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881. Clinical practice guidelines for the psychosocial care of adults with cancer

WITH C ANCER These guidelines have been developed to promote awareness of the psychosocial needs of patients and inform health professionals of those evidence-based interventions that may improve adjustment and outcome for patients. However, the psychosocial care of patients is not conducted in a vacuum, and the training, skills, attitudes and beliefs of health professionals will affect clinical care, often in subtle ways. Furthermore, the clinical care of patients with severe, disabling or life

2003 National Breast and Ovarian Cancer Centre

882. UK National Guideline on the sexual health of people with HIV: sexually transmitted infections

for disclosure to the party at risk after notification of the original patient. It is then up to that individual to decide whether to take the matter further in a legal sense. Where the other party has no capacity to consent (e.g. through learning disabilities or because they are under the age of consent), then the clinician can report the matter on their behalf. The British HIV Association are in the process of producing a briefing paper to cover these complex and rapidly evolving issues [108]. At time

2006 British Association for Sexual Health and HIV

884. Assault/Abuse - suspected abuse of vulnerable adults/recognition of abuse

to take risks and may choose to live at risk if they have the capacity to make such a decision. Their wishes should not be overruled lightly. For example, most older people are not ‘confused’. Similarly, people with learning disabilities or mental health problems may have the capacity to make some decisions about their lives, but not others. All Local Authorities should have Inter-Agency Adult Protection Procedures which comply with the ‘No Secrets’ guidance 1 and many authorities will also have (...) other special needs themselves. Who is vulnerable to abuse? Particular groups of people may be more vulnerable to abuse. These include people from minority ethnic groups, people with physical disabilities, people with learning disabilities, mental health problems, severe physical illnesses, older people, the homeless, people with sensory impairments or those diagnosed as HIV positive. Some people with special needs (e.g. sensory impairment or learning disabilities) may demonstrate challenging

2007 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

885. Assault/Abuse - safeguarding children

include neglect of, or unresponsiveness to, a child’s basic emotional needs. Safeguarding Children Treatment and Management of Assault October 2006 Page 5 of 14 Treatment & Management of AssaultWHO IS VULNERABLE TO ABUSE? Although any child can potentially be a victim of abuse, there are some groups of children who may be particularly vulnerable. These include children with learning disabilities, severe physical illnesses or sensory impairments. Sources of stress within families may have a negative (...) -injury ? running away and ?re-setting ? environmental factors and situation of parents (e.g. domestic violence, drug or alcohol abuse, learning disabilities). These notes have been developed for training purposes and should be read in conjunction with the ambulance service’s operational procedure – Suspected Cases of Child Abuse and Report Forms for the Protection of Children and Vulnerable Adults. Safeguarding Children Page 10 of 14 October 2006 Treatment and Management of Assault Treatment

2007 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

886. Paediatric - convulsions in children

Paediatric - convulsions in children Convulsions in Children Paediatric Guidelines INTRODUCTION A convulsion is a period of involuntary muscular contraction, often followed by a period of profound lethargy and confusion and sometimes profound sleep. Most convulsions in children under the age of 5 years will be due to febrile convulsions. The ?rst convulsion can be very frightening for the parents. Children with learning disabilities or congenital syndromes may have epilepsy as part

2007 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

887. Workplace interventions for people with common mental health problems

problems as those that:- • occur most frequently and are more prevalent; • are mostly successfully treated in primary rather than secondary care settings; • are least disabling in terms of stigmatising attitudes and discriminatory behaviour. We focused broadly on themes of prevention, retention and rehabilitation. Our main research questions were:- • What is the evidence for preventative programmes at work and what are the conditions under which they are most effective? • For those employees identified (...) to moderate mental ill health, as being the clearest and most useful for the range of audiences for this review. We have defined common mental health problems as those that:- • occur most frequently; • are mostly successfully treated in primary care settings; • are least disabling in terms of public reaction. People experiencing common mental health problems, as well as their families, physicians and employers, are most likely to use terms such as anxiety or depression (nerves) to articulate this set

2005 British Occupational Health Research Foundation

888. Ethical Issues - consent

the option not to treat and the likely consequences ? explanation of likely bene?ts of treatment ? a reminder that the patient can change their mind about consent at any time. In practice, patients also need to be able to communicate their decision. Care should be taken not to underestimate the ability of a patient to communicate, whatever their condition. 8,9 Many people with learning disabilities have the capacity to consent if time is spent explaining the issues in simple language, using visual aids

2007 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

889. Convulsions in children

Convulsions in children Convulsions in Children Paediatric Guidelines INTRODUCTION A convulsion is a period of involuntary muscular contraction, often followed by a period of profound lethargy and confusion and sometimes profound sleep. Most convulsions in children under the age of 5 years will be due to febrile convulsions. The ?rst convulsion can be very frightening for the parents. Children with learning disabilities or congenital syndromes may have epilepsy as part of the condition

2006 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

890. Safeguarding children

include neglect of, or unresponsiveness to, a child’s basic emotional needs. Safeguarding Children Treatment and Management of Assault October 2006 Page 5 of 14 Treatment & Management of AssaultWHO IS VULNERABLE TO ABUSE? Although any child can potentially be a victim of abuse, there are some groups of children who may be particularly vulnerable. These include children with learning disabilities, severe physical illnesses or sensory impairments. Sources of stress within families may have a negative (...) -injury ? running away and ?re-setting ? environmental factors and situation of parents (e.g. domestic violence, drug or alcohol abuse, learning disabilities). These notes have been developed for training purposes and should be read in conjunction with the ambulance service’s operational procedure – Suspected Cases of Child Abuse and Report Forms for the Protection of Children and Vulnerable Adults. Safeguarding Children Page 10 of 14 October 2006 Treatment and Management of Assault Treatment

2006 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

891. Suspected abuse of vulnerable adults and recognition of abuse

to take risks and may choose to live at risk if they have the capacity to make such a decision. Their wishes should not be overruled lightly. For example, most older people are not ‘confused’. Similarly, people with learning disabilities or mental health problems may have the capacity to make some decisions about their lives, but not others. All Local Authorities should have Inter-Agency Adult Protection Procedures which comply with the ‘No Secrets’ guidance 1 and many authorities will also have (...) other special needs themselves. Who is vulnerable to abuse? Particular groups of people may be more vulnerable to abuse. These include people from minority ethnic groups, people with physical disabilities, people with learning disabilities, mental health problems, severe physical illnesses, older people, the homeless, people with sensory impairments or those diagnosed as HIV positive. Some people with special needs (e.g. sensory impairment or learning disabilities) may demonstrate challenging

2006 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

892. Consent for anaesthesia 2 revised edition 2006

of anaesthesia), disability (stroke, deafness and blindness) should be provided Consent A5 10/1/06 15:49 Page 14in written information, as should the very small risk of death. It is good practice to include an estimate of the incidence of the risk [22]. Anaesthetists must be prepared to discuss these risks at the pre-operative visit if the patient asks about them; • specific risks or complications that may be of increased significance to the patient, for example, the risk of vocal cord damage if the patient (...) these is not always easy, but what is actually being done is more important than the label attached. The need for participants’ consent and for review by an independent Research Ethics Committee is no different in anaesthetic and related research to any other area of medical research, and anaesthetists are referred to the copious guidelines and regulations that already exist [29]. 10.2 Learning/maintaining practical skills 10.2.1 Although practical procedures can be rehearsed and practised on manikins

2006 Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland

893. Care and Maintenance to Reduce Vascular Access Complications

: nurses themselves, other healthcare colleagues, nurse educators in academic and practice settings, and employers. After lodging these guidelines into their minds and hearts, knowledgeable and skillful nurses and nursing students need healthy and supportive work environments to help bring these guidelines to life. We ask that you share this NBPG, and others, with members of the interdisciplinary team. There is much to learn from one another. Together, we can ensure that Ontarians receive the best

2005 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

894. Embracing Cultural Diversity in Health Care: Developing Cultural Competence

will now adopt these BPGs and implement them in their worksites. We ask that you evaluate their impact and tell us what works and what doesn’t, so that we continuously learn from you, and revise these guidelines informed by evidence and practice. Partnerships such as this one are destined to produce splendid results – learning communities – all eager to network and share expertise. The resulting synergy will be felt within the BPG movement, in the workplaces, and by those who receive nursing care (...) . Creating healthy work environments is both a collective and an individual responsibility. Successful uptake of these guidelines requires the concerted effort of nurse administrators, nursing staff and advanced practice nurses, nurses in policy, education and research, and health care colleagues from other disciplines across the organization. It also requires full institutional support from CEO’ s and their Boards. We ask that you share this guideline with all. There is much we can learn from each other

2007 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

895. Nursing Management of Hypertension

healthy and supportive work environments to help bring these guidelines to life. We ask that you share this guideline with members of the interdisciplinary team. There is much to learn from one another. Together, we can ensure that Ontarians receive the best possible care every time they come in contact with us. Let’s make them the real winners in this important effort! The RNAO is pleased to have had the pleasure of working with the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario in this important initiative (...) hypertension management by providers requires professional education. The introduction of professional education resources and interventions that utilize the principles of adult learning, along with an interdisciplinary team approach, is expected to maximize the impact on high blood pressure reduction and control. Developing and disseminating best practice guidelines for hypertension is another essential part of professional education. Participating with RNAO in the Nursing Best Practice Guidelines Program

2005 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

896. Woman Abuse: Screening, Identification and Initial Response

healthcare colleagues, nurse educators in academic and practice settings, and employers. After lodging these guidelines into their minds and hearts, knowledgeable and skillful nurses and nursing students need healthy and supportive work environments to help bring these guidelines to life. We ask that you share this NBPG, and others, with members of the interdisciplinary team. There is much to learn from one another. Together, we can ensure that Ontarians receive the best possible care every time (...) is spared. However, it is important to be mindful that “harm comes to the most vulnerable” (Graham, 2000, p. 33) including, but not limited to, lesbian women, lone mothers, women with mental health issues, women with disabilities, and elderly women (Butterworth 2004; Eckert, Sugar, & Fine, 2002; Graham, 2000; Larkin, Hyman, Mathias, D’Amico, & MacLeod,1999; McClennen, Summers, & Daley, 2002; McFarlane et al., 2001). In this guideline, the development panel recommends that screening be conducted with all

2005 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

897. Reducing Foot Complications for People with Diabetes

: nurses themselves, other healthcare colleagues, nurse educators in academic and practice settings, and employers. After lodging these guidelines into their minds and hearts, knowledgeable and skillful nurses and nursing students need healthy and supportive work environments to help bring these guidelines to life. We ask that you share this NBPG, and others, with members of the interdisciplinary team. There is much to learn from one another. T ogether, we can ensure that Ontarians receive the best (...) . *See pg.14 for details regarding “Interpretation of Evidence”12 Reducing Foot Complications for People with Diabetes RECOMMENDATION LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 5.2 Education should be tailored to client’s current knowledge, IV individual needs, and risk factors. Principles of adult learning must be used. 6.0 Individuals assessed as being at "higher" risk for foot ulcer/amputation IV should be advised of their risk status and referred to their primary care provider for additional assessment or to specialized

2004 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

898. Nursing Care of Dyspnea:The 6th Vital Sign in Individuals with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

? Successful uptake of these NBPGs requires a concerted effort of four groups: nurses themselves, other healthcare colleagues, nurse educators in academic and practice settings, and employers. After lodging these guidelines into their minds and hearts, knowledgeable and skillful nurses and nursing students need healthy and supportive work environments to help bring these guidelines to life. We ask that you share this NBPG, and others, with members of the interdisciplinary team. There is much to learn from (...) costs. 8.1 Palliative care services must be available for individuals living with COPD III and their caregivers. 8.2 Nursing research related to interventions for individuals with COPD must IV be supported. 8.3 All Nursing programs should include dyspnea associated with COPD as one IV context for learning core curricula concepts. 8.4 Funding regulations for oxygen therapy must be revisited to include those IV individuals with severe dyspnea, reduced ventilatory capacity and reduced exercise

2005 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

899. Stroke Assessment Across the Continuum of Care

and skillful nurses and nursing students need healthy and supportive work environments to help bring these guidelines to life. We ask that you share this guideline with members of the interdisciplinary team. There is much to learn from one another. Together, we can ensure that Ontarians receive the best possible care every time they come in contact with us. Let’s make them the real winners of this important effort! The RNAO is pleased to have had the opportunity to work with the HSFO in this important (...) and intervention is necessary. In situations where concerns are identified, clients should be referred to a trained healthcare professional for further assessment and management. Client and Caregiver – 14.0 Nurses in all practice settings should assess the stroke client and their caregivers’ IV Readiness to Learn learning needs, abilities, learning preferences and readiness to learn. This assessment should be ongoing as the client moves through the continuum of care and as education is provided. Documentation

2005 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

900. Adjuvant therapy

Adjuvant therapy Adjuvant therapy | CMAJ Main menu User menu Search Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Article Adjuvant therapy Nonsteroidal inhaled anti-inflammatory agents (anti-allergic agents) Disodium cromoglycate There is excellent evidence that disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) therapy can reduce symptoms,[ , ] disability and costly emergency room visits and admissions to hospital for asthma. The associated improvement in pulmonary function is relatively small or nil (...) compromising clinical benefit by aiming for serum concentrations of 28-55 μmol/L, rather than the previously recommended 55-110 μmol/L. Some studies have suggested that theophylline could cause behavioural changes and learning difficulties in children, but these findings have not been confirmed elsewhere.[ , ] Concomitant use of theophylline and the new leukotriene antagonists may lower the serum concentration of certain of the leukotriene antagonists, but not the theophylline concentration. In chronic

1999 CPG Infobase

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