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81. Topical Antimicrobials and the Open Surgical Wound

are used extensively in clinical practice, evidence to support the use of topical antimicrobial agents remains limited. Patients and Methods: The world literature on the use of antiseptic and antibiotic agents was evaluated to determine the current status of evidence to support the use of topical antimicrobial agents in the prevention of surgical site infections. Results: Although several techniques of using topical antibiotic solutions, powders, antibiotic gauzes, and beads have some evidence (...) Topical Antimicrobials and the Open Surgical Wound Topical Antimicrobials and the Open Surgical Wound | Surgical Infections Login to your account Username Password Keep me logged in Change Password Old Password New Password Password Changed Successfully Your

2016 Surgical Infection Society

82. Antimicrobial Formulation and Delivery in the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection

antibiotics, skin incision antibacterial sealants, and antimicrobial dressings. It is the purpose of this review to study the evidence behind each of these measures and to evaluate relevant data for recommendations in each area. Methods: A systematic review of the literature through PubMed was performed. Results: Need for adequate dosing and re-dosing of intravenous peri-operative antibiotics, duration of antibiotic usage past wound closure, and the use of antibiotic bowel preparation in colorectal (...) Administration Boston Health Care System, West Roxbury, Massachusetts. Department of Surgery, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. Published Online: 20 May 2016 Abstract Background: A number of adjunct antimicrobial measures have been studied in an attempt to reduce surgical site infection (SSI) rates. In addition to parenteral antibiotic prophylaxis, these measures include oral antibiotics in bowel preparation for colorectal surgery, antiseptic/antimicrobial irrigation, antimicrobial sutures, local

2016 Surgical Infection Society

83. Antimicrobial Bowel Preparation for Elective Colon Surgery

Antimicrobial Bowel Preparation for Elective Colon Surgery Antimicrobial Bowel Preparation for Elective Colon Surgery | Surgical Infections Login to your account Username Password Keep me logged in Change Password Old Password New Password Password Changed (...) Background: Mechanical bowel preparation continues to be a controversial subject for the pre-operative management of patients undergoing elective colon resection. Methods: The English literature on bowel preparation was searched to identify pertinent publications. Results: The published literature over the past 80 y confirms that mechanical bowel preparation alone does not reduce surgical site infections. However, the use of appropriate oral antibiotics following mechanical bowel preparation with pre

2016 Surgical Infection Society

84. Duration of Antimicrobial Therapy in Treating Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infections: A Comprehensive Review

. An adequate duration of antimicrobial therapy is important to optimize empiric therapy and minimize selective pressures favoring antimicrobial resistance. Methods: The optimal duration of antibiotic therapy for intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) has been debated in the last years. A literature research, based on PubMed database and limited to English language publications, was performed without restriction of time or type of manuscript. Results: In stable patients a short course of antimicrobial therapy (3 (...) respect the basic principles of antibiotic treatment. Duration of antimicrobial treatment is an important variable to evaluate in treating complicated intra-abdominal infections. , , , , and 24 January 2019 | Surgical Infections, Vol. 0, No. 0 , , , and 18 September 2018 | OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology, Vol. 22, No. 9 23 June 2017 , , , , and 1 February 2017 | Surgical Infections Case Reports, Vol. 2, No. 1 8 February 2017 | BMC Infectious Diseases, Vol. 17, No. 1 10 July 2017 | World

2016 Surgical Infection Society

85. Antimicrobial stewardship in daily practice: Managing an important resource

stewardship part of everyday hospital and outpatient practice. Vital components of antimicrobial stewardship include appropriate testing to diagnose whether infections are viral or bacterial, and using clinical follow-up rather than antibiotics in cases in which the child is not very ill and uncertainty exists. Other specific, important actions include questioning whether positive urine cultures are contaminated when there is no evidence of pyuria or inflammatory changes, and obtaining a chest radiograph (...) Antimicrobial stewardship in daily practice: Managing an important resource Antimicrobial stewardship is a recent concept that embodies the practical, judicious use of antimicrobials to decrease adverse outcomes from antimicrobials while optimizing the treatment of bacterial infections to reduce the emergence of resistant pathogens. The objectives of the present statement are to illustrate the principles of antimicrobial stewardship and to offer practical examples of how to make antimicrobial

2014 Canadian Paediatric Society

86. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Antimicrobial Prophylaxis in Surgery Full Text available with Trip Pro

be expected to be quite small with single-dose antibiotic prophylaxis. Although the use of fluoroquinolones may be necessary for surgical antibiotic prophylaxis in some children, they are not drugs of first choice in the pediatric population due to an increased incidence of adverse events as compared with controls in some clinical trials. k Ceftriaxone use should be limited to patients requiring antimicrobial treatment for acute cholecystitis or acute biliary tract infections which may not be determined (...) with negative pretransplantation cultures should receive antimicrobial prophylaxis as appropriate for other types of cardiothoracic surgeries. Patients undergoing lung transplantation for cystic fibrosis should receive 7–14 days of treatment with antimicrobials selected according to pretransplantation culture and susceptibility results. This treatment may include additional antibacterial or antifungal agents. t The prophylactic regimen may need to be modified to provide coverage against any potential

2013 Infectious Diseases Society of America

87. Open Fractures, Prophylactic Antibiotic Use in ? Update

Open Fractures, Prophylactic Antibiotic Use in ? Update Open Fractures, Prophylactic Antibiotic Use in — Update - Practice Management Guideline Search » Open Fractures, Prophylactic Antibiotic Use in — Update Published 2011 Citation: Authors Hoff, William S. MD, FACS; Bonadies, John A. MD, FACS; Cachecho, Riad MD, FACS, FCCP; Dorlac, Warren C. MD, FACS Author Information From the Division of Trauma (W.S.H.), St. Luke's Hospital, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania; Department of Surgery (J.A.B.), Hospital (...) open fractures. In general, risk of infection and incidence of limb loss correlate with the Gustilo type (Table 1). Process By using a search methodology similar to Luchette et al., [3] a MEDLINE search was performed using the key words “open fractures” and “antibiotics.” This search was limited to articles published subsequent to the guidelines published by Luchette et al. This search yielded a total of 49 articles. Sixteen articles were excluded for the following reasons: technical article (6

2011 Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma

88. Urologic Surgery Antimicrobial Prophylaxis

) Patient Safety and Quality of Care Accreditations and Reporting Patient Education Urologic Surgery Antimicrobial Prophylaxis [pdf] [pdf] Panel Members J. Stuart Wolf, Jr., MD, Chairman; Carol J. Bennett, MD; Roger R. Dmochowski, MD; Brent K. Hollenbeck, MD, MS; Margaret S. Pearle, MD, PhD; Anthony J. Schaeffer, MD Additional Update Panel Member(s): Kenneth T. Pace, MD Note to the Reader: (7/29/16): "On July 26, 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved of flouroquinolone antibacterial (...) Urologic Surgery Antimicrobial Prophylaxis Urologic Surgery Antimicrobial Prophylaxis - American Urological Association advertisement Toggle navigation About Us About the AUA Membership AUA Governance Industry Relations Education AUAUniversity Education Products & Resources Normal Histology and Important Histo-anatomic Structures Urinary Bladder Prostate Kidney Renovascular Diseases Andrenal Gland Testis Paratesticular Tumors Penis Retroperitoneum Cytology Online Learning For Medical Students

2012 American Urological Association

89. Antibiotic therapy in preterm premature rupture of the membranes.

Antibiotic therapy in preterm premature rupture of the membranes. Guidelines and Measures | Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality HHS.gov Search ahrq.gov Search ahrq.gov Menu Topics A - Z Healthcare Delivery Latest available findings on quality of and access to health care Searchable database of AHRQ Grants, Working Papers & HHS Recovery Act Projects AHRQ Projects funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund You are here Guidelines and Measures Funding for the National

2010 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

90. Guidelines for Antimicrobial Treatment of Acute Uncomplicated Cystitis and Pyelonephritis in Women Full Text available with Trip Pro

Guidelines for Antimicrobial Treatment of Acute Uncomplicated Cystitis and Pyelonephritis in Women We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. International Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Acute Uncomplicated Cystitis and Pyelonephritis in Women: A 2010 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the European Society (...) for Academic Emergency Medicine. The focus of this work is treatment of women with acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis, diagnoses limited in these guidelines to premenopausal, non-pregnant women with no known urological abnormalities or co-morbidities. The issues of in vitro resistance prevalence and the ecological adverse effects of antimicrobial therapy (collateral damage) were considered as important factors in making optimal treatment choices and thus are reflected in the rankings

2011 Infectious Diseases Society of America

91. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Use of Antimicrobial Agents in Neutropenic Patients with Cancer Full Text available with Trip Pro

chemotherapy-induced fever and neutropenia. Recent advances in antimicrobial drug development and technology, clinical trial results, and extensive clinical experience have informed the approaches and recommendations herein. Because the previous iteration of this guideline in 2002, we have a developed a clearer definition of which populations of patients with cancer may benefit most from antibiotic, antifungal, and antiviral prophylaxis. Furthermore, categorizing neutropenic patients as being at high risk (...) Is Appropriate and in What Venue? Recommendations General Considerations 9. High-risk patients require hospitalization for IV empirical antibiotic therapy; monotherapy with an anti-pseudomonal β-lactam agent, such as cefepime, a carbapenem (meropenem or imipenem-cilastatin), or piperacillin-tazobactam, is recommended (A-I) . Other antimicrobials (aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and/or vancomycin) may be added to the initial regimen for management of complications (eg, hypotension and pneumonia

2010 Infectious Diseases Society of America

92. Joint replacement (primary): hip, knee and shoulder

that the use of antibiotic and antiseptic agents in wash-out solutions varies across the NHS. They were concerned about the risk of increasing antimicrobial resistance through the use of these agents. They agreed that, because of this risk, other means of preventing infection in joint replacement surgery, such as prophylactic antibiotics and ultra-clean air ventilation in operating theatres, should be used, and included a cross reference to the NICE guideline on surgical site infections. Ultra-clean air (...) tranexamic acid on its own. For a short explanation of why the committee made the recommendations on tranexamic acid to minimise blood loss and how they might affect practice, see rationale and impact. Full details of the evidence and the committee's discussion are in evidence review G: tranexamic acid to minimise blood loss. 1.5 1.5 Preventing infections Preventing infections Antibiotic or antiseptic agents in wound wash-out solutions Antibiotic or antiseptic agents in wound wash-out solutions 1.5.1

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

93. COVID-19 rapid guideline: community-based care of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 13Contents Contents Overview 4 1 Communicating with patients and minimising risk 5 Patients not known to have COVID-19 6 Patients known or suspected to have COVID-19 6 2 Treatment and care planning 8 Corticosteroids 8 Self-management for exacerbations 9 Smoking cessation 9 Pulmonary rehabilitation 9 Oxygen 9 Oral prophylactic antibiotic therapy 9 Airway clearance 10 3 Equipment 11 4 Modifications (...) for exacerbations Self-management for exacerbations 2.8 T ell patients that if they think they are having an exacerbation, they should follow their individualised COPD self-management plan and start a course of oral corticosteroids and/or antibiotics if clinically indicated. 2.9 T ell patients not to start a short course of oral corticosteroids and/or antibiotics for symptoms of COVID-19, for example fever, dry cough or myalgia. 2.10 Do not offer patients with COPD a short course of oral corticosteroids

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

94. COVID-19 rapid guideline: cystic fibrosis

assistance. This is because sputum generation is a potentially infectious aerosol generating procedure for COVID-19. Advise other family members not to enter the room until enough time has passed for aerosols to clear: follow UK government guidance on infection prevention and control. 1.14 Explain to patients, their families and carers that when a nebuliser is used to administer an antibiotic, the aerosol comes from the fluid in the nebuliser chamber and will not carry virus particles from the patient. T (...) patients, their families and carers to continue with all their usual self-care arrangements including, for example: • airway clearance techniques • prophylactic medication, including oral and inhaled antibiotics, and mucoactive agents • cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) therapies • diet, vitamins and pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy • home exercise (following UK government guidance on shielding and protecting people defined on medical grounds as extremely vulnerable from

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

95. COVID-19 rapid guideline: delivery of systemic anticancer treatments

and offering empiric antibiotic therapy immediately. 4.6 If COVID-19 is later diagnosed in someone not isolated from admission or presentation, follow UK government guidance on actions required when a case was not diagnosed on admission. © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 8 of 135 5 Staff who are self-isolating Staff who are self-isolating 5.1 If a healthcare professional needs to self-isolate, ensure

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

96. COVID-19 rapid guideline: delivery of radiotherapy

sepsis as an acute medical emergency and offering empiric antibiotic therapy immediately. 4.5 If COVID-19 is later diagnosed in someone not isolated from admission or presentation, follow UK government guidance on actions required when a case was not diagnosed on admission. COVID-19 rapid guideline: delivery of radiotherapy (NG162) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 9 of 155 5 Grouping and separating

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

97. COVID-19 rapid guideline: managing suspected or confirmed pneumonia in adults in the community

is likely to be the cause and • symptoms are mild. Inappropriate antibiotic use may reduce availability if used indiscriminately, and broad-spectrum antibiotics in particular may lead to Clostridioides difficile infection and antimicrobial resistance. 4.7 Offer an oral antibiotic for treatment of pneumonia in people who can or wish to be treated in the community if: • the likely cause is bacterial or • it is unclear whether the cause is bacterial or viral and symptoms are more concerning (...) a day for 5 days. 4.9 Do not routinely use dual antibiotics. 4.10 For choice of antibiotics in penicillin allergy, pregnancy and more severe disease, or if atypical pathogens are likely, see the recommendations on choice of antibiotic in the NICE antimicrobial prescribing guideline on community- acquired pneumonia. COVID-19 rapid guideline: managing suspected or confirmed pneumonia in adults in the community (NG165) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

98. COVID-19 rapid guideline: haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

neutropenic sepsis immediately for assessment in secondary or tertiary care • treating suspected neutropenic sepsis as an acute medical emergency and offering empiric antibiotic therapy immediately. 2.4 If COVID-19 is later diagnosed in a patient not isolated from admission or presentation, follow UK government guidance for health professionals. 2.5 If a patient not previously known or suspected to have COVID-19 shows new symptoms suggestive of COVID-19, the general advice is to follow UK government

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

99. Urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse in women: management

of urinary tract infection (UTI) and their urine tests positive for both leucocytes and nitrites, send a midstream urine specimen for culture and analysis of antibiotic sensitivities. Prescribe an appropriate course of antibiotic treatment pending culture results. See the NICE guideline on urinary tract infection (lower): antimicrobial prescribing for more information. [2006, amended 2019] [2006, amended 2019] 1.3.7 If women have symptoms of UTI and their urine tests negative for either leucocytes (...) or nitrites, send a midstream urine specimen for culture and analysis of antibiotic sensitivities. Consider the prescription of antibiotics pending culture results. [2006] [2006] 1.3.8 If women do not have symptoms of UTI, but their urine tests positive for both leucocytes and nitrites, do not offer antibiotics without the results of midstream urine culture. [2006] [2006] Urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse in women: management (NG123) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

100. Crohn’s disease: management

not responded to conventional therapy (including antibiotics, drainage and immunosuppressive treatments), or who are intolerant of or have contraindications to conventional therapy. Infliximab should be given as a planned course of treatment until treatment failure (including the need for surgery) or until 12 months after the start of treatment, whichever is shorter. People should then have their disease reassessed (see recommendation 1.2.16) to determine whether ongoing treatment is still clinically (...) of drug treatment are to reduce symptoms, promote mucosal healing, and maintain or improve quality of life, while minimising toxicity related to drugs over both the short- and long-term. Glucocorticosteroid treatment, aminosalicylate treatment, antibiotics, immunosuppressants and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha inhibitors are currently considered to be options for treating Crohn's disease. Enteral nutrition has also been used widely as first-line therapy in children and young people to facilitate

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

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