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1921. Primary cutaneous lymphoma

marginal zone B-cell lymphoma Primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma Primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type a Provisional entities. Table 2. Recommendations for the initial management of CBCL Extent First-line therapy Alternative therapies PCMZL Solitary/localized Local radiotherapy IFN-a i.l. Excision (antibiotics) a Rituximab i.l. Intralesional steroids Multifocal Wait-and-see IFN-a i.l. Local radiotherapy Rituximab i.v Chlorambucil b Topical or intralesional steroids (...) Rituximab i.l. (antibiotics) a PCFCL Solitary/localized Local radiotherapy IFN-a i.l. Excision Rituximab i.l. Multifocal Wait-and-see R-CVP/CHOP c Local radiotherapy Rituximab i.v. PCLBCL, LT Solitary/ localized R-CHOP +/- IFRT Local radiotherapy Rituximab i.v. Multifocal R-CHOP Rituximab i.v. a In case of evidence for B. burgdorferi infection. b Or other single or combination regimens appropriate for low-grade B-cell lymphomas. c In exceptional cases or for patients developing extracutaneous disease

2010 European Society for Medical Oncology

1922. Anal cancer

be made to ensure patients quit smoking before therapy. Tolerance to treatment can be maximized with antibiotics, anti-fungals, anti-emetics, analgesia, skin care, advice regarding nutrition and psychological support. The post-treatment use of vaginal dilators in sexually active females is recommended. response evaluation Clinical response should be assessed at 6–8 weeks after completion of treatment. By this time 60%–85% achieve complete clinical response. The mainstay of clinical evaluation relies

2010 European Society for Medical Oncology

1923. Guidelines for Bone Scintigraphy in Children

on the disease). Also current radiographs and CT or MRI scans, if relevant, should be available for comparison. Pertinent information should be gathered from the child or carer prior to the procedure, including: – Current symptoms – History of fractures, trauma, osteomyelitis, arthritis, neoplasm, metabolic bone disease – History of therapy that might affect the results of bone scintigraphy (e.g. antibiotics) – History of surgery (e.g. presence and location of orthopaedic hardware) that might affect

2010 European Association of Nuclear Medicine

1924. Acne best practice management

, where many patients were either being undertreated or treatment with antibiotic therapy was suboptimal. It is likely that this treatment gap is overestimated due to practical limitations of the audit process; however, the audit revealed a need to address the main sources of apparent divergence from best practice to improve the quality use of acne therapies. Keywords: education, medical, continuing; clinical audit; quality of health care; skin diseases, acne vulgaris The audit t he audit (...) . Appropriate treatment for mild forms involves a topical monotherapy such as salicylic acid, retinoids or bPo . topical antibiotic may be t he audit revealed that GPs are discussing acne, assessing severity and evaluating its psychosocial impact at a frequency above the Table 1. Aggregated performance results of GPs in both cycles compared to the acceptable standards Acceptable standards Cycle 1 (%) (n=1067) Cycle 2 (%) (n=571) p value GP has at some point had a discussion about acne with 80% of adolescent

2010 The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners

1925. Acne best practice management

on 1638 patients. General practitioner management of acne was assessed against a set of preset standards and some acne treatment was found to be inconsistent with best practice, particularly for patients with moderate and moderate to severe acne, where many patients were either being undertreated or treatment with antibiotic therapy was suboptimal. It is likely that this treatment gap is overestimated due to practical limitations of the audit process; however, the audit revealed a need to address

2010 The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners

1926. Guildlines for care of contact dermatitis

patch test series Trolab Chemotechnique Diagnostics Antimicrobial, preservative and antioxidant Bakery Cosmetics Corticosteroid Dental materials Cosmetics Hairdressing Dental screening Medicament (including corticosteroids, antibiotics, local anaesthetics and ophthalmics) Epoxy Metal compounds Fragrance Metalworking/technical oils Hairdressing Perfume and ?avours Isocyanate Photoallergens Leg ulcer Photographic chemicals Medicament Plant Adhesives, dental and other (meth) acrylate Plastics (...) antibiotics, preservative chemicals, fragrances and rubber accelerators. Children with eczematous eruptions should be patch tested, particularly those with hand and eyelid eczema 6 (Quality of evidence II.ii)(Strength of recommendation A). Contact allergy to speci?c allergens has been estimated in the general population to be 4Æ5% for nickel, 7 and 1–3% of the population are allergic to ingredient(s) of a cosmetic. 8 The prevalence of allergy to the other common allergens in the general population

2009 British Association of Dermatologists

1927. Decision Support for Adults Living with Chronic Kidney Disease

renal bone disease n Maintain acid/base and electrolyte balance n Reduce cardiovascular risk factors n Reduce the risk of transplant rejection NOTE: There is a risk of acute decline in kidney function with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, certain doses or types of antibiotics/antimicrobials, and radiographic contrast dye Evaluation and counselling by a registered dietitian is strongly recommended Dietary modifications typically include fluid, protein, potassium and phosphate intake

2009 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

1929. The Role of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) in the Management of Portal Hypertension

of a TIPS in- creasestheriskofhepaticencephalopathybuttheprophy- lactic use of nonabsorbable disaccharides or antibiotics doesnotappeartoreducethisriskandisnotrecommend- ed. 4 The value of TIPS versus a surgical shunt in the pre- vention of variceal rebleeding in patients who have failed medical therapy has been clari?ed by the publication of a controlled trial comparing TIPS to distal splenorenal shunt (DSRS). 5 Both were effective in preventing re- bleeding (rebleeding incidence in 5.5% of DSRS versus (...) of these patients. Therefore repeat cathe- terization of the TIPS or upper endoscopy should be consideredattheone-yearanniversaryofTIPScreation, especially in those who bled from varices. Evidence-II-3 12. ePTFE-covered stents are preferred to bare stents to lower the risk of shunt dysfunction. Evi- dence-I 13. As with any form of portosystemic diversion, the risk of developing hepatic encephalopathy is in- creased following TIPS creation. The prophylactic use of nonabsorbable disaccharides or antibiotics does

2009 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases

1930. Vascular Disorders of the Liver

. Correction of the causal factors, which should be achieved as soon as possible, is beyond the scope of these guidelines. In the presence of fever or leukocytosis, antibiotics have been used, whether bacterial infection was eventually docu- mented. There are reports of recanalization of pylephle- bitis with antibiotic therapy alone. 12,49 Anticoagulation therapy is of proven bene?t in patients with acute DVT. 50 Extrapolation to patients with acute PVT is logical but still not ?rmly validated. There have (...) anticoagulation for patients with acute PVT and thrombus extension distal into the mesenteric veins (Class IIa, Level C). 12. Initiate antibiotics promptly in patients with acute PVT and any evidence of infection (Class I, Level C). Chronic Portal Vein Thrombosis De?nitions. In patients with chronic PVT, also known as portal cavernoma, the obstructed portal vein is replaced by a network of hepatopetal collateral veins con- necting the patent portion of the vein upstream from the thrombus to the patent portion

2009 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases

1931. Position statement for credentialing & quality assurance in endoscopy

. These include departures from hospital policy or accepted standards of care, as well as major proceduraladverseevents(complications).Thesecanbeadverse outcomes of sedation or of the procedure itself, such as cardio- pulmonary compromise, bleeding, perforation, or infections or procedure-specificeventssuch aspost-ERCP pancreatitis. Exam- plesofdeparturesfromhospitalpolicyincludeinappropriateuse of prophylactic antibiotics, inappropriate procedures, lack of written informed consent, inadequate or delayed

2009 World Endoscopy Organization

1933. The Provision of Oral Care under General Anaesthesia in Special Care Dentistry - A Professional Consensus Statement

examination. 22 • Where it has not been possible for a patient to cooperate with a pre- anaesthetic examination an extra-oral and intra-oral examination and full charting and radiographs as necessary are completed under general anaesthesia to formulate an initial treatment plan. • Antimicrobial prophylaxis is used according to current national guidelines. • Where possible consult and discuss with carers and/or family any proposed treatment plan. • The treatment plan takes into consideration aftercare (...) . analgesics, antibiotics, mouthwash) may be prescribed if thought necessary and clear instructions given on its administration. • Specific instructions regarding mouth care after surgery should be given by a dental surgeon. • If sutures have been placed, guidance should be given as to the type of suture material used and how, if necessary, they will be removed together with any specific instructions relating to the surgical procedure. • Instruction should be given on the insertion, removal and cleaning

2009 British Society for Disability and Oral Health

1934. Sexual and Reproductive Health for Individuals with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

disease but may be reduced in women with Crohn’s disease who have small bowel disease and malabsorption. Health professionals should consider the impact of IBD-associated conditions such as venous thromboembolism, primary sclerosing cholangitis and osteoporosis, and other medical conditions when prescribing contraception to women with IBD. Women using combined hormonal contraception should use additional contraception while taking antibiotic courses of less than 3 weeks, and for 7 days after (...) the antibiotic has been discontinued. Health professionals should check whether any prescribed medications for rectal or genital administration contain products that may reduce the efficacy of condoms. Women with IBD should stop COC at least 4 weeks before major elective surgery and alternative contraception should be provided. Advice regarding recommencing COC should be given individually. Laparoscopic sterilisation is an inappropriate method of contraception for women with IBD who have had previous pelvic

2009 Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland

1935. EANM-EORTC general recommendations for sentinel node diagnostics in melanoma

to use drains or prophylactic antibiotics peroperatively [135]. When the hot and/or blue SNs have been removed, it is recommended to check for residual radioactivity of the lymphatic basin, and with the finger to identify possible large hard non-blue and non-radioactive nodes (especial- ly if no pre-operative US is performed). These may be SNs full of metastatic cells and thereby no longer capable of receiving any lymph drainage from the primary tumour site [3] and should therefore be removed as well

2009 European Association of Nuclear Medicine

1936. Surgical site infections: prevention and treatment

(surgical) procedure. Other types of healthcare-associated infections that mainly affect surgical patients are postoperative respiratory and urinary tract infections, bacteraemias (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections and intravascular cannula infections) and antibiotic-related diarrhoeas (particularly Clostridium difficile enteritis). Surgical site infections have been shown to compose up to 20% of all of healthcare-associated infections. At least 5% of patients undergoing (...) to Surgical site infections: prevention and treatment (CG74) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 4 of 20inform their decisions for individual patients. In addition, published identified characteristics of appropriate interactive dressings and antimicrobial products should be considered before use, and local formularies and guidelines based on local microbial resistance patterns should be used to inform choice

2008 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

1937. Otitis media with effusion in under 12s: surgery

is recommended. Adjuvant adenoidectomy is not recommended in the absence of persistent and/or frequent upper respiratory tract symptoms. Non-surgical interv Non-surgical interventions entions The following treatments are not recommended for the management of OME: antibiotics topical or systemic antihistamines topical or systemic decongestants topical or systemic steroids homeopathy cranial osteopathy acupuncture dietary modification, including probiotics immunostimulants massage. Hearing aids should (...) upper respiratory tract symptoms. 1.5.2 Children who have undergone insertion of ventilation tubes for OME should be followed up and their hearing should be re-assessed. 1.6 Non-surgical interventions 1.6.1 The following treatments are not recommended for the management of OME: antibiotics topical or systemic antihistamines topical or systemic decongestants topical or systemic steroids homeopathy cranial osteopathy acupuncture dietary modification, including probiotics immunostimulants massage

2008 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

1938. Inducing labour

. In some such pregnancies, labour begins spontaneously at a variable interval after the membranes have ruptured, avoiding the need for induction. The value of antibiotic therapy and the administration of corticosteroids to the woman is Inducing labour (CG70) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 24 of 35unclear in this situation. A randomised study of active versus expectant management, taking account of time

2008 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

1939. Urinary tract infection in under 16s: diagnosis and management

be referred immediately to the care of a paediatric specialist. Treatment should be with parenteral antibiotics in line with the NICE guideline on fever in under 5s. [2007] [2007] 1.2.1.3 For infants and children 3 months or older with acute pyelonephritis/upper urinary tract infection: consider referral to a paediatric specialist treat with antibiotics in line with the NICE guideline on pyelonephritis (acute): antimicrobial prescribing. [2007, amended 2018] [2007, amended 2018] 1.2.1.4 For infants (...) and children 3 months or older with cystitis/lower urinary tract infection: treat with antibiotics in line with the NICE guideline on urinary tract infection (lower): antimicrobial prescribing. [2007, amended 2018] [2007, amended 2018] 1.2.1.5 This recommendation has been replaced by the NICE guideline on pyelonephritis (acute): antimicrobial prescribing. 1.2.1.6 This recommendation has been replaced by the NICE guideline on pyelonephritis (acute): antimicrobial prescribing. 1.2.1.7 This recommendation has

2007 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

1940. Atopic eczema in under 12s: diagnosis and management

#notice-of-rights). Page 23 of 401.5.7.3 Healthcare professionals should only take swabs from infected lesions of atopic eczema in children if they suspect microorganisms other than Staphylococcus aureus to be present, or if they think antibiotic resistance is relevant. 1.5.7.4 Systemic antibiotics that are active against Staphylococcus aureus and streptococcus should be used to treat widespread bacterial infections of atopic eczema in children for 1–2 weeks according to clinical response. 1.5.7.5 (...) Flucloxacillin should be used as the first-line treatment for bacterial infections in children with atopic eczema for both Staphylococcus aureus and streptococcal infections. Erythromycin should be used in children who are allergic to flucloxacillin or in the case of flucloxacillin resistance. Clarithromycin should be used if erythromycin is not well tolerated. 1.5.7.6 The use of topical antibiotics in children with atopic eczema, including those combined with topical corticosteroids, should be reserved

2007 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

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