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1. Neonatal infection: antibiotics for prevention and treatment

Neonatal infection: antibiotics for prevention and treatment Neonatal infection: antibiotics for prevention and treatment NICE guideline Published: 20 April 2021 www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng195 © NICE 2021. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Your responsibility Your responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When (...) with complying with those duties. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Neonatal infection: antibiotics for prevention and treatment (NG195) © NICE 2021. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 55Contents Contents Overview 5 Who is it for? 5

2021 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

2. COVID-19 rapid guideline: antibiotics for pneumonia in adults in hospital

that bacterial co-infection occurs in less than about 10% of patients with COVID-19. But patients in critical care have an increased likelihood of bacterial infection compared with patients in other hospital wards or settings. • Because COVID-19 pneumonia is caused by a virus, antibiotics are ineffective unless there is a bacterial co-infection. • Inappropriate antibiotic use may reduce their availability, and indiscriminate use may lead to Clostridioides difficile infection and antimicrobial resistance (...) or more after admission and that was not incubating at admission). 3.5 When choosing antibiotics, take account of: • local antimicrobial resistance data and • other factors such as their availability. 3.6 For patients who are already taking an antibiotic that was started in the community for suspected pneumonia: • review the antibiotic choice and • change the antibiotic in line with antibiotic prescribing table 1, if appropriate. 3.7 Give oral antibiotics if the patient can take oral medicines

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

3. Diarrhoea - antibiotic associated: Scenario: Diarrhoea - antibiotic associated

in a NICE evidence summary on the risk of C. difficile with broad-spectrum antibiotics [ ], Public Health England diagnostic guidance [ ], and North American practice parameters [ ]. The most frequently implicated antibiotics include broad-spectrum penicillins, cephalosporins, clindamycin, and flouroquinolones, but most antibiotics have been associated with C. difficile infection [ ; ; ; ]. The risk of C. difficile infection is increased with greater number of antimicrobials used, higher doses (...) leading to toxic megacolon and intestinal perforation and necrosis [ ; ; ]. Antibiotics for treating mild to moderate Clostridium difficile infection The recommendations regarding the choice of antibiotic to treat C. difficile infection is based on guidance published by Public Health England: Updated guidance on the management and treatment of Clostridium difficile infection [ ], Managing suspected infectious diarrhoea [ ] and Summary of antimicrobial prescribing guidance - managing common infections

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

4. FSRH CEU Response to study: Analysis of reports of unintended pregnancies associated with the combined use of non-enzyme inducing antibiotics and hormonal contraceptives

FSRH CEU Response to study: Analysis of reports of unintended pregnancies associated with the combined use of non-enzyme inducing antibiotics and hormonal contraceptives 1 FSRH CEU Statement: Response to Recent Publication Aronson and Ferner, 2020 “Analysis of reports of unintended pregnancies associated with the combined use of non-enzymeinducing antibiotics and hormonal contraceptives ” 2 February 2021 Why is this statement necessary? Since oral contraception first became available (...) , there have been concerns that antibiotics might interfere with their efficacy. There is limited published evidence to inform this issue; however, most data for non-enzyme inducing antibiotics have been reassuring. The journal BMJ Evidence Based Medicine recently published a study 1 —which has received some media attention—suggesting that concomitant use of non-enzyme inducing antibiotics could reduce the effectiveness of “hormonal contraceptives”. Aronson and Ferner 1 reviewed Yellow Card reports

2021 Faculty of Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare

5. Appropriate Use of Short-Course Antibiotics in Common Infections: Best Practice Advice From the American College of Physicians

Congrats! Your Phone has been verified Enter words / phrases / DOI / ISBN / keywords / authors / etc Search , , , , , , Abstract Description: Antimicrobial overuse is a major health care issue that contributes to antibiotic resistance. Such overuse includes unnecessarily long durations of antibiotic therapy in patients with common bacterial infections, such as acute bronchitis with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), urinary tract infections (...) , outpatients received more than 250 million courses of antibiotics in the United States, and at least 30% were considered unnecessary and often continued for too long, particularly for bronchitis and sinusitis ( ). Antimicrobial overuse, particularly with broad-spectrum antibiotics, drives resistance and causes adverse events in up to 20% of patients, ranging from allergic reactions to Clostridioides difficile infections ( , ). The American College of Physicians (ACP) and the Centers for Disease Control

2021 American College of Physicians

6. Use of delayed prescriptions of antibiotics for infants and children - statement

Use of delayed prescriptions of antibiotics for infants and children - statement Use of delayed prescriptions of antibiotics for infants and children - statement | RCPCH Quick links Quick links Search RCPCH Search X Search RCPCH Search Submenu membership Members' blogs College members give their views and personal perspectives from across the world of paediatrics. A final message as President Professor Russell Viner reflects on his three extraordinary years as RCPCH President, and welcomes his (...) it means for the wellbeing of all of us. X Use of delayed prescriptions of antibiotics for infants and children - statement The aim of this evidence-based statement is to summarise the current knowledge about delayed prescriptions (also called backup prescriptions) for antibiotics and to highlight the special issues that must be taken into account when considering the need for a delayed prescription in infants and children. Last modified 12 September 2019 Post date 11 January 2019 Table of contents

2020 Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health

7. Antibiotics after incision and drainage for uncomplicated skin abscesses Full Text available with Trip Pro

of adverse effects including nausea and diarrhoea We suggest TMP-SMX rather than clindamycin because TMP-SMX has a lower risk of diarrhoea Cephalosporins in addition to incision and drainage are probably not more effective than incision and drainage alone in most settings From a societal perspective, the modest benefits from adjuvant antibiotics may not outweigh the harms from increased antimicrobial resistance in the community, although this is speculative Box 1 Linked articles in this BMJ Rapid (...) are likely to prefer TMP-SMX. Person-centred versus societal perspective (impact on antibiotic resistance) The recommendations explicitly take a person-centred perspective rather than a public health or societal perspective. The use of antibiotics is associated with the emergence of antibiotic resistance within the community and may increase the risk of antibiotic resistant infections in community members. The increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance are a public health priority. From a societal

2018 BMJ Rapid Recommendations

8. Respiratory tract infections (self-limiting) – reducing antibiotic prescribing

in the event of a significant clinical deterioration. Sore throat/pharyngitis/tonsillitis has been excluded from the contextualised guideline for two reasons: (i) in contrast to the UK, New Zealand has a relatively high incidence of rheumatic fever and therefore the risks of not prescribing an antibiotic treatment for many patients with sore throat are very much greater; and (ii) in New Zealand there are widely used guidelines that recommend antimicrobial treatment for patients with sore throat who (...) Otitis Media. Diagnosis and Management of Acute Otitis Media. Pediatrics, 2004 113(5), 1451-65. 2. McGregor A, Dovey S, Tilyard M. Antibiotic use in upper respiratory tract infections in New Zealand. Family Practice 1995;12:166-70. 3. Thomas MG, Smith AJ, Tilyard M. Rising antimicrobial resistance: a strong reason to reduce antimicrobial consumption in New Zealand. NZ Med J 2014;127:1394:72-84. 4. Heart Foundation of New Zealand: Guidelines for Group A Streptococcal Sore Throat Management Guideline

2019 Best Practice Advocacy Centre New Zealand

9. Antibiotic Use for the Urgent Management of Dental Pain and Intra-oral Swelling Clinical Practice Guideline Full Text available with Trip Pro

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Telebriefing on today's drug-resistant health threats. ( Available at: ) . , x 16 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Joint Statement on Importance of Outpatient Antibiotics Stewardship From 12 National Health Organizations. ( Available at: ) . , x 17 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Antibiotic/antimicrobial resistance (AR/AMR): the AMR challenge. ( Available at: ) . , x 18 White House Office of the Press Secretary. Fact sheet: over 150 (...) Antibiotic Use for the Urgent Management of Dental Pain and Intra-oral Swelling Clinical Practice Guideline Evidence-based clinical practice guideline on antibiotic use for the urgent management of pulpal- and periapical-related dental pain and intraoral swelling - The Journal of the American Dental Association Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Access provided by Volume 150, Issue 11, Pages 906–921.e12 Evidence-based clinical practice guideline

2020 American Dental Association Guidelines

10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Antibiotics

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Antibiotics Antibiotics | Prescribing information | Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Antibiotics Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Antibiotics Last revised in November 2019 Antibiotics Azithromycin Contraindications and cautions Do not prescribe azithromycin in people: With severe hepatic impairment. Prescribe azithromycin with caution in people: Who may be predisposed to prolongation of the QT interval. For example (...) any muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness. Typhoid vaccine — antibacterials might reduce the immune response. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that the antibacterial is stopped from 3 days before to 3 days after receiving live oral typhoid vaccine. Warfarin — concurrent use may increase the international normalized ratio (INR). Consider increasing INR monitoring as this interaction appears to develop over the first 7 days. Drugs that prolong the QT interval (such as amiodarone

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

11. Diarrhoea - antibiotic associated

Diarrhoea - antibiotic associated Diarrhoea - antibiotic associated | Topics A to Z | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Diarrhoea - antibiotic associated Diarrhoea - antibiotic associated Last revised in March 2019 Diarrhoea is a common consequence of treatment with antibiotics, occurring in 2–25% of people taking antibiotics Management Prescribing information Background information Diarrhoea - antibiotic associated: Summary Diarrhoea is a common consequence of treatment with antibiotics, occurring (...) in 2–25% of people taking antibiotics, depending on the antibiotic prescribed. Around 20% to 30% of cases of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea are due to Clostridium difficile . Antibiotics frequently associated with C. difficile infection include clindamycin, cephalosporins (especially third and fourth generation), fluoroquinolones, and broad-spectrum penicillins. Factors that increase the risk of C. difficile infection include increased age, history of C. difficile infection, exposure to other

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

12. Antibiotic Stewardship in the Intensive Care Unit: An Official ATS Workshop Report in Collaboration with the ACCN, ACCP, CDC, and SCCM Full Text available with Trip Pro

for ASPs by intensivists ( – ), the philosophical approaches and priorities of critical care practitioners and ASPs can differ ( ). Although all involved desire the best patient outcomes, the potentially competing goals of adequate empirical antimicrobial therapy and antibiotic stewardship sometimes create tension. If stewardship efforts are to succeed, this conflict must be addressed. The goal of most critical care practitioners is rapid provision of the appropriate initial therapy. ASPs must work (...) . Tamma PD , Avdic E , Li DX , Dzintars K , Cosgrove SE . Association of adverse events with antibiotic use in hospitalized patients . JAMA Intern Med 2017 ;177: 1308 – 1315 . , , 31 . Hranjec T , Rosenberger LH , Swenson B , Metzger R , Flohr TR , Politano AD , et al . Aggressive versus conservative initiation of antimicrobial treatment in critically ill surgical patients with suspected intensive-care-unit-acquired infection: a quasi-experimental, before and after observational cohort study . Lancet

2020 American Thoracic Society

13. FSRH CEU Response to study: Analysis of reports of unintended pregnancies associated with the combined use of non-enzyme inducing antibiotics and hormonal contraceptives

FSRH CEU Response to study: Analysis of reports of unintended pregnancies associated with the combined use of non-enzyme inducing antibiotics and hormonal contraceptives 1 FSRH CEU Response to study: Analysis of reports of unintended pregnancies associated with the combined use of non-enzyme inducing antibiotics and hormonal contraceptives 19 August 2020 The BMJ Evidence Based Medicine Journal has published a paper 1 suggesting that antibiotics may lessen the effectiveness of hormonal (...) contraception. The authors used the ‘Yellow Cards’ system where clinicians and patients can report adverse drug side-effects to the UK’s drug and medical devices regulator, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Data between 1963 and July 2018 was analysed and researchers compared the number of unintended pregnancies reported in 74,623 Yellow Cards for antibiotics in general and in 32,872 for enzyme-inducing drugs with those reported in 65,578 other types of drugs in users of oral

2020 Faculty of Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare

14. Pediatric hydrocephalus - Antibiotic-impregnated shunt systems versus conventional shunts in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis

. Journal of neurosurgery Pediatrics. 2008;2(1):25-28. Sciubba DM, Lin LM, Woodworth GF, McGirt MJ, Carson B, Jallo GI. Factors contributing to the medical costs of cerebrospinal fluid shunt infection treatment in pediatric patients with standard shunt components compared with those in patients with antibiotic impregnated components. In: Neurosurg Focus. Vol 22. United States2007:E9. Stone J, Gruber TJ, Rozzelle CJ. Healthcare savings associated with reduced infection rates using antimicrobial suture (...) bacterial catheter-related infection. Journal of neurosurgery. 1997;87(2):247-251. Pattavilakom A, Kotasnas D, Korman TM, Xenos C, Danks A. Duration of in vivo antimicrobial activity of antibiotic-impregnated cerebrospinal fluid catheters. In: Neurosurgery. Vol 58. United States2006:930-935; discussion 930-935. Albanese A, De Bonis P, Sabatino G, et al. Antibiotic-impregnated ventriculo-peritoneal shunts in patients at high risk of infection. Acta neurochirurgica. 2009;151(10):1259-1263. Aryan HE

2020 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

15. Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Dental Patients at Risk for Infection

of bacterial endocarditis: Recommendations by the American Heart Association. JAMA 1997;227(22):1794-801. 11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Antibiotic/ Antimicrobial resistance. About antimicrobial resistance: A brief overview. Available at: “https://www.cdc.gov/drug resistance/about.html”. Accessed March 26, 2019. Archived by WebCite ® at: “http://www.webcitation.org/ 779R5H5EJ”) 12. Glenny AM, Oliver R, Roberts GJ, Hooper L, Worthington HV. Antibiotics for the prophylaxis of bacterial (...) Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Dental Patients at Risk for Infection 416 THE REFERENCE MANUAL OF PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY BEST PRACTICES: ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS Purpose The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry ( AAPD) recog- nizes that numerous medical conditions predispose patients to bacteremia-induced infections. Because it is not possible to predict when a susceptible patient will develop an infection, prophylactic antibiotics are recommended when these patients undergo procedures

2019 American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

16. Use of Antibiotic Therapy for Pediatric Dental Patients

/MEDLINE database using the terms: antibiotic therapy, antibacterial agents, antimicrobial agents, dental trauma, oral wound management, orofacial infections, periodontal disease, viral disease, and oral contraception; fields: all; limits: within the last 10 years, humans, English, clinical trials, birth through age 18. Three hundred forty-three articles matched these criteria. Papers for review were chosen from this search and from hand searching. When data did not appear sufficient or were (...) derivatives remain the empirical choice for odontogenic infections; however, consideration of additional adjunctive antimicrobial therapy (i.e., metronidazole) can be given where there is anaerobic bacterial involvement. 13,16 Cephalosporins could be considered as an alternative choice for odontogenic infections. 16 Dental trauma Systemic antibiotics have been recommended as adjunctive therapy for avulsed permanent incisors with an open or closed apex. 17,18 Tetracycline (doxycycline twice daily for seven

2019 American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

17. Secondary bacterial infection of eczema and other common skin conditions: antimicrobial prescribing

bath emollient compared with non-antiseptic bath emollient for infected eczema 14 Rationales 15 Treatment 15 Advice 17 Reassessment 18 Referral and seeking specialist advice 19 Choice of antibiotic 19 Treatment 21 Context 22 Summary of the evidence 23 Antimicrobials 23 Choice of antibiotics 26 Course length 27 Route of administration 27 Other considerations 28 Medicines safety 28 Medicines adherence 28 Resource implications 28 Secondary bacterial infection of eczema and other common skin conditions (...) in conjunction with CG57. Overview Overview This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for secondary bacterial infection of eczema, and covers infection of other common skin conditions. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance. The recommendations are for adults, young people and children aged 72 hours and over. They do not cover diagnosis. This guideline updates and replaces some recommendations on managing infections in the NICE guideline on atopic eczema

2021 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

18. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Gynaecologic Procedures

Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Gynaecologic Procedures No. 275-Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Gynaecologic Procedures - Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Volume 40, Issue 10, Pages e723–e733 No. 275-Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Gynaecologic Procedures x Nancy Van Eyk , MD Halifax, NS x Julie van Schalkwyk , MD Vancouver, BC No. 275, April 2012 (Reaffirmed October 2018) DOI: To view the full text, please login as a subscribed (...) user or . Click to view the full text on ScienceDirect. Abstract Objective To review the evidence and provide recommendations on antibiotic prophylaxis for gynaecologic procedures. Outcomes Outcomes evaluated include need and effectiveness of antibiotics to prevent infections in gynaecologic procedures. Evidence Medline and The Cochrane Library were searched for articles published between January 1978 and January 2011 on the topic of antibiotic prophylaxis in gynaecologic procedures. Results were

2018 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

19. FSRH CEU statement on antibiotic cover for urgent insertion of intrauterine contraception in women at high risk of STI

FSRH CEU statement on antibiotic cover for urgent insertion of intrauterine contraception in women at high risk of STI FSRH CEU statement on antibiotic cover for urgent insertion of intrauterine contraception in women at high risk of STI (May 2019) - Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare FSRH CEU statement on antibiotic cover for urgent insertion of intrauterine contraception in women at high risk of STI (May 2019) FSRH CEU statement on antibiotic cover for urgent insertion (...) of intrauterine contraception in women at high risk of STI (May 2019) Share this article Published on: 22 May 2019 File size: 241kb PDF File type: Clinical Statements This statement provides guidance on antibiotic cover for urgent insertion of intrauterine contraception in women at high risk of STI. Download the full document here. Your download should start automatically. If not . Document types Thinking about taking a qualification? Registration is now quick and easy online. About FSRH FSRH is a faculty

2019 Faculty of Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare

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