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21. Cough (acute): antimicrobial prescribing

1.1 Managing acute cough 5 1.2 Self-care 8 1.3 Choice of antibiotic 9 T erms used in the guideline 11 Acute cough 11 Acute bronchitis 11 Self-care treatments 11 Summary of the evidence 12 Self-care 12 Bronchodilators 22 Corticosteroids 23 Mucolytics 24 No antibiotic 25 Back-up antibiotics 29 Choice of antibiotic 33 Antibiotic course length 35 Other considerations 36 Medicines adherence 36 Resource implications 36 Cough (acute): antimicrobial prescribing (NG120) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved (...) . Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 36Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for acute cough associated with an upper respiratory tract infection or acute bronchitis in adults, young people and children. It aims to limit antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 2-page visual summary of the recommendations, including tables to support prescribing decisions. For treating coughs

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

22. Bronchiectasis (non-cystic fibrosis), acute exacerbation: antimicrobial prescribing

Reassessment 14 Referral and seeking specialist advice 14 Choice of antibiotic for treating an acute exacerbation of bronchiectasis 15 Preventing acute exacerbations of bronchiectasis (non-cystic fibrosis) and choice of antibiotic 17 Bronchiectasis (non-cystic fibrosis), acute exacerbation: antimicrobial prescribing (NG117) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 19Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out (...) an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for managing and preventing acute exacerbations of bronchiectasis (non-cystic fibrosis). It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 3-page visual summary of the recommendations, including tables to support prescribing decisions. NICE has also produced a guideline on antimicrobial stewardship: systems and processes for effective antimicrobial medicine use. Who is it for? Health professionals People with bronchiectasis, their families

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

23. Superficial Bacterial Skin Infections - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Antibiotics for impetigo and folliculitis

Superficial Bacterial Skin Infections - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Antibiotics for impetigo and folliculitis Superficial Bacterial Skin Infections - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Antibiotics for impetigo and folliculitis - medSask Home - College of Pharmacy and Nutrition - University of Saskatchewan Toggle Menu Search the U of S Search Superficial Bacterial Skin Infections - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Antibiotics for impetigo and folliculitis The skin has an effective (...) itchy, papules and/or pustules at the base of the hair shaft. The causative agent is usually aureus . Furuncles or boils usually begin as folliculitis which spreads and forms a tender, red swelling with a central pustule. This may progress to carbuncles, an aggregate of furuncles which penetrates to deeper layers of skin and can lead to cellulitis, a diffuse inflammation of the skin. Furuncles may require systemic antibiotic treatment. For more information and photos, go to: Less severe form

2017 medSask

26. Sore throat (acute): antimicrobial prescribing

Recommendations 5 1.1 Managing acute sore throat 5 1.2 Self-care 7 1.3 Choice of antibiotic 8 Summary of the evidence 10 Self-care 10 Corticosteroids 12 No antibiotic 12 Back-up antibiotics 14 Identifying people more likely to benefit from antibiotics 14 Antibiotic choice 18 Antibiotic course length 20 Other considerations 22 Medicines adherence 22 Resource implications 22 T erms used in the guideline 23 FeverPAIN criteria 23 Centor criteria 23 Sore throat (acute): antimicrobial prescribing (NG84) © NICE 2019 (...) . All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 24Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for acute sore throat. It aims to limit antibiotic use and reduce antimicrobial resistance. Acute sore throat is often caused by a virus, lasts for about a week, and most people get better without antibiotics. Withholding antibiotics rarely leads to complications. See a 2-page visual summary

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

27. Urinary tract infection (lower): antimicrobial prescribing

of 35Contents Contents Overview 4 Who is it for? 4 Recommendations 5 1.1 Managing lower urinary tract infection 5 1.2 Managing asymptomatic bacteriuria 8 1.3 Self-care 9 1.4 Choice of antibiotic 9 Summary of the evidence 15 Self-care 15 Antibiotics 16 Choice of antibiotic 23 Antibiotic course length 29 Other considerations 34 Medicines adherence 34 Resource implications 34 Update information 35 Urinary tract infection (lower): antimicrobial prescribing (NG109) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject (...) to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 35This guideline should be read in conjunction with CG54, NG111 and NG112. Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for lower urinary tract infection (also called cystitis) in children, young people and adults who do not have a catheter. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 3-page visual summary of the recommendations, including

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

28. Prostatitis (acute): antimicrobial prescribing

is it for? 4 Recommendations 5 1.1 Managing acute prostatitis 5 1.2 Self-care 6 1.3 Choice of antibiotic 7 Summary of the evidence 9 Self-care 9 Antibiotics 9 Choice of antibiotic 11 Antibiotic course length 14 Antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing infective complications, including acute prostatitis, after biopsy 16 Other considerations 17 Medicines adherence 17 Resource implications 17 Prostatitis (acute): antimicrobial prescribing (NG110) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (...) (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 17Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for acute prostatitis. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 2-page visual summary of the recommendations, including a table to support prescribing decisions. NICE has also produced a guideline on antimicrobial stewardship: systems and processes for effective antimicrobial medicine use. Who is it for? Health

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

29. Pyelonephritis (acute): antimicrobial prescribing

is it for? 4 Recommendations 5 1.1 Managing acute pyelonephritis 5 1.2 Self-care 7 1.3 Choice of antibiotic 7 Summary of the evidence 13 Self-care 13 Antibiotics 13 Choice of antibiotic 14 Antibiotic course length 21 Antibiotic dose frequency 23 Antibiotic route of administration 23 Other considerations 25 Medicines adherence 25 Resource implications 25 Pyelonephritis (acute): antimicrobial prescribing (NG111) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms (...) -and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 26This guideline should be read in conjunction with NG109, NG112 and CG54. Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for acute pyelonephritis (upper urinary tract infection) in children, young people and adults who do not have a catheter. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 3-page visual summary of the recommendations, including a table to support prescribing decisions. NICE has also

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

30. Urinary tract infection (recurrent): antimicrobial prescribing

a catheter. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 2-page visual summary of the recommendations, including a table to support prescribing decisions. NICE has also produced a guideline on antimicrobial stewardship: systems and processes for effective antimicrobial medicine use. Who is it for? Health professionals People with recurrent urinary tract infection, their families and carers Urinary tract infection (recurrent): antimicrobial prescribing (NG112) © NICE 2019 (...) and over people with recurrent upper UTI people with recurrent lower UTI when the underlying cause is unknown pregnant women children and young people under 16 years in line with the NICE guideline on urinary tract infection in under 16s people with suspected cancer in line with the NICE guideline on suspected cancer: recognition and referral. See the evidence and committee discussion on antibiotic prophylaxis. Urinary tract infection (recurrent): antimicrobial prescribing (NG112) © NICE 2019. All

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

31. Otitis media (acute): antimicrobial prescribing

is it for? 4 Recommendations 5 1.1 Managing acute otitis media 5 1.2 Self-care 7 1.3 Choice of antibiotic 8 Summary of the evidence 10 Self-care 10 Oral corticosteroids 11 No antibiotic 12 Back-up antibiotics 14 Choice of antibiotic 16 Antibiotic course length 18 Antibiotic dose frequency 19 Other considerations 21 Medicines adherence 21 Resource implications 21 Otitis media (acute): antimicrobial prescribing (NG91) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk (...) /terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 21Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for acute otitis media (ear infection). It aims to limit antibiotic use and reduce antimicrobial resistance. Acute otitis media can be caused by viruses or bacteria. It lasts for about a week, and most children get better in 3 days without antibiotics. Serious complications are rare. See a 2-page visual summary of the recommendations, including tables to support

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

32. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (acute exacerbation): antimicrobial prescribing

implications 24 Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (acute exacerbation): antimicrobial prescribing (NG114) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 24This guideline should be read in conjunction with NG115. Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce (...) antibiotic resistance. See a 2-page visual summary of the recommendations, including tables to support prescribing decisions. See the NICE guideline on COPD in over 16s for other recommendations on preventing and managing an acute exacerbation of COPD, including self-management. Who is it for? Health professionals People with COPD, their families and carers Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (acute exacerbation): antimicrobial prescribing (NG114) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

33. Antimicrobial and Immunomodulatory Therapy in Adult Patients with COVID-19

Antimicrobial and Immunomodulatory Therapy in Adult Patients with COVID-19 British Columbia COVID19 Therapeutics Committee (CTC) Clinical Practice Guidance for Antimicrobial and Immunomodulatory Therapy in Adult Patients with COVID-19 SEVERITY OF ILLNESS ANTIVIRAL THERAPY ANTIBACTERIAL THERAPY IMMUNOMODULATORY THERAPY Critically Ill Patients Hospitalized, ICU-based Patients requiring ventilatory and/or circulatory support; also includes patients requiring high-flow nasal cannula, or higher (...) for DVT prophylaxis Chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine (with or without azithromycin) is not recommended outside of approved clinical trials or where other indications would justify its use Lopinavir/ritonavir is not recommended outside of approved clinical trials Remdesivir* is not recommended outside of approved clinical trials Antibacterial therapy is not routinely recommended outside of approved clinical trials or where other indications would justify its use (eg. suspected bacterial co-infection

2020 Covid-19 Ad hoc guidelines

34. Sinusitis (acute): antimicrobial prescribing

Background 5 Recommendations 6 1.1 Managing acute sinusitis 6 1.2 Choice of antibiotic 8 1.3 Self-care 10 Symptoms and signs 12 Common symptoms and signs 12 Factors that might make a bacterial cause more likely 12 Summary of the evidence 13 Self-care 13 Nasal corticosteroids 14 No antibiotic 15 Back-up antibiotics 17 Choice of antibiotic 18 Antibiotic course length 21 Other considerations 23 Medicines adherence 23 Resource implications 23 Sinusitis (acute): antimicrobial prescribing (NG79) © NICE 2019 (...) . All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 24Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for acute sinusitis. It aims to limit antibiotic use and reduce antimicrobial resistance. Acute sinusitis is usually caused by a virus, lasts for about 2 to 3 weeks, and most people get better without antibiotics. Withholding antibiotics rarely leads to complications. See a 2-page visual

2017 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

35. Antimicrobial stewardship: changing risk-related behaviours in the general population

Behavioural strategies and programmes 42 3 High-risk groups 42 4 Workplace 43 5 Older people in day and residential care 43 Antimicrobial stewardship: changing risk-related behaviours in the general population (NG63) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 4 of 44Ov Overview erview This guideline covers making people aware of how to correctly use antimicrobial medicines (including antibiotics) and the dangers (...) section on NHS Choices] or there is a high risk of travellers' diarrhoea). The following recommendations are for local authority public health teams. 1.2.4 Consider linking to awareness-raising initiatives for the public on reducing inappropriate antimicrobial demand and use and antimicrobial resistance (for example, European Antibiotic Awareness Day and Public Health England's Antibiotic Guardian). 1.2.5 Use opportunities that may arise through other local authority activities to distribute

2017 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

36. Neonatal infection: antibiotics for prevention and treatment

Neonatal infection: antibiotics for prevention and treatment Neonatal infection ( Neonatal infection (early onset): early onset): antibiotics for pre antibiotics for prev vention and treatment ention and treatment Clinical guideline Published: 22 August 2012 nice.org.uk/guidance/cg149 © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline (...) inequalities. Nothing in this guideline should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with complying with those duties. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Neonatal infection (early onset): antibiotics for prevention and treatment (CG149) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https

2012 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

37. Diarrhoea - antibiotic associated

-related behaviours in the general population . Review and, if appropriate, optimise current prescribing practice and use implementation techniques to ensure prescribing is in line with NICE antimicrobial prescribing guidelines or Public Health England (PHE) guidance on managing common infections in primary care, the Department of Health's guidance Start smart − then focus , local trust antimicrobial guidelines and the Antimicrobial Stewardship in Primary Care collaboration TARGET antibiotics toolkit (...) mechanisms [ ; ; ; ; ]: Disruption of the bowel microbiota and mucosal integrity. As a direct effect of the antibiotic (independent of its antimicrobial effect) — for example erythromycin can increase the rate of gastric emptying by acting as a motilin receptor agonist. Overgrowth of toxin-producing strains of Clostridium difficile (a Gram-positive, spore-forming, anaerobic bacillus) due to disruption of harmless bacteria in the gut. Overgrowth of C. difficile alone does not cause diarrhoea. C. difficile

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

38. Prophylactic antibiotics for children with recurrent urinary tract infections

Prophylactic antibiotics for children with recurrent urinary tract infections Prophylactic antibiotics for urinary tract infections are no longer routinely recommended. A large number of children must be given prophylaxis to prevent one infection and antibiotic resistance is a major concern when treating community-acquired urinary tract infections. The results of three recent significant studies are examined, with focus on the efficacy of prophylaxis, and recommendations are made. Key Words (...) : Antibiotic resistance; Antibiotic stewardship; Renal scarring; UTI; VUR

2015 Canadian Paediatric Society

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