal Pain/Discomfort

a bowel motion o Less frequent than usual bowel motions o Hard, dry feces or lumpier than usual o Stomach cramps or bloating o Discomfort or pain in the lower back or stomach o Feeling of incomplete emptying after passing feces o Nausea, irritability, decreased appetite o Tiredness / fatigue 6.2 Epidemiological notes • In one study, 5% of the Canadian population (2% of men and 8% of women) were found to experience one or more lower GI symptoms; 51% of these experienced constipation [59]. WGO Global (...) Coping with Common GI Symptoms in the Community: A Global Perspective on Heartburn, Constipation, Bloating, and Abdominal Pain/Discomfort © World Gastroenterology Organisation, 2013 World Gastroenterology Organisation Global Guidelines Coping with common GI symptoms in the community A global perspective on heartburn, constipation, bloating, and abdominal pain/discomfort May 2013 Review Team Richard Hunt (co-chair, Canada/UK) Eamonn Quigley (co-chair, USA) Zaigham Abbas (Pakistan) Abraham

2013 World Gastroenterology Organisation

125. An Update of Comprehensive Evidence-Based Guidelines for Interventional Techniques in Chronic Spinal Pain - Part 1 - Introduction and General Considerations

with pain that persists for weeks to years, Pain Physician: April Special Issue 2013; 16:S1-S48 S8 www.painphysicianjournal.com but that estimated financial costs range from $560 bil- lion to $630 billion per year, with Americans constitut- ing only 4.5% of the global population. Freberger et al (127), in an evaluation of North Carolina households conducted in 1992 and repeated in 2006, showed a sig- nificant and rapid overall increase for low back pain of 162%, from 3.9% in 1992 to 10.2% in 2006 (...) . These findings have been echoed in numerous studies. Hoy et al (128-130), in multiple publications evaluating spinal pain, showed variable prevalence with a significant re- currence of 24% to 80%; a significant increase in preva- lence as the population ages. Studies of the prevalence of low back and neck pain (131,132) and its impact in the general population have shown 23% of patients re- porting Grade II to IV low back pain with a high pain intensity and disability compared to 15% with neck pain (Fig. 1

2013 American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians

126. Heel Pain - Plantar Fasciitis

Heel Pain - Plantar Fasciitis Clinical Practice Guidelines ROBROY L. MARTIN, PT , PhD • TODD E. DAVENPORT , DPT • STEPHEN F . REISCHL, DPT • THOMAS G. MCPOIL, PT , PhD JAMES W. MATHESON, DPT • DANE K. WUKICH, MD • CHRISTINE M. MCDONOUGH, PT , PhD Heel Pain—Plantar Fasciitis: Revision 2014 Clinical Practice Guidelines Linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health From the Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association J Orthop Sports Phys Ther (...) CLINICAL GUIDELINES: Impairment/Function-Based Diagnosis A7 CLINICAL GUIDELINES: Examination A10 CLINICAL GUIDELINES: Interventions A11 AUTHOR/REVIEWER AFFILIATIONS AND CONTACTS A20 REFERENCES A21 44-11 Guidelines.indd 1 10/20/2014 7:10:39 PM Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy® Downloaded from www.jospt.org at on December 26, 2014. For personal use only. No other uses without permission. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy®. All rights reserved.Heel Pain

2014 The Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), Inc.

127. Nonarthritic Hip Joint Pain

Standing, d4151 Maintaining a squatting position, d4153 Maintaining a sitting position, d4552 Running, d4500 Walking short distances, and d4501 Walking long distances. Other ICF activities and participation codes that may be associated with nonarthritic hip joint pain are: • d2303 Completing the daily routine • d4101 Squatting • d4154 Maintaining a standing position • d4302 Carrying in the arms • d4303 Carrying on shoulders, hip and back • d4351 Kicking • d4502 Walking on different surfaces • d4551 (...) Nonarthritic Hip Joint Pain Clinical Practice Guidelines KEELAN ENSEKI, PT , MS • MARCIE HARRIS-HAYES, DPT , MSCI • DOUGLAS M. WHITE, DPT • MICHAEL T . CIBULKA, DPT JUDITH WOEHRLE, PT , PhD • TIMOTHY L. FAGERSON, DPT • JOHN C. CLOHISY, MD Nonarthritic Hip Joint Pain Clinical Practice Guidelines Linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health From the Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2014;44(6):A1-A32

2014 The Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), Inc.

128. Chronic Knee Pain

. Chronic knee pain. Initial knee radiograph negative or demonstrates joint effusion. Next imaging procedure. Radiography Hip In patients with chronic knee pain, referred pain from the hip must be considered, especially if the knee radiographs are unremarkable and there is clinical evidence or concern for hip pathology [14]. Radiography Lumbar Spine In patients with chronic knee pain, referred pain from the lower back must be considered, especially if the knee radiographs are unremarkable (...) Chronic Knee Pain Revised 2018 ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 1 Chronic Knee Pain American College of Radiology ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® Chronic Knee Pain Variant 1: Adult or child greater than or equal to 5 years of age. Chronic knee pain. Initial imaging. Procedure Appropriateness Category Relative Radiation Level Radiography knee Usually Appropriate ? Aspiration knee Usually Not Appropriate Varies CT arthrography knee Usually Not Appropriate ? CT knee with IV contrast Usually

2018 American College of Radiology

129. Treatment and recommendations for homeless people with Chronic Non-Malignant Pain

the functional impact of pain. Ask about the interval between onset/ exacerbation of pain and the first/current episode of homelessness (e.g., ?Did the back injury occur a few months before you became homeless or while you were living in the shelter??) Because homeless patients with pain may be irritable and are accustomed to having their concerns discounted, the conversation may not feel like an easy one for clinicians. Following are some tips to make it go more smoothly: Tailoring a Substance Use History (...) pain syndromes is elusive (e.g., fibromyalgia or sympathetic dystrophy), identification of an injury from which the pain originated is sometimes possible: Long-term back pain may originate from severe trauma, such as falling off a building, or from athletic injuries or physical labor. Diffuse abdominal pain may be the result of chronic pancreatitis in a patient who no longer drinks. Burning toes may reflect the impact of repeated hypothermia. Lingering dental pain that interrupts sleep may

2011 National Health Care for the Homeless Council

130. Breakthrough cancer pain: a systematic review of pharmacologic management.

Breakthrough cancer pain: a systematic review of pharmacologic management. Breakthrough cancer pain: a systematic review of pharmacologic management. | National Guideline Clearinghouse success fail JUN Jul 10 2017 2018 2019 14 Apr 2018 - 14 Jun 2018 COLLECTED BY Organization: Formed in 2009, the Archive Team (not to be confused with the archive.org Archive-It Team) is a rogue archivist collective dedicated to saving copies of rapidly dying or deleted websites for the sake of history and digital (...) the output of many Archive Team projects, both ongoing and completed. Thanks to the generous providing of disk space by the Internet Archive, multi-terabyte datasets can be made available, as well as in use by the , providing a path back to lost websites and work. Our collection has grown to the point of having sub-collections for the type of data we acquire. If you are seeking to browse the contents of these collections, the Wayback Machine is the best first stop. Otherwise, you are free to dig

2017 National Guideline Clearinghouse (partial archive)

131. Chronic and refractory pain: a systematic review of pharmacologic management in oncology.

Chronic and refractory pain: a systematic review of pharmacologic management in oncology. Chronic and refractory pain: a systematic review of pharmacologic management in oncology. | National Guideline Clearinghouse success fail JUN Jul 10 2017 2018 2019 14 Apr 2018 - 14 Jun 2018 COLLECTED BY Organization: Formed in 2009, the Archive Team (not to be confused with the archive.org Archive-It Team) is a rogue archivist collective dedicated to saving copies of rapidly dying or deleted websites (...) and walkthroughs. This collection contains the output of many Archive Team projects, both ongoing and completed. Thanks to the generous providing of disk space by the Internet Archive, multi-terabyte datasets can be made available, as well as in use by the , providing a path back to lost websites and work. Our collection has grown to the point of having sub-collections for the type of data we acquire. If you are seeking to browse the contents of these collections, the Wayback Machine is the best first stop

2017 National Guideline Clearinghouse (partial archive)

132. Cancer-related acute pain: a systematic review of evidence-based interventions for Putting Evidence Into Practice.

Cancer-related acute pain: a systematic review of evidence-based interventions for Putting Evidence Into Practice. Cancer-related acute pain: a systematic review of evidence-based interventions for Putting Evidence Into Practice. | National Guideline Clearinghouse success fail JUN Jul 10 2017 2018 2019 14 Apr 2018 - 14 Jun 2018 COLLECTED BY Organization: Formed in 2009, the Archive Team (not to be confused with the archive.org Archive-It Team) is a rogue archivist collective dedicated to saving (...) on various projects, manifestos, plans and walkthroughs. This collection contains the output of many Archive Team projects, both ongoing and completed. Thanks to the generous providing of disk space by the Internet Archive, multi-terabyte datasets can be made available, as well as in use by the , providing a path back to lost websites and work. Our collection has grown to the point of having sub-collections for the type of data we acquire. If you are seeking to browse the contents of these collections

2017 National Guideline Clearinghouse (partial archive)

133. Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Pain, Agitation/Sedation, Delirium, Immobility, and Sleep Disruption in Adult Patients in the ICU Full Text available with Trip Pro

Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Pain, Agitation/Sedation, Delirium, Immobility, and Sleep Disruption in Adult Patients in the ICU Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Manageme... : Critical Care Medicine You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Login No user account? Lippincott Journals Subscribers , use your username or email along with your password to log in. Remember me (...) Note Procite Reference Manager Save my selection doi: 10.1097/CCM.0000000000003299 Online Special Article Free Objective: To update and expand the 2013 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Pain , Agitation, and Delirium in Adult Patients in the ICU. Design: Thirty-two international experts, four methodologists, and four critical illness survivors met virtually at least monthly. All section groups gathered face-to-face at annual Society of Critical Care Medicine congresses; virtual

2018 Society of Critical Care Medicine

134. Complex regional pain syndrome in adults. UK guidelines for diagnosis, referral and management in primary and secondary care 2018 (2nd edition)

by a doctor; however, patients should in general be seen by a doctor for medication management. 11 © Royal College of Physicians 2018 rehabilitation services, respectively. Examples of CRPS-specific rehabilitation techniques are outlined in Box 4. After referral, it is important to continue treatment until the patient has been assessed by the pain clinic or CRPS specialist unit. In circumstances where the therapist works within a multidisciplinary team, referral back to the team member who originally (...) Complex regional pain syndrome in adults. UK guidelines for diagnosis, referral and management in primary and secondary care 2018 (2nd edition) Complex regional pain syndrome in adults UK guidelines for diagnosis, referral and management in primary and secondary care 2018 2nd edition 2nd editionComplex regional pain syndrome in adults These guidelines were developed by a panel of experts with support from, representation and endorsement by the Royal College of General Practitioners, the Royal

2018 British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine

135. Management of Cancer Pain in Adult Patients: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines

for chronic NP, for example, for failed back surgery syn- drome and complex regional pain syndrome. This treatment is rec- ommended by the United Kingdom (UK)’s National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) [171]. There has been sig- ni?cant improvement in the technology (hardware and the pro- gramming algorithm including electrical wave forms and frequency) and it is now applicable to alleviate severe NP of either malignant or non-malignant causes. For cancer-related pain, espe- cially (...) Management of Cancer Pain in Adult Patients: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES Management of cancer pain in adult patients: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines † M. Fallon 1 , R. Giusti 2 , F. Aielli 3 , P. Hoskin 4 , R. Rolke 5 , M. Sharma 6 & C. I. Ripamonti 7 , on behalf of the ESMO Guidelines Committee * 1 Edinburgh Cancer Research Centre, IGMM, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; 2 Medical Oncology Unit, Sant’Andrea Hospital of Rome, Rome; 3 Department

2018 European Society for Medical Oncology

136. Chronic Pelvic Pain

Chronic Pelvic Pain Chronic Pelvic Pain | Uroweb › Chronic Pelvic Pain Chronic Pelvic Pain To access the pdfs & translations of individual guidelines, please as EAU member. Non-EAU members can view the web versions. To become an EAU member, click . D. Engeler (Chair), A.P. Baranowski, B. Berghmans, J. Borovicka, A.M. Cottrell, P.S. Elneil, J. Hughes, E. Messelink (Vice-chair), A.C. de C Williams Guidelines Associates: L. Pacheco-Figueiredo, B. Parsons, S. Goonewardene TABLE OF CONTENTS (...) REFERENCES 1. Fall, M., et al., EAU Guidelines on Chronic Pelvic Pain., In: EAU Guidelines on Chronic Pelvic Pain. Presented at the 18th EAU Annual Congress Madrid 2003. 2003, European Association of Urology: Arnhem. 2. Fall, M., et al. EAU guidelines on chronic pelvic pain. Eur Urol, 2004. 46: 681. 3. Fall, M., et al., EAU Guidelines on Chronic Pelvic Pain, In: EAU Guidelines on Chronic Pelvic Pain. Presented at the 18th EAU Annual Congress Barcelona 2010. 2010, EAU: Arnhem. 4. Fall, M., et al. EAU

2018 European Association of Urology

137. Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence

by a number of organisations in the areas of acute back and musculoskeletal pain and recommendations relevant to the management of acute pain were drawn directly from these. Levels of evidence Levels of evidence were documented according to the NHMRC designation ( NHMRC 1999 GL). Levels of evidence I Evidence obtained from a systematic review of all relevant randomised-controlled trials (RCTs) II Evidence obtained from at least one properly designed randomised-controlled trial III-1 Evidence obtained from (...) of chronic neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury 299 8.2.3 Treatment of nociceptive and visceral pain after spinal cord injury 300 8.3 Acute burns injury pain 301 8.3.1 Management of background nociceptive pain 301 8.3.2 Management of acute neuropathic pain and hyperalgesia 302 8.3.3 Management of procedural pain 302 8.3.4 Regional analgesia for donor site pain management 303 8.3.5 Nonpharmacological pain management 303 8.4 Acute back pain 304 8.5 Acute musculoskeletal pain 306 8.6 Acute medical pain

2015 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

138. Conducting Quality Consultations in Pain Medicine

on. Chris Main and colleagues have explored these issues within the context of back pain consultati ons. They have suggested strategies for improving communicati on. These include an initi al clari? cati on of the pati ent’s objecti ves for the consultati on, establishing the therapeuti c climate, enhancing non-verbal aspects, adopti ng pati ent-friendly terminology, facilitati ng self-disclosure and provision of simple explanati on and realisti c prognosis. Self-management support 11 (...) of a situati on or thought. • Use elaborati ve questi ons… “what else?..” • Looking back or forward… “how were you then?...”, “how do you see your future?..” • Explore values. • Explore goals or mini-goals. • Side-with the negati ve. “Perhaps, you are simply too busy to do a Pain Management Programme….” • A? rmati on: emphasising strengths… “your spine is strong..” • Acknowledge: “I can see you feel very strongly about this….” • Re? ecti ve listening. Consider the concept of re? exivity in the context

2015 Faculty of Pain Medicine

139. Acute pain management: scientific evidence (5th Edition)

status, circumstances and perspectives, which healthcare professionals will then use to help select the treatments that are relevant and appropriate to that patient. Review of the evidence This document is a revision of the second edition of Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence, published in 2005. Therefore, most of the new evidence included in the third edition has been published from January 2005 onwards. Evidence-based guidelines have been published in the areas of acute back (...) : Scientific Evidence xv CONTENTS 9. SPECIFIC CLINICAL SITUATIONS 237 9.1 Postoperative pain 237 9.1.1 Risks of acute postoperative neuropathic pain 237 9.1.2 Acute postamputation pain syndromes 238 9.1.3 Other postoperative pain syndromes 240 9.1.4 Day-stay or short-stay surgery 242 9.1.5 Cranial neurosurgery 245 9.2 Acute pain following spinal cord injury 247 9.3 Acute burn injury pain 249 9.3.1 Management of procedural pain 250 9.3.2 Non-pharmacological pain management 251 9.4 Acute back pain 252 9.5

2020 National Health and Medical Research Council

140. Management of cancer pain

. Deandrea S, Montanari M, Moja L et al. Prevalence of undertreatment in cancer pain. A review of published literature. Ann Oncol 2008; 19(12): 1985–1991. 5. Costantini M, Ripamonti C, Beccaro M et al. Prevalence, distress, management and relief of pain during the last three months of cancer patients’ life. Results of an Italian mortality follow-back survey. Ann Oncol 2009; 20: 729–735. 6. Breivik H, Cherny N, Collett F et al. Cancer-related pain: a pan European survey of prevalence, treatment (...) Management of cancer pain Managementofcancerpain:ESMOClinicalPractice Guidelines † C. I. Ripamonti 1 , D. Santini 2 , E. Maranzano 3 , M. Berti 4 & F. Roila 5 , on behalf of the ESMO Guidelines Working Group * 1 Supportive Care in Cancer Unit, Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy; 2 Oncologia Medica, Università Campus Bio-Medico, Rome, Italy; 3 Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Centre, S. Maria Hospital, Terni, Italy; 4 Anaesthesiology Intensive Care and Pain

2012 European Society for Medical Oncology

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