How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

1,859 results for

antibiotics

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. COVID-19 rapid guideline: antibiotics for pneumonia in adults in hospital

that bacterial co-infection occurs in less than about 10% of patients with COVID-19. But patients in critical care have an increased likelihood of bacterial infection compared with patients in other hospital wards or settings. • Because COVID-19 pneumonia is caused by a virus, antibiotics are ineffective unless there is a bacterial co-infection. • Inappropriate antibiotic use may reduce their availability, and indiscriminate use may lead to Clostridioides difficile infection and antimicrobial resistance (...) or more after admission and that was not incubating at admission). 3.5 When choosing antibiotics, take account of: • local antimicrobial resistance data and • other factors such as their availability. 3.6 For patients who are already taking an antibiotic that was started in the community for suspected pneumonia: • review the antibiotic choice and • change the antibiotic in line with antibiotic prescribing table 1, if appropriate. 3.7 Give oral antibiotics if the patient can take oral medicines

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

2. Antibiotics after incision and drainage for uncomplicated skin abscesses Full Text available with Trip Pro

of adverse effects including nausea and diarrhoea We suggest TMP-SMX rather than clindamycin because TMP-SMX has a lower risk of diarrhoea Cephalosporins in addition to incision and drainage are probably not more effective than incision and drainage alone in most settings From a societal perspective, the modest benefits from adjuvant antibiotics may not outweigh the harms from increased antimicrobial resistance in the community, although this is speculative Box 1 Linked articles in this BMJ Rapid (...) are likely to prefer TMP-SMX. Person-centred versus societal perspective (impact on antibiotic resistance) The recommendations explicitly take a person-centred perspective rather than a public health or societal perspective. The use of antibiotics is associated with the emergence of antibiotic resistance within the community and may increase the risk of antibiotic resistant infections in community members. The increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance are a public health priority. From a societal

2018 BMJ Rapid Recommendations

3. Respiratory tract infections (self-limiting) – reducing antibiotic prescribing

in the event of a significant clinical deterioration. Sore throat/pharyngitis/tonsillitis has been excluded from the contextualised guideline for two reasons: (i) in contrast to the UK, New Zealand has a relatively high incidence of rheumatic fever and therefore the risks of not prescribing an antibiotic treatment for many patients with sore throat are very much greater; and (ii) in New Zealand there are widely used guidelines that recommend antimicrobial treatment for patients with sore throat who (...) Otitis Media. Diagnosis and Management of Acute Otitis Media. Pediatrics, 2004 113(5), 1451-65. 2. McGregor A, Dovey S, Tilyard M. Antibiotic use in upper respiratory tract infections in New Zealand. Family Practice 1995;12:166-70. 3. Thomas MG, Smith AJ, Tilyard M. Rising antimicrobial resistance: a strong reason to reduce antimicrobial consumption in New Zealand. NZ Med J 2014;127:1394:72-84. 4. Heart Foundation of New Zealand: Guidelines for Group A Streptococcal Sore Throat Management Guideline

2019 Best Practice Advocacy Centre New Zealand

4. Antibiotic Use for the Urgent Management of Dental Pain and Intra-oral Swelling Clinical Practice Guideline Full Text available with Trip Pro

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Telebriefing on today's drug-resistant health threats. ( Available at: ) . , x 16 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Joint Statement on Importance of Outpatient Antibiotics Stewardship From 12 National Health Organizations. ( Available at: ) . , x 17 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Antibiotic/antimicrobial resistance (AR/AMR): the AMR challenge. ( Available at: ) . , x 18 White House Office of the Press Secretary. Fact sheet: over 150 (...) Antibiotic Use for the Urgent Management of Dental Pain and Intra-oral Swelling Clinical Practice Guideline Evidence-based clinical practice guideline on antibiotic use for the urgent management of pulpal- and periapical-related dental pain and intraoral swelling - The Journal of the American Dental Association Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Access provided by Volume 150, Issue 11, Pages 906–921.e12 Evidence-based clinical practice guideline

2020 American Dental Association Guidelines

5. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Gynaecologic Procedures

Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Gynaecologic Procedures No. 275-Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Gynaecologic Procedures - Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Volume 40, Issue 10, Pages e723–e733 No. 275-Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Gynaecologic Procedures x Nancy Van Eyk , MD Halifax, NS x Julie van Schalkwyk , MD Vancouver, BC No. 275, April 2012 (Reaffirmed October 2018) DOI: To view the full text, please login as a subscribed (...) user or . Click to view the full text on ScienceDirect. Abstract Objective To review the evidence and provide recommendations on antibiotic prophylaxis for gynaecologic procedures. Outcomes Outcomes evaluated include need and effectiveness of antibiotics to prevent infections in gynaecologic procedures. Evidence Medline and The Cochrane Library were searched for articles published between January 1978 and January 2011 on the topic of antibiotic prophylaxis in gynaecologic procedures. Results were

2018 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

6. Is the use of chlorhexidine contributing to increased resistance to chlorhexidine and/or antibiotics?

’ defined by using the clinical breakpoints for resistance as specified by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility testing (EUCAST) or the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CSLI). 2. Increase in the incidence (rate) of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria established through the use of chlorhexidine identifying dosage form, exposure and specific population and / or setting. Antibiotic-resistant strain of bacteria through the use of chlorhexidine to be recorded. 3. Increases (...) to chlorhexidine in a specific population and / or setting. To address the question ‘Does exposure (different dosages, duration of use, and stratification of exposure) to any form of chlorhexidine increases the incidence and/or prevalence of antibiotic- resistant strains of bacteria in any person within different healthcare settings? ’ the outcomes included: ? ‘Resistance against antibiotics’ defined by using the clinical breakpoints for resistance as specified by the European Committee on Antimicrobial

2018 National Health and Medical Research Council

7. FSRH CEU statement on antibiotic cover for urgent insertion of intrauterine contraception in women at high risk of STI

FSRH CEU statement on antibiotic cover for urgent insertion of intrauterine contraception in women at high risk of STI FSRH CEU statement on antibiotic cover for urgent insertion of intrauterine contraception in women at high risk of STI (May 2019) - Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare FSRH CEU statement on antibiotic cover for urgent insertion of intrauterine contraception in women at high risk of STI (May 2019) FSRH CEU statement on antibiotic cover for urgent insertion (...) of intrauterine contraception in women at high risk of STI (May 2019) Share this article Published on: 22 May 2019 File size: 241kb PDF File type: Clinical Statements This statement provides guidance on antibiotic cover for urgent insertion of intrauterine contraception in women at high risk of STI. Download the full document here. Your download should start automatically. If not . Document types Thinking about taking a qualification? Registration is now quick and easy online. About FSRH FSRH is a faculty

2019 Faculty of Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare

8. Adult and Pediatric Antibiotic Prophylaxis during Vascular and IR Procedures: A Society of Interventional Radiology Practice Parameter Update Endorsed by the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radological Society of Europe and the Canadian Association for

procedures, including the increasing prevalence of pediatric IR procedures, and the increasing repertoire of antibacterial agents. As was the case for the original guidelines (1), the availability of randomized controlled data regarding antibiotic prophylaxis is lacking in the IR literature. Much data are derived from retrospective reviews From the Department of Diagnostic Radiology (M.A.C.), Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan; Department of Radiology (A.S.T (...) to oropharyngeal ?ora, which can potentially seed the skin entry site. This procedure carries a peristomal infection rate of approximately 30% (156). Prophylactic antibiotic therapy is therefore recommended for all patients undergoing this procedure with antimicrobial agents targeting skin and oropharyngeal bacteria, eg, cefazolin followed by oral/enteric cephalexin (156). (New data reviewed, recommendations updated.) Liver Tumor Ablation In 2015, Bhatia et al (157) described a very low incidence of hepatic ab

2019 Society of Interventional Radiology

11. Impetigo: antimicrobial prescribing

T erms used in the guideline 11 Recommendation for research 13 1 Antiseptics compared with antibiotics for impetigo 13 Rationales 14 Advice to reduce the spread of impetigo 14 Initial treatment 14 Reassessment and further treatment 16 Referral and seeking specialist advice 17 Choice of antimicrobial 18 Context 21 Summary of the evidence 22 Antimicrobials 22 Choice of antibiotics 23 Course length 25 Route of administration 25 Other considerations 27 Medicines safety 27 Medicines adherence 27 (...) Resource implications 27 Impetigo: antimicrobial prescribing (NG153) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 28Overview Overview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for adults, young people and children aged 72 hours and over with impetigo. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. For managing other skin and soft tissue infections, see our web pages

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

12. Leg ulcer infection: antimicrobial prescribing

26 Medicines safety 26 Medicines adherence 27 Resource implications 27 Leg ulcer infection: antimicrobial prescribing (NG152) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 28Overview Overview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for adults with leg ulcer infection. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 2-page visual summary (...) antibiotic use. 1.1.4 Give oral antibiotics if the person can take oral medicines, and the severity of their condition does not require intravenous antibiotics. 1.1.5 If intravenous antibiotics are given, review by 48 hours and consider switching to oral antibiotics if possible. T o find out why the committee made the recommendations on treatment for adults with an infected leg ulcer, see the rationales. Leg ulcer infection: antimicrobial prescribing (NG152) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

13. Antimicrobial stewardship: Systems and processes for effective antimicrobial medicine use within human health and healthcare in New Zealand

and Contextualisation Group (GRCG) for each guideline. The GRCG will carefully consider the NICE guideline recommendations, taking into account the differences between the UK and New Zealand health care systems to produce a guideline that is relevant to those delivering and managing care in New Zealand. The development of a profusion of antimicrobial medicines since the middle of the twentieth century has been one of the greatest advances of medical science. Antibiotic therapy has reduced the mortality (...) ‘antimicrobial resistance’ is defined as the ‘loss of effectiveness of any anti infective medicine, including antiviral, antifungal, antibacterial and antiparasitic medicines’. Antimicrobials and antimicrobial medicines The term ‘antimicrobials’ and ‘antimicrobial medicines’ includes all anti infective therapies, (antiviral, antifungal, antibacterial and antiparasitic medicines) and all formulations (oral, parenteral and topical agents). Organisations The term ‘organisations’ (also known as the ‘service

2017 Best Practice Advocacy Centre New Zealand

14. Antibiotic Therapy in Preterm Premature Rupture of the Membranes

Antibiotic Therapy in Preterm Premature Rupture of the Membranes No. 233-Antibiotic Therapy in Preterm Premature Rupture of the Membranes - Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Volume 39, Issue 9, Pages e207–e212 No. 233-Antibiotic Therapy in Preterm Premature Rupture of the Membranes x Mark H. Yudin , MD Toronto, ON x Julie van Schalkwyk , MD Vancouver, BC x Nancy Van Eyk , MD Halifax, NS No. 233, September 2017 (...) DOI: To view the full text, please login as a subscribed user or . Click to view the full text on ScienceDirect. Abstract Objective To review the evidence and provide recommendations on the use of antibiotics in preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM). Outcomes Outcomes evaluated include the effect of antibiotic treatment on maternal infection, chorioamnionitis, and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Evidence Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL

2017 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

15. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Obstetric Procedures

Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Obstetric Procedures No. 247-Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Obstetric Procedures - Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Volume 39, Issue 9, Pages e293–e299 No. 247-Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Obstetric Procedures x Julie van Schalkwyk , MD Vancouver, BC x Nancy Van Eyk , MD Halifax, NS No. 247, September 2017 DOI: To view the full text, please login as a subscribed user or . Click to view the full (...) text on ScienceDirect. Abstract Objective To review the evidence and provide recommendations on antibiotic prophylaxis for obstetrical procedures. Outcomes Outcomes evaluated include need and effectiveness of antibiotics to prevent infections in obstetrical procedures. Evidence Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline and The Cochrane Library on the topic of antibiotic prophylaxis in obstetrical procedures. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled

2017 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

16. Antimicrobial stewardship: systems and processes for effective antimicrobial medicine use

(including antibiotics) in children, young people and adults. It aims to change prescribing practice to help slow the emergence of antimicrobial resistance and ensure that antimicrobials remain an effective treatment for infection. Who is it for? Health and social care practitioners Organisations commissioning, providing or supporting the provision of care People who are taking antimicrobials and their families and carers. Antimicrobial stewardship: systems and processes for effective antimicrobial (...) Antimicrobial stewardship Antimicrobial stewardship The term 'antimicrobial stewardship' is defined as 'an organisational or healthcare-system-wide approach to promoting and monitoring judicious use of antimicrobials to preserve their future effectiveness' . Antimicrobial resistance Antimicrobial resistance The term 'antimicrobial resistance' is defined as the 'loss of effectiveness of any anti-infective medicine, including antiviral, antifungal, antibacterial and antiparasitic medicines' . Antimicrobials

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

17. Pneumonia (hospital-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing

of 23Contents Contents Overview 4 Who is it for? 4 Recommendations 5 1.1 Managing hospital-acquired pneumonia 5 1.2 Choice of antibiotic 6 T erms used in the guideline 13 Hospital-acquired pneumonia 13 Summary of the evidence 14 Antibiotic prescribing strategies 14 Choice of antibiotics 15 Antibiotic course length, dosage and route of administration 22 Other considerations 23 Medicines adherence 23 Resource implications 23 Pneumonia (hospital-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing (NG139) © NICE 2019. All (...) rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 23Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for adults, young people, children and babies aged 72 hours and over with a confirmed diagnosis of hospital-acquired pneumonia. It does not cover ventilator-associated pneumonia. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 3-page visual summary of the recommendations

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

18. Pneumonia (community-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing

37 Resource implications 37 Pneumonia (community-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing (NG138) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 37Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for adults, young people, children and babies aged 72 hours and over with a confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic (...) disease or immunosuppression local antimicrobial resistance and surveillance data (such as flu and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection rates) recent antibiotic use recent microbiological results, including colonisation with multidrug-resistant bacteria. 1.1.2 Start antibiotic treatment as soon as possible after establishing a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia, and certainly within 4 hours (within 1 hour if the person has suspected sepsis and meets any of the high risk criteria for this – see

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

19. Cellulitis and erysipelas: antimicrobial prescribing

. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 3-page visual summary of the recommendations, including tables to support prescribing decisions. For managing other skin conditions, see our web page on skin conditions. NICE has also produced a guideline on antimicrobial stewardship: systems and processes for effective antimicrobial medicine use. Who is it for? Healthcare professionals People with cellulitis and erysipelas, their families and carers Cellulitis and erysipelas (...) Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) status if known. 1.1.5 Give oral antibiotics first line if the person can take oral medicines, and the severity of their condition does not require intravenous antibiotics. Cellulitis and erysipelas: antimicrobial prescribing (NG141) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 5 of 361.1.6 If intravenous antibiotics are given, review by 48 hours and consider switching to oral antibiotics

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

20. Cough (acute): antimicrobial prescribing

1.1 Managing acute cough 5 1.2 Self-care 8 1.3 Choice of antibiotic 9 T erms used in the guideline 11 Acute cough 11 Acute bronchitis 11 Self-care treatments 11 Summary of the evidence 12 Self-care 12 Bronchodilators 22 Corticosteroids 23 Mucolytics 24 No antibiotic 25 Back-up antibiotics 29 Choice of antibiotic 33 Antibiotic course length 35 Other considerations 36 Medicines adherence 36 Resource implications 36 Cough (acute): antimicrobial prescribing (NG120) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved (...) . Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 36Ov Overview erview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for acute cough associated with an upper respiratory tract infection or acute bronchitis in adults, young people and children. It aims to limit antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. See a 2-page visual summary of the recommendations, including tables to support prescribing decisions. For treating coughs

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

Guidelines

Guidelines – filter by country