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1701. Meningitis (bacterial) and menigococcal septicaemia in under 16s: recognition, diagnosis and management

meningitis without non-blanching r Suspected bacterial meningitis without non-blanching rash ash 1.2.2 Transfer children and young people with suspected bacterial meningitis without non-blanching rash directly to secondary care without giving parenteral antibiotics. 1.2.3 If urgent transfer to hospital is not possible (for example, in remote locations or adverse weather conditions), administer antibiotics to children and young people with suspected bacterial meningitis. Suspected meningococcal disease (...) (meningitis with non-blanching r Suspected meningococcal disease (meningitis with non-blanching rash or ash or meningococcal septicaemia) meningococcal septicaemia) 1.2.4 Give parenteral antibiotics (intramuscular or intravenous benzylpenicillin) at the earliest opportunity, either in primary or secondary care, but do not delay urgent transfer to hospital to give the parenteral antibiotics. 1.2.5 Withhold benzylpenicillin only in children and young people who have a clear history of anaphylaxis after

2010 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

1702. Alcohol-use disorders: diagnosis and management of physical complications

Offer coeliac axis block, splanchnicectomy or surgery to people with poorly controlled pain from small-duct (non-obstructive) chronic alcohol-related pancreatitis. [2010] [2010] 1.4.3 1.4.3 Proph Prophylactic antibiotics for acute alcohol-related pancreatitis ylactic antibiotics for acute alcohol-related pancreatitis 1.4.3.1 Do not give prophylactic antibiotics to people with mild acute alcohol-related pancreatitis, unless otherwise indicated. [2010] [2010] 1.4.4 1.4.4 Nutritional support for acute

2010 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

1703. Pan-Asian adapted ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines for the management of patients with metastatic gastric cancer

. These trends have been dominated by a decline in the occurrence of NCGC and are thought to be attributable to the decline inH.pylori infections [5] due to improved sanitation and the availability of antibiotics. In addition, the availability of fresh produce, less reliance on salt- preserved foods [6], and a reduction in smoking may also have contributed to the declines [7]. Conversely, the rates of CGC and cancers of the gastro-oesophageal junction (GEJ) are increasing in the United States, and many

2014 European Society for Medical Oncology

1704. Tinnitus in Children and Teenagers

medications; examples being: chemotherapy for childhood cancers, or high dose intravenous antibiotics for severe infection. Other general medical problems might be relevant; for example, migraine can be associated with auditory sensitivity and tinnitus. Factors affecting tinnitus Some children and their parents have already noticed things that make tinnitus better or worse. Parents may have noticed that their child’s tinnitus is affected by illness, stress, tiredness, or important life events, or improves

2014 British Society of Audiology

1705. Advanced Care Planning

? Intensivecareonanintensivecareunit ? Dialysis ? Antibiotics ? Chemotherapy ? Radiotherapy ? Surgery ? Arti?cialnutritionincludingtubefeeding ? Intravenoushydration ? Admissiontoahospital ? Other: I appoint as Substitute Decision Maker who may express my wishesandrights,ifIamunabletoexpressthemmyself: Identi?cation: Mr/Mrs (name,surname) Address: Contact information: Identi?cation number: The person of this advanced care planning document is otherwise able to express his/her will but is unable to write due to: and asks

2014 European Society for Medical Oncology

1706. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

, and thereby limit the effects of chronic anaemia, especially on QoL [IV, A]. Except in patients receiving myelosuppressive drugs, prophy- lactic platelet transfusions are less used than RBC transfusions in MDS, especially in the long term. Likewise, prophylactic anti- biotics and/or G-CSF are not recommended in case of neutro- paenia, as they have not shown any impact on survival, but rapid onset of broad spectrum antibiotics is mandatory in these patients in case of fever or symptoms of infection. Short

2014 European Society for Medical Oncology

1707. Myelodysplastic Syndromes: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines

, and thereby limit the effects of chronic anaemia, especially on QoL [IV, A]. Except in patients receiving myelosuppressive drugs, prophy- lactic platelet transfusions are less used than RBC transfusions in MDS, especially in the long term. Likewise, prophylactic anti- biotics and/or G-CSF are not recommended in case of neutro- paenia, as they have not shown any impact on survival, but rapid onset of broad spectrum antibiotics is mandatory in these patients in case of fever or symptoms of infection. Short

2014 European Society for Medical Oncology

1708. HIV-associated malignancies

) than the R-CHOP study (1998–2002), suggesting other variables, including supportive care and antiretroviral drug options, mayhavediffered.Consistentwiththis,thepatientstreated with R-EPOCH routinely received concurrent antifungal and antibacterial prophylaxis, which was omitted from those treated earlier with R-CHOP. The AMC have recently reported the results of a pro- spective, multicentre Phase II trial of R-CHOP, but with pegylated, liposomal doxorubicin in order to limit toxicity. Of note

2014 British HIV Association

1710. Commissioning guide for colonic diverticular disease

? If patients are deemed suitable for home management, this should be in accordance to NICE guidelines with suitable analgesics (paracetamol rather than non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and clear liquids for 2-3 days ? There is low level evidence that patients suitable for management at home may be managed without the use of antibiotics. However, in general, a course of oral antibiotics is recommended. If adequate support is available (for example through use of an out-patient parenteral antimicrobial (...) present, symptoms can range from intermittent mild abdominal discomfort through to life-threatening problems such as bleeding and perforation. Patients with suspected diverticular inflammation (diverticulitis) may be treated at home or in hospital. Treatment is normally with a course of antibiotics, with emergency admission to hospital normally being required if intravenous antibiotics are required. With more severe infections, acute complications such as bowel perforation or abscess formation may

2014 Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland

1711. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute and chronic rhinosinusitis

to respond to initial therapy within 72 hours of administration. If failure occurs following use of INCS as monotherapy, antibacterial therapy should be administered. If failure occurs following antibiotic administration, it may be due to lack of sensitivity to, or bacterial resistance to, the antibiotic, and the antibiotic class should be changed. Option Strong 14: Adjunct therapy should be prescribed in individuals with ABRS. Option Strong 15 . Topical INCS may help improve resolution rates and improve (...) of adverse events (OR = 1.94, 95% CI, 1.29-2.92) for the antibiotic group versus the placebo group. Although antimicrobial therapy is recommended for the management of ABRS, this recommendation is not without controversy [ , , – ]. In a meta-analysis of studies enrolling patients with suspected ABRS not confirmed by imaging, laboratory testing, or cultures, analysis of individual patient data resulted in an OR of 1.37 (95% CI, 1.13 to 1.66) for antibiotic use versus placebo [ ]. The calculated number

2011 CPG Infobase

1712. Fever in the returning international traveller: Initial assessment guidelines

for specific cases in which the benefits of these antibiotics are felt to exceed the potential risks (permanent dental staining, arthropathy). Consultation with a specialist experienced in the treatment of pediatric tropical diseases should be considered. *3-day regimen for suspected travellers’ diarrhea; 7-10-day regimen for suspected enteric fever **this will also cover leptospirosis Appendix I. Specific tests to rule out common travel-acquired infections that can cause fever Travel-acquired infection (...) Blood culture x 2 (caution if the patient has received antibiotics as they may have negative blood cultures) Stool culture (Bone marrow aspirate and culture) Skin and soft tissue infection Clinical diagnosis Skin swab for methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA) if exudative If ulcerative, smears for Giemsa-stain, biopsy or aspirate for Leishmania culture or PCR; consider skin swab to rule out ecthyma ulcer due to Staphylococcus or Pseudomonas

2011 CPG Infobase

1713. Statement on older travellers

or cefotaxime) could be considered. Similarly , use of doxycycline and ciprofloxacin is not routine in children and generally reserved for specific cases in which the benefits of these antibiotics are felt to exceed the potential risks (permanent dental staining, arthropathy). Consultation with a specialist experienced in the treatment of pediatric tropical diseases should be considered. *3-day regimen for suspected travellers’ diarrhea; 7-10-day regimen for suspected enteric fever **this will also cover (...) , Coccidioides as directed by index of suspicion and travel exposures; urinary antigen for Histoplasma) Dengue 1. Acute and convalescent sera (2 weeks after) for dengue IgM and IgG Enteric fever due to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi or Paratyphi 1. Blood culture x 2 (caution if the patient has received antibiotics as they may have negative blood cultures) 2. Stool culture 3. (Bone marrow aspirate and culture) Skin and soft tissue infection 1. Clinical diagnosis 2. Skin swab for methicillin-susceptible

2011 CPG Infobase

1715. Management of atopic eczema in primary care

the patient and family members) should be considered in patients with recurrent infection. ; In patients with atypical features, or where there is concern about possible streptococcal infection, skin swabs of affected areas should be considered. 8.2 effectiveneSS of antiMicroBial MeaSureS 8.2.1 ORAL ANTIBIOTICS In a Cochrane review oral antibiotics were not associated with benefit in patients with non- infected eczema (2 trials, 66 participants) or infected eczema (1 trial, 33 participants). 41 B oral (...) , a systematic review found no clear evidence that topical antibiotics combined with TCS provided clinical benefit in AE treatment compared to TCS alone. Overall methodological quality of trials was poor and it is not possible to provide an evidence based recommendation for practice. 41 8.2.3 ANTISEPTICS A Cochrane review identified a small number of diverse studies and found no benefit for antibacterial soaps, bath additives or topical antibiotics/antiseptics in the treatment of atopic eczema. 41 8

2011 SIGN

1716. Identification and management for ambulance personnel - Ireland

that antibiotics are offered to any contacts of the case whose exposure puts them at particularly increased risk of infection. Meningococcal disease is the leading infectious cause of death in children and can kill a healthy person of any age within hours of their first symptoms. There are two main clinical presentations: meningitis and septicaemia. These can occur on their own, but often occur together. Septicaemia in the absence of signs of meningitis can be even more life-threatening than meningitis alone

2013 Meningitis Research Foundation

1717. EANM/SNMMI Guideline for 18F-FDG Use in Inflammation and Infection

imaging should be scheduled for late morning. Detailed instructions can befoundintheEANMguidelinesfortumorimaging. It is strongly advised that commencement of steroid treatmentbeavoidedbetweentherequestdateforthe study and the appointment. The use of steroid treat- mentcouldresultinafalse-negativeresult,especially in giant cell arteritis and other systemic vasculitides (126). Because the effect of antibiotics on 18 F-FDG uptake is unknown, it is important to be aware of ongoing antibiotic treatment

2013 European Association of Nuclear Medicine

1718. Primary cutaneous lymphoma Full Text available with Trip Pro

,threemaintypesofCBCL aredistinguished:primarycutaneousmarginalzonelymphoma Table4. RecommendationsfortheinitialmanagementofCBCL Extent First-linetherapy Alternativetherapies PCMZL Solitary/localised Localradiotherapy Excision (Antibiotics) a IFNalphai.l. Rituximabi.l. Intralesionalsteroids Multifocal Waitandsee Localradiotherapy Chlorambucil b Rituximabi.v. (Antibiotics) a IFNalphai.l. Rituximabi.l. Topicalorintralesionalsteroids PCFCL Solitary/localised Localradiotherapy Excision IFNalphai.l. Rituximabi.l

2013 European Society for Medical Oncology

1719. Prostate Cancer Multi-disciplinary Team

can cause an increase in PSA concentration, which can be reduced to within a normal range with antibiotic treatment [Tchetgen MB, et al 1997; Gamé X, et al 2003]. Prostate size – a benignly enlarged gland can influence PSA concentrations. Infection – elevated PSA levels can be sometimes be seen with febrile urinary tract infections. Free and complexed PSA should be understood. Catalona et al. conclude that percentage free PSA is most useful in men with a PSA concentration in the range 2-15 ng/ml (...) (as recommended by The British Prostate Testing for Cancer and Treatment Study) [Donovan J, et al 2003] should be obtained, according to the volume of the prostate. Biopsies should be performed under local anaesthetic and antibiotic cover [Eskicorapci SY, et al 2004]. • For each biopsy site, the number of biopsies positive for carcinoma and the International Society of Urologic Pathology (ISUP) 2005 Gleason score should be reported [Epstein JI, et al 2005]. The amount of cancer in each core should also

2013 British Association of Urological Surgeons

1720. Postpartum Nursing Care Pathway

fected • ar ea (massage thr ough feed) Shower or warm compresses to affected area • prior to feeds based on woman’s preference After feeds – cool compresses • Analgesic • If symptoms do not resolve >24hr refer to • PHCP Antibiotics may be indicated if not resolved in • 24 hours 33 Refer to: Baby’s Best Chance Best Chance Website – www.bestchance.gov.bc.ca Physiological Health: breastsPhysiological Assessment 0 – 2 hours Period of Stability (POS) >2 – 24 hours >24 – 72 hours >72 hours – 7 days (...) and beyond bReASt S (Continued) Variance – nipple Candida (fungus Infection) Yeast Sore burning nipples • Sore all the time but worse when feeding • Deep burning/shooting pain • Itchy , flaky nipples • Tiny blisters • Deep pink/bright red nipples/areola • Mother may have recently been on antibiotics or has a yeast infection • (infant may have signs of Candida in mouth or perineal ar ea) 34 Intervention – nipple Candida (fungus Infection) Yeast Differentiate from poor latch • Frequent hand washing

2011 British Columbia Perinatal Health Program

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