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21. Adult and Pediatric Antibiotic Prophylaxis during Vascular and IR Procedures: A Society of Interventional Radiology Practice Parameter Update Endorsed by the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radological Society of Europe and the Canadian Association for

procedures, including the increasing prevalence of pediatric IR procedures, and the increasing repertoire of antibacterial agents. As was the case for the original guidelines (1), the availability of randomized controlled data regarding antibiotic prophylaxis is lacking in the IR literature. Much data are derived from retrospective reviews From the Department of Diagnostic Radiology (M.A.C.), Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan; Department of Radiology (A.S.T (...) to oropharyngeal ?ora, which can potentially seed the skin entry site. This procedure carries a peristomal infection rate of approximately 30% (156). Prophylactic antibiotic therapy is therefore recommended for all patients undergoing this procedure with antimicrobial agents targeting skin and oropharyngeal bacteria, eg, cefazolin followed by oral/enteric cephalexin (156). (New data reviewed, recommendations updated.) Liver Tumor Ablation In 2015, Bhatia et al (157) described a very low incidence of hepatic ab

2019 Society of Interventional Radiology

22. Impetigo: antimicrobial prescribing

T erms used in the guideline 11 Recommendation for research 13 1 Antiseptics compared with antibiotics for impetigo 13 Rationales 14 Advice to reduce the spread of impetigo 14 Initial treatment 14 Reassessment and further treatment 16 Referral and seeking specialist advice 17 Choice of antimicrobial 18 Context 21 Summary of the evidence 22 Antimicrobials 22 Choice of antibiotics 23 Course length 25 Route of administration 25 Other considerations 27 Medicines safety 27 Medicines adherence 27 (...) Resource implications 27 Impetigo: antimicrobial prescribing (NG153) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 28Overview Overview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for adults, young people and children aged 72 hours and over with impetigo. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. For managing other skin and soft tissue infections, see our web pages

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

23. Human and animal bites: antimicrobial prescribing

and committee details 27 Human and animal bites: antimicrobial prescribing (NG184) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 27Overview Overview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for human and animal bites (excluding insect bites) in adults, young people and children aged 72 hours and over. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 3-page visual summary (...) ), that you are unfamiliar with. For a short explanation of why the committee made these recommendations, see the rationale section on assessment. For more details, see the evidence review. Human and animal bites: antimicrobial prescribing (NG184) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 5 of 27Antibiotic prophylaxis for uninfected bites Antibiotic prophylaxis for uninfected bites Human bites Human bites 1.1.4 Do

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

24. Insect bites and stings: antimicrobial prescribing

bites and stings 5 T erms used in the guideline 7 Rationales 9 Assessment and advice 9 Treatment 9 Referral and seeking specialist advice 10 Context 12 Summary of the evidence 13 Antibiotics for infected arthropod bites in adults 13 Oral antihistamines for uninfected mosquito bites in adults 14 Antihistamines for uninfected mosquito bites in children 15 Treatments for uninfected brown recluse spider bites 15 Insect bites and stings: antimicrobial prescribing (NG182) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved (...) . Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 16Overview Overview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for insect and spider bites and stings in adults, young people and children aged 72 hours and over, including those that occurred while travelling outside the UK. It aims to limit antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 1-page visual summary of the recommendations. The recommendations in this guideline

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

25. Leg ulcer infection: antimicrobial prescribing

26 Medicines safety 26 Medicines adherence 27 Resource implications 27 Leg ulcer infection: antimicrobial prescribing (NG152) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 28Overview Overview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for adults with leg ulcer infection. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 2-page visual summary (...) antibiotic use. 1.1.4 Give oral antibiotics if the person can take oral medicines, and the severity of their condition does not require intravenous antibiotics. 1.1.5 If intravenous antibiotics are given, review by 48 hours and consider switching to oral antibiotics if possible. T o find out why the committee made the recommendations on treatment for adults with an infected leg ulcer, see the rationales. Leg ulcer infection: antimicrobial prescribing (NG152) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

26. Antimicrobial stewardship: Systems and processes for effective antimicrobial medicine use within human health and healthcare in New Zealand

and Contextualisation Group (GRCG) for each guideline. The GRCG will carefully consider the NICE guideline recommendations, taking into account the differences between the UK and New Zealand health care systems to produce a guideline that is relevant to those delivering and managing care in New Zealand. The development of a profusion of antimicrobial medicines since the middle of the twentieth century has been one of the greatest advances of medical science. Antibiotic therapy has reduced the mortality (...) ‘antimicrobial resistance’ is defined as the ‘loss of effectiveness of any anti infective medicine, including antiviral, antifungal, antibacterial and antiparasitic medicines’. Antimicrobials and antimicrobial medicines The term ‘antimicrobials’ and ‘antimicrobial medicines’ includes all anti infective therapies, (antiviral, antifungal, antibacterial and antiparasitic medicines) and all formulations (oral, parenteral and topical agents). Organisations The term ‘organisations’ (also known as the ‘service

2017 Best Practice Advocacy Centre New Zealand

27. Antibiotic Therapy in Preterm Premature Rupture of the Membranes

Antibiotic Therapy in Preterm Premature Rupture of the Membranes No. 233-Antibiotic Therapy in Preterm Premature Rupture of the Membranes - Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Volume 39, Issue 9, Pages e207–e212 No. 233-Antibiotic Therapy in Preterm Premature Rupture of the Membranes x Mark H. Yudin , MD Toronto, ON x Julie van Schalkwyk , MD Vancouver, BC x Nancy Van Eyk , MD Halifax, NS No. 233, September 2017 (...) DOI: To view the full text, please login as a subscribed user or . Click to view the full text on ScienceDirect. Abstract Objective To review the evidence and provide recommendations on the use of antibiotics in preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM). Outcomes Outcomes evaluated include the effect of antibiotic treatment on maternal infection, chorioamnionitis, and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Evidence Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL

2017 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

28. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Obstetric Procedures

Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Obstetric Procedures No. 247-Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Obstetric Procedures - Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Volume 39, Issue 9, Pages e293–e299 No. 247-Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Obstetric Procedures x Julie van Schalkwyk , MD Vancouver, BC x Nancy Van Eyk , MD Halifax, NS No. 247, September 2017 DOI: To view the full text, please login as a subscribed user or . Click to view the full (...) text on ScienceDirect. Abstract Objective To review the evidence and provide recommendations on antibiotic prophylaxis for obstetrical procedures. Outcomes Outcomes evaluated include need and effectiveness of antibiotics to prevent infections in obstetrical procedures. Evidence Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline and The Cochrane Library on the topic of antibiotic prophylaxis in obstetrical procedures. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled

2017 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

29. Antimicrobial stewardship: systems and processes for effective antimicrobial medicine use

(including antibiotics) in children, young people and adults. It aims to change prescribing practice to help slow the emergence of antimicrobial resistance and ensure that antimicrobials remain an effective treatment for infection. Who is it for? Health and social care practitioners Organisations commissioning, providing or supporting the provision of care People who are taking antimicrobials and their families and carers. Antimicrobial stewardship: systems and processes for effective antimicrobial (...) Antimicrobial stewardship Antimicrobial stewardship The term 'antimicrobial stewardship' is defined as 'an organisational or healthcare-system-wide approach to promoting and monitoring judicious use of antimicrobials to preserve their future effectiveness' . Antimicrobial resistance Antimicrobial resistance The term 'antimicrobial resistance' is defined as the 'loss of effectiveness of any anti-infective medicine, including antiviral, antifungal, antibacterial and antiparasitic medicines' . Antimicrobials

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

30. Bronchiectasis (non-cystic fibrosis), acute exacerbation: antimicrobial prescribing

Reassessment 14 Referral and seeking specialist advice 14 Choice of antibiotic for treating an acute exacerbation of bronchiectasis 15 Preventing acute exacerbations of bronchiectasis (non-cystic fibrosis) and choice of antibiotic 17 Bronchiectasis (non-cystic fibrosis), acute exacerbation: antimicrobial prescribing (NG117) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 19Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out (...) an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for managing and preventing acute exacerbations of bronchiectasis (non-cystic fibrosis). It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 3-page visual summary of the recommendations, including tables to support prescribing decisions. NICE has also produced a guideline on antimicrobial stewardship: systems and processes for effective antimicrobial medicine use. Who is it for? Health professionals People with bronchiectasis, their families

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

31. Cough (acute): antimicrobial prescribing

1.1 Managing acute cough 5 1.2 Self-care 8 1.3 Choice of antibiotic 9 T erms used in the guideline 11 Acute cough 11 Acute bronchitis 11 Self-care treatments 11 Summary of the evidence 12 Self-care 12 Bronchodilators 22 Corticosteroids 23 Mucolytics 24 No antibiotic 25 Back-up antibiotics 29 Choice of antibiotic 33 Antibiotic course length 35 Other considerations 36 Medicines adherence 36 Resource implications 36 Cough (acute): antimicrobial prescribing (NG120) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved (...) . Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 36Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for acute cough associated with an upper respiratory tract infection or acute bronchitis in adults, young people and children. It aims to limit antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 2-page visual summary of the recommendations, including tables to support prescribing decisions. For treating coughs

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

32. Pneumonia (hospital-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing

of 23Contents Contents Overview 4 Who is it for? 4 Recommendations 5 1.1 Managing hospital-acquired pneumonia 5 1.2 Choice of antibiotic 6 T erms used in the guideline 13 Hospital-acquired pneumonia 13 Summary of the evidence 14 Antibiotic prescribing strategies 14 Choice of antibiotics 15 Antibiotic course length, dosage and route of administration 22 Other considerations 23 Medicines adherence 23 Resource implications 23 Pneumonia (hospital-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing (NG139) © NICE 2019. All (...) rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 23Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for adults, young people, children and babies aged 72 hours and over with a confirmed diagnosis of hospital-acquired pneumonia. It does not cover ventilator-associated pneumonia. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 3-page visual summary of the recommendations

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

33. Cellulitis and erysipelas: antimicrobial prescribing

. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 3-page visual summary of the recommendations, including tables to support prescribing decisions. For managing other skin conditions, see our web page on skin conditions. NICE has also produced a guideline on antimicrobial stewardship: systems and processes for effective antimicrobial medicine use. Who is it for? Healthcare professionals People with cellulitis and erysipelas, their families and carers Cellulitis and erysipelas (...) Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) status if known. 1.1.5 Give oral antibiotics first line if the person can take oral medicines, and the severity of their condition does not require intravenous antibiotics. Cellulitis and erysipelas: antimicrobial prescribing (NG141) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 5 of 361.1.6 If intravenous antibiotics are given, review by 48 hours and consider switching to oral antibiotics

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

34. Pneumonia (community-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing

37 Resource implications 37 Pneumonia (community-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing (NG138) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 37Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for adults, young people, children and babies aged 72 hours and over with a confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic (...) disease or immunosuppression local antimicrobial resistance and surveillance data (such as flu and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection rates) recent antibiotic use recent microbiological results, including colonisation with multidrug-resistant bacteria. 1.1.2 Start antibiotic treatment as soon as possible after establishing a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia, and certainly within 4 hours (within 1 hour if the person has suspected sepsis and meets any of the high risk criteria for this – see

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

35. Preoperative Antibiotics and Surgical Site Infection in Breast Surgery

Preoperative Antibiotics and Surgical Site Infection in Breast Surgery - Official Statement - Consensus Guideline on Preoperative Antibiotics and Surgical Site Infection in Breast Surgery Purpose To outline recommendations for reducing and treating surgical site infections (SSIs). Associated ASBrS Guidelines or Quality Measures 1. This document replaces the previous ASBrS Statement of Position Statement on Antibiotics and Surgical Site Infection. 2. Quality Measure: Surgical Site Infection (...) and Cellulitis After Breast and/or Axillary Surgery Methods Literature review inclusive of recent randomized controlled trials evaluating the indications for and use of antibiotics to reduce and treat SSIs for patients undergoing breast surgery for both benign and malignant disease. This is not a complete systematic review but a comprehensive review of the modern literature on this subject. The ASBrS Research Committee developed a consensus document, which was reviewed and approved by the ASBrS Board

2017 Publication 4891083

38. Superficial Bacterial Skin Infections - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Antibiotics for impetigo and folliculitis

Superficial Bacterial Skin Infections - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Antibiotics for impetigo and folliculitis Superficial Bacterial Skin Infections - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Antibiotics for impetigo and folliculitis - medSask Home - College of Pharmacy and Nutrition - University of Saskatchewan Toggle Menu Search the U of S Search Superficial Bacterial Skin Infections - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Antibiotics for impetigo and folliculitis The skin has an effective (...) itchy, papules and/or pustules at the base of the hair shaft. The causative agent is usually aureus . Furuncles or boils usually begin as folliculitis which spreads and forms a tender, red swelling with a central pustule. This may progress to carbuncles, an aggregate of furuncles which penetrates to deeper layers of skin and can lead to cellulitis, a diffuse inflammation of the skin. Furuncles may require systemic antibiotic treatment. For more information and photos, go to: Less severe form

2017 medSask

39. Otitis media (acute): antimicrobial prescribing

is it for? 4 Recommendations 5 1.1 Managing acute otitis media 5 1.2 Self-care 7 1.3 Choice of antibiotic 8 Summary of the evidence 10 Self-care 10 Oral corticosteroids 11 No antibiotic 12 Back-up antibiotics 14 Choice of antibiotic 16 Antibiotic course length 18 Antibiotic dose frequency 19 Other considerations 21 Medicines adherence 21 Resource implications 21 Otitis media (acute): antimicrobial prescribing (NG91) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk (...) /terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 21Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for acute otitis media (ear infection). It aims to limit antibiotic use and reduce antimicrobial resistance. Acute otitis media can be caused by viruses or bacteria. It lasts for about a week, and most children get better in 3 days without antibiotics. Serious complications are rare. See a 2-page visual summary of the recommendations, including tables to support

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

40. Sore throat (acute): antimicrobial prescribing

Recommendations 5 1.1 Managing acute sore throat 5 1.2 Self-care 7 1.3 Choice of antibiotic 8 Summary of the evidence 10 Self-care 10 Corticosteroids 12 No antibiotic 12 Back-up antibiotics 14 Identifying people more likely to benefit from antibiotics 14 Antibiotic choice 18 Antibiotic course length 20 Other considerations 22 Medicines adherence 22 Resource implications 22 T erms used in the guideline 23 FeverPAIN criteria 23 Centor criteria 23 Sore throat (acute): antimicrobial prescribing (NG84) © NICE 2019 (...) . All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 24Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for acute sore throat. It aims to limit antibiotic use and reduce antimicrobial resistance. Acute sore throat is often caused by a virus, lasts for about a week, and most people get better without antibiotics. Withholding antibiotics rarely leads to complications. See a 2-page visual summary

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

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