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101. WHO recommendations on maternal health

Abbreviations iv Introduction 1 Promote, prevent and protect maternal and perinatal health 3 1. Antenatal care 3 Nutritional supplements 3 Maternal and fetal assessment 4 Preventive measures 6 Interventions for common physiological symptoms 7 Health systems interventions 8 2. Prevention of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia 9 3. Interventions to improve preterm birth outcomes 10 4. Prevention of maternal peripartum infections 12 5. Labour and child birth 13 Induction of labour 13 Delay in the first stage of labour (...) PREGNANCY EXPERIENCE Nutrition and nutritional supplements ¦ ¦ Counselling about healthy eating and keeping physically active during pregnancy is recommended for pregnant women to stay healthy and to prevent excessive weight gain during pregnancy. (Recommended). Source ¦ ¦ In undernourished populations, nutrition education on increasing daily energy and protein intake is recommended for pregnant women to reduce the risk of low-birth-weight neonates. (Context-specific recommendation). Source

2017 World Health Organisation Guidelines

102. ABCD position statement on standards of care for management of adults with type 1 diabetes

Wilmott Marc Atkin PratiK Choudhury 2 Contents Introduction 1. Diagnosis of type 1 diabetes 1.1 Criteria for diagnosis of diabetes 1.2 Differentiating between type 1 and type 2 diabetes 1.3 Immediate treatment 1.4 Autoimmune conditions associated with type 1 diabetes 2. Initial management 2.1 Education 2.2 Nutritional advice 2.3 Physical activity and exercise 3. Follow up consultations and ongoing support 3.1 Consultation process 3.2 Annual review 3.3 Psychological support 4. Treatment, targets (...) . ? Delivered by trained educators 9 ? Quality assurance with regular audit NB. Many people require regular educational updates; the need for further education should be reviewed annually 2.2 Nutritional advice Individualised nutritional advice, delivered by a specialist dietitian, should include carbohydrate counting and healthy eating, taking into account individual cardiovascular risk, need for weight control, alcohol management. 2.3 Physical activity and exercise Recommendations for physical activity

2017 Association of British Clinical Diabetologists

105. WHO recommendations on adolescent health

and physical activity Tobacco 8. Violence and injury prevention 9. Prevention of mental health problems and promotion of mental health 10. Nutrition Management of adolescent conditions 11. HIV testing and counselling for adolescents living with HIV 12. Antiretroviral Therapy 13. Treatment of skin and oral HIV-associated conditions in children and adults 14. Treatment of sexually transmitted infections 15. Treatment of malaria 16. Treatment of malnutrition 17. Violence and injuries 18. Mental disorders 36 (...) , send sputum samples for tuberculosis testing and refer to hospital for assessment. • Follow up in 3 days if still febrile.32 WHO RECOMMENDATIONS ON ADOLESCENT HEALTH 16. MANAGEMENT OF MALNUTRITION 12 (adolescent-relevant recommendations) Nutritional care and support for patients with tuberculosis: Management of severe acute malnutrition ¦ ¦School-age children and adolescents (5 to 19 years), and adults, including pregnant and lactating women, with active TB and severe acute malnutrition should

2017 World Health Organisation Guidelines

106. Roadmap for Zoonotic Tuberculosis

organization for setting international standards for animal health and zoonoses. The OIE is also responsible for collecting and sharing animal disease data and strengthening national animal health systems. The OIE lists bovine TB as a notifiable disease, recognizing its importance as an animal disease and zoonosis. The Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has a global mandate to improve food security, nutrition and agricultural productivity and reduce rural poverty. FAO has

2017 International Union Against TB and Lung Disease

107. Assessment and Management of Oesophageal Varices in Children

Assessment and Management of Oesophageal Varices in Children Assessment and Management of Oesophageal Varices in Children December 2017 Guideline of British Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (BSPGHAN) Introduction These guidelines were constructed after a joint audit and review of practice at the three specialised paediatric hepatology centres in June 2016, and wider consultation with BSPGHAN Council, Liver Steering Group and Endoscopy Working Group. Although (...) 0113 3927450 Fax 0113 3925129 (Admin Office) or 0113 3923110 (Ward Doctors Office) KING’S, LONDON Paediatric Liver, Gastroenterology and Nutrition Centre, King’s College Hospital, London Phone 020 3299 9000 Fax 0202 3299 4228 Bleep 426 weekdays 9am-5pm Phone 07866792368 (5pm-9am) 5. Secondary prophylaxis Perioperative management is as for primary prophylaxis. There is currently insufficient evidence to recommend use of non-selective beta blockers in primary or secondary prophylaxis in children

2017 British Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition

108. WHO recommendations on newborn health

such a recommendation. (Weak recommendation, moderate to low quality evidence). Source ¦ ¦ VLBW infants should be given 10ml/kg per day of enteral feeds, preferably expressed breast milk, starting from the first day of life, with the remaining fluid requirement met by intravenous fluids. (Weak situational recommendation relevant to resource-limited settings where total parenteral nutrition is not possible, low to very low quality evidence). Source ¦ ¦ LBW infants should be exclusively breastfed until 6 months

2017 World Health Organisation Guidelines

110. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: diagnosis and management

. 1.6 Dietary advice 1.6.1 Healthcare professionals should stress the value of a balanced diet, good nutrition and regular exercise for children, young people and adults with ADHD. [2008] [2008] 1.6.2 Do not advise elimination of artificial colouring and additives from the diet as a generally applicable treatment for children and young people with ADHD. [2016] [2016] 1.6.3 Ask about foods or drinks that appear to influence hyperactive behaviour as part of the clinical assessment of ADHD in children (...) and ensure review by the healthcare professional responsible for treatment. [2018] [2018] 1.8.6 If weight loss is a clinical concern, consider the following strategies: taking medication either with or after food, rather than before meals taking additional meals or snacks early in the morning or late in the evening when stimulant effects have worn off obtaining dietary advice consuming high-calorie foods of good nutritional value taking a planned break from treatment changing medication. [2018] [2018

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

111. ABCD position statement on standards of care for management of adults with type 1 diabetes - this has been superseded by the 2017 version - see above

Immediate treatment 1.4 Autoimmune conditions associated with type 1 diabetes 2. Initial management 2.1 Education 2.2 Nutritional advice 2.3 Physical activity and exercise 3. Follow up consultations and ongoing support 3.1 Consultation process 3.2 Annual review 3.3 Psychological support 4. Treatment, targets and monitoring 4.1 Treatment 4.2 Targets 4.3 Monitoring 4.4 Unexplained or unpredictable blood glucose results 5. Long term complications:screening and management 5.1 Screening and treatment (...) re.gular educational updates; the need for further education should be reviewed annually 2.2 Nutritional advice Individualised nutritional advice, delivered by a specialist dietitian, should include carbohydrate counting and healthy eating, taking into account individual cardiovascular risk, need for weight control, alcohol management. 2.3 Physical activity and exercise Recommendations for physical activity are the same as for those without diabetes, taking into account any restrictions imposed

2016 Association of British Clinical Diabetologists

112. Collaborative Framework for Care and Control of Tuberculosis and Diabetes

adverse treatment outcomes are frequent, reasons may include poor adherence to treatment, high prevalence of drug-resistance and/or vulnerability related to co-morbidities such as HIV, under-nutrition, substance dependency, tobacco smoking-related conditions and diabetes. Third, although rates of incidence, prevalence and death from TB are decreasing globally, the rate of decline is much slower than forecast (1). Given this slow rate of decline, the Millennium Development Goal target of halving TB (...) . The proposed framework builds on the experience of TB/HIV collaboration, and applies its key elements to TB and diabetes. The elements could also be further applied to other risk factors for TB and associated co-morbidities. WHO and its partners are reviewing the impact of other TB risk factors and co-morbidities, such as tobacco smoking-related conditions (25), under-nutrition (26), alcohol dependency (27) and substance abuse (28). Ideally, a future collaborative framework should encompass coordination

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2011 International Union Against TB and Lung Disease

114. Laboratory Diagnosis of Tuberculosis by Sputum Microscopy: The Handbook

’ response to treatment. The Global Health Bureau, Office of Health, Infectious Disease and Nutrition (HIDN), US Agency for International Development, financially supports the development of The Handbook: Laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis by sputum microscopy through TB CARE I under the terms of Agreement No. AID-OAA-A-10-00020. This publication was made possible by the generous support of the American people through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The contents

2013 International Union Against TB and Lung Disease

115. A Framework for Integrating Childhood Tuberculosis into Community-based Health Care

, health initiatives that operate at primary health care and community levels often do not include childhood TB as one of their target illnesses, even in countries with a high TB burden. Policy makers as well as health care providers for maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, and nutrition need to be sensitized to the importance of childhood TB. This document outlines community-based strategies for integrating childhood TB activities with other maternal and child health care services through existing (...) treatment, report to NTP10 1. Ask for TB contact in a child that • initially presented with cough, was treated with antibiotics for pneumonia and did not respond • does not respond to nutritional support for malnutrition • has recurring pneumonia Refer and mark “TB contact” on referal card Action: Assess the Risk 2. Include TB into follow-up considerations Follow-up of sick children is often within the scope of work of Community Health Workers 3. Contact tracing Another missed opportunity for community

2014 International Union Against TB and Lung Disease

116. Desk guide for diagnosis and management of TB in children - Africa

Desk guide for diagnosis and management of TB in children - Africa THE UNION’S DESK GUIDE FOR DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF TB IN CHILDREN THIRD EDITION 20163 The Union’s desk guide for diagnosis and management of TB in children Third edition 2016The Global Health Bureau, Office of Health, Infectious Disease and Nutrition (HIDN), US Agency for International Development, financially supports this guide through Challenge TB under the terms of Agreement No. AID-OAA-A-14-00029. This guide is made (...) Extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB) is also common and presentation varies with age Important to always consider Age and nutritional status Risk factors for TB infection: history of contact with a TB patient Risk factors for TB disease: young age, HIV-infected, malnourished, recent measles, recent contact Most TB cases occur in children less than 5 years of age The younger the child, the more likely to identify a close contact with TB disease TB disease can be more severe and of rapid onset in infants

2016 International Union Against TB and Lung Disease

117. Desk guide for diagnosis and management of TB in children - Asia

Desk guide for diagnosis and management of TB in children - Asia THE UNION’S DESK GUIDE FOR DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF TB IN CHILDREN THIRD EDITION 20163 The Union’s desk guide for diagnosis and management of TB in children Third edition 2016The Global Health Bureau, Office of Health, Infectious Disease and Nutrition (HIDN), US Agency for International Development, financially supports this guide through Challenge TB under the terms of Agreement No. AID-OAA-A-14-00029. This guide is made (...) Extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB) is also common and presentation varies with age Important to always consider Age and nutritional status Risk factors for TB infection: history of contact with a TB patient Risk factors for TB disease: young age, HIV-infected, malnourished, recent measles, recent contact Most TB cases occur in children less than 5 years of age The younger the child, the more likely to identify a close contact with TB disease TB disease can be more severe and of rapid onset in infants

2016 International Union Against TB and Lung Disease

119. Routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction ? A guide for fertility staff

behaviour, exercise, nutrition, and compliance) Fertility staff should be aware that • one in 10 patients referred for fertility treatment chooses not to start treatment.(C) • the reasons patients state for not starting any type of recommended fertility treatment are: rejection of treatment (due to ethical objections, concerns about and lack of interest in treatment), personal reasons, relational problems, financial issues, and psychological burden of treatment.(B) • the reasons patients on the waiting (...) OF PATIENTS BEFORE TREATMENT? GENERAL RECOMMENDATION The guideline development group recommends that fertility staff • offer patients the opportunity to have their needs assessed and be informed about their emotional adjustment before the start of treatment.(GPP) • use the tools listed in Appendix 2 when assessing patients’ needs.(GPP) Behavioural needs (lifestyle behaviour, exercise, nutrition, and compliance) Fertility staff should • be aware that currently there are no reliable pre-treatment tools

2015 European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology

120. Care in the Last Days of Life

or clinical interventions : consider, and regularly review, appropriateness, benefit and burdens (eg blood tests, radiology, vital signs and regular blood sugar monitoring). Make a clear record of any interventions that are not appropriate. Assisted hydration or nutrition: consider the benefits and risks; review plan regularly. Over-hydration can contribute to distressing respiratory secretions. However, where indicated, a slow SC fluid infusion may be considered on an individual basis (see guideline (...) Midazolam SC 5 to 20mg + morphine SC 5 to 10mg or diamorphine 5 to 10mg (if no previous opioid use); given in a syringe pump over 24 hours. Last Days of Life - Table 4 Breathlessness - Version 1 June 2014 Respiratory tract secretions Reduce risk by avoiding fluid overload; review any assisted hydration or nutrition (intravenous [IV] or SC fluids, feeding) if symptoms develop. Suction may also exacerbate secretions. Changing the patient’s position, for example head down or lateral position may help

2015 Scottish Palliative Care Guidelines

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