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Assessment of Physical Function

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41. Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient

assessment include an evaluation of comorbid conditions, function of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and risk of aspiration. We suggest not using traditional nutrition indicators or surrogate markers, as they are not validated in critical care. Rationale: In the critical care setting, the traditional serum protein markers (albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, retinol-binding protein) are a reflection of the acute phase response (increases in vascular permeability and reprioritization of hepatic protein (...) , given its ease of use and availability ( , ). A CT scan provides a precise quantification of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue depots; however it is quite costly unless a scan taken for other purposes is used to determine body composition ( , ). Both may be valuable future tools to incorporate into nutrition assessment; however, validation and reliability studies in ICU patients are still pending. Assessment of muscle function is still in its infancy. Its measurement, reproducibility

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2016 Society of Critical Care Medicine

42. Evidence-Based Policy Making: Assessment of the American Heart Association?s Strategic Policy Portfolio

behavior, having metabolic complements as well, BMI reflects the balance of energy intake and output resulting from dietary and physical activity behaviors, such that positive energy balance (excess of intake over output) increases adiposity. Although not explicitly prioritized by the AHA in its policy agenda, the association has adopted the American Medical Association’s Expert Committee recommendations on the assessment, prevention, and treatment of child and adolescent obesity. These include regular (...) BMI assessment during clinical visits, appropriate behavioral counseling to improve diet and physical activity behaviors, provider training and continuing education on best practice in delivering behavioral interventions, surveillance of BMI in schools and at the state level, and support for measurement and recording of BMI as a Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set measure. Clinicians identify overweight and obese children according to their BMI. Advocacy for this clinical approach

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2016 American Heart Association

43. Importance of Assessing Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Clinical Practice: A Case for Fitness as a Clinical Vital Sign: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

, PT, FAHA , MD, MPH, PhD , PhD, FAHA , PhD, FAHA , PhD , PhD, FAHA , MD, FAHA , MD , PhD, FAHA , MD, PhD, MBA , MD , PhD , and MD, MPH, PhD PhDOn behalf of the American Heart Association Physical Activity Committee of the Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health; Council on Clinical Cardiology; Council on Epidemiology and Prevention; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology; and Stroke Council Robert Ross , Steven N. Blair , Ross (...) the atmosphere to the mitochondria to perform physical work. It therefore quantifies the functional capacity of an individual and is dependent on a linked chain of processes that include pulmonary ventilation and diffusion, right and left ventricular function (both systole and diastole), ventricular-arterial coupling, the ability of the vasculature to accommodate and efficiently transport blood from the heart to precisely match oxygen requirements, and the ability of the muscle cells to receive and use

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2016 American Heart Association

44. Clinical Recommendations for Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing Data Assessment in Specific Patient Populations

influence on the functional assessment of patients with confirmed/suspected CV and pulmonary disease as well as those with certain confirmed/suspected musculoskeletal disorders. Although still underutilized, CPX has gained popularity not only due to the recognition of its clear value in the functional assessment of patients with CV, pulmonary, and musculoskeletal disease/disorders, but also because of technological advances (eg, rapid response analyzers and computer-assisted data processing) which have (...) possesses the unique ability to comprehensively assess the independent and integrated exertional responses of the CV and pulmonary systems. Moreover, the majority of current CPX systems have the capability to perform pulmonary function testing. Therefore, in patients presenting with unexplained exertional dyspnea, CPX is considered an important assessment to determine the mechanism of exercise intolerance. , When CPX is utilized for this indication, a primary goal should be to reproduce the patient's

2012 American Heart Association

45. Assessment scales for disorders of consciousness: evidence-based recommendations for clinical practice and research

, psychometric properties, and clinical utility of second- generation DOC behavioral assessment scales. To address this critical need, the ACRM BI-ISIG DOC Task Force conducted a systematic, evidence-based literature review to evaluate the extent that each DOC scale (1) has content that differentiates VS, MCS, and emergence from MCS; (2) pro- duces reliable ratings between examiners and over time; (3) generates valid diagnostic ?ndings; and (4) predicts functional outcomes. Recommendations are made to guide (...) Assessment scales for disorders of consciousness: evidence-based recommendations for clinical practice and research ThisarticleappearedinajournalpublishedbyElsevier. Theattached copyisfurnishedtotheauthorforinternalnon-commercialresearch andeducationuse,includingforinstructionattheauthorsinstitution andsharingwithcolleagues. Otheruses,includingreproductionanddistribution,orsellingor licensingcopies,orpostingtopersonal,institutionalorthirdparty websitesareprohibited

2010 American Academy of Neurology

46. Nutrition Screening, Assessment, and Intervention in Adult

is a rigorous process that includes obtaining diet and medical history, current clinical status, anthropomet- ric data, laboratory data, physical assessment informa- tion, and often functional and economic information; estimating nutrient requirements; and, usually, selecting a treatment plan. Clinical skill, resource availability, and the setting determine the specific methods used to per- form a clinical nutrition assessment. 6,7 Evidence-based Clinical Guidelines for specific diseases and conditions may (...) history, appetite, feeding mode Albumin, prealbumin, cholesterol, lymphocyte count Self-perception of nutrition and health status Subjective Global Assessment 25 Weight history, diet history Primary diagnosis, stress level Physical symptoms (subcutaneous fat, mus- cle wasting, ankle edema, sacral edema, ascites), functional capacity, gas- trointestinal symptoms BMI, body mass index. Table 2. Obesity Classification and Risk Obesity Class BMI, kg/m 2 Underweight 102 Women > 88 BMI, body mass index

2011 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

47. Practice Parameters for the Use of Actigraphy in the Assessment of Sleep and Sleep Disorders: An Update for 2007

in estimating total sleep time (TST) in patients with sleep apnea and combining this with tests of respiratory function in order to calculate the most common measure of apnea severity, the apnea- hypopnea index (AHI). Actigraphy can provide an assessment of TST (as it does in some other disorders), and when used along with a valid test for the presence and type of breathing abnor- mality, can improve the calculation of AHI compared with us- ing time in bed. Several other studies used actigraphy as part (...) , and that working mothers had an average 6-7 minutes less sleep in 24 hours than nonworking mothers. Older children and adolescents were subjects in several other studies. A Level 4b study 80 which assessed the ability of measures of emotional intensity (maternal rating, vagal functioning) to pre- dict actigraphically determined sleep problems in healthy school- aged children, found that increased emotional intensity was cor- related with reduced nocturnal sleep and increased night activity. A Level 2 study 81

2007 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

48. Neutralizing antibodies to interferon-beta: assessment of their clinical and radiographic impact

Neutralizing antibodies to interferon-beta: assessment of their clinical and radiographic impact Neutralizing antibodies to interferon beta: Assessment of their clinical and radiographic impact: An evidence report | Neurology Advertisement Search for this keyword Main menu User menu Search Search for this keyword The most widely read and highly cited peer-reviewed neurology journal Share March 27, 2007 ; 68 (13) Special Article Neutralizing antibodies to interferon beta: Assessment (...) of their clinical and radiographic impact: An evidence report Report of the Therapeutics and Technology Assessment Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology D. S. Goodin , E. M. Frohman , B. Hurwitz , P. W. O’Connor , J. J. Oger , A. T. Reder , J. C. Stevens First published March 26, 2007, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1212/01.wnl.0000258545.73854.cf D. S. Goodin E. M. Frohman B. Hurwitz P. W. O’Connor J. J. Oger A. T. Reder J. C. Stevens Neutralizing antibodies to interferon beta: Assessment

2007 American Academy of Neurology

49. Cardiovascular Risk in Asymptomatic Adults: Guideline For Assessment of

PATIENTS OR GUIDING THERAPY e66 2.5. Cardiac and Vascular Tests for Risk Assessment in Asymptomatic Adults e66 2.5.1. Resting Electrocardiogram e66 2.5.1.1. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR RESTING ELECTROCARDIOGRAM e66 2.5.1.2. GENERAL DESCRIPTION e67 2.5.1.3. ASSOCIATION WITH INCREASED RISK AND INCREMENTAL RISK e67 2.5.1.4. USEFULNESS IN MOTIVATING PATIENTS, GUIDING THERAPY, AND IMPROVING OUTCOMES e68 2.5.2. Resting Echocardiography for Left Ventricular Structure and Function and Left Ventricular Hypertrophy (...) Cardiovascular Risk in Asymptomatic Adults: Guideline For Assessment of PRACTICE GUIDELINES 2010 ACCF/AHA Guideline for Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk in Asymptomatic Adults A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines Developed in Collaboration With the American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society of Atherosclerosis Imaging and Prevention, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography

2010 American College of Cardiology

50. Recipient Assessment for Transplantation - Paediatric recipients

, with immobility). After median follow-up of 20 months, all patients survived, had good graft function and showed improved quality of life. In this series, the incidence of complications associated with transplantation were similar to a control group of recipients without mental retardation [54]. SUMMARY OF THE EVIDENCE In summary, transplantation is the primary goal for children with end stage kidney disease and results in improvements in growth, physical and intellectual development. Data from a number (...) Recipient Assessment for Transplantation - Paediatric recipients ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Recipient Assessment for Transplantation March 2013 Page 1 of 8 Paediatric recipient Date written: November 2011 Author: Steven McTaggart Guidelines a. In relation to age at the time of transplantation we recommend that: There be no lower age limit set for transplantation (1B) In infants under 1 year of age, transplantation

2013 KHA-CARI Guidelines

51. Hearing loss in adults: assessment and management

1.4.1 Consider a steroid to treat idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss in adults. 1.5 Assessment and management in audiology services 1.5.1 Include and record the following as part of the audiological assessment for adults: a full history including relevant symptoms, comorbidities, cognitive ability, physical mobility and dexterity the person's hearing and communication needs at home, at work or in education, and in social situations any psychosocial difficulties related to hearing (...) Hearing loss in adults: assessment and management Hearing loss in adults: assessment and Hearing loss in adults: assessment and management management NICE guideline Published: 21 June 2018 nice.org.uk/guidance/ng98 © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

52. Dementia: assessment, management and support for people living with dementia and their carers

of 42psychological symptoms, and the impact symptoms have on their daily life): from the person with suspected dementia and and if possible, from someone who knows the person well (such as a family member). 1.2.2 If dementia is still suspected after initial assessment: conduct a physical examination and and undertake appropriate blood and urine tests to exclude reversible causes of cognitive decline and and use cognitive testing. 1.2.3 When using cognitive testing, use a validated brief structured cognitive (...) in the Elderly (IQCODE) or the Functional Activities Questionnaire (FAQ). 1.2.6 Refer the person to a specialist dementia diagnostic service (such as a memory clinic or community old age psychiatry service) if: reversible causes of cognitive decline (including delirium, depression, sensory Dementia: assessment, management and support for people living with dementia and their carers (NG97) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

53. A National Guideline for the Assessment and Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Australia

of Functioning and a Medical Evaluation. Assessment of Functioning The purpose of this assessment is to obtain a detailed understanding of an individual’s level of ability across a broad range of areas, including cognitive abilities, speech and language function, and daily living skills. Some of the information collected during this assessment will be about: medical and health history family history developmental and functional abilities. An Assessment of Functioning can be performed by one or more medical (...) and/or allied health professionals. This could be a medical practitioner (e.g. GP, paediatrician, psychiatrist), nurse practitioner, occupational therapist, psychologist, social worker or speech pathologist with relevant training and expertise. Medical Evaluation The purpose of this evaluation is to understand if there are medical causes for the behaviours that have prompted a referral for an assessment. A Medical Evaluation involves: a general physical examination other specific medical tests. A Medical

2018 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

54. Diagnosis, Assessment and Management of Constipation in Advanced Cancer: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines

daily) or pla- cebo. The Bowel Function Inventory (BFI) was used to assess con- stipation. Patients taking a combined oral therapy reported signi?cant improvements in bowel function compared with those only taking PR oral oxycodone, with no loss of analgesic ef?ciency. This outcome has been supported in a more recent review of litera- ture of clinical trials and observational studies into the evidence for PR oxycodone/naloxone treating moderate-to-severe pain and speci?c impact on opioid-induced (...) recommendations for best practice [V, B]. Physical assessment includes abdominal examination [auscul- tation, perineal inspection and digital rectal examination (DRE)] [V, B]. DRE is a safe and simple, diagnostic tool which may have particular bene?t in advanced disease [52]. Table 4 presents the rationale for basic physical assessment. If constipation is considered part of a spinal cord compression syndrome, full neurological examination is essential, including assessment of anal sphincter tone (lax

2018 European Society for Medical Oncology

55. Canadian Rheumatology Association recommendations for the assessment and monitoring of systemic lupus erythematosus

. General Assessment Recommendations Best clinical practice statement (general assessment). Best clinical practice dictates that all adult and pediatric patients with SLE have a complete history, physical, and laboratory evaluation at baseline and during each followup visit. Careful interpretation of the clinical and laboratory findings is required to ensure proper attribution of the signs, symptoms, and investigation results toward SLE or other comorbid conditions. Remarks: Best clinical practice (...) be used include the following: SLE Disease Activity Index-2K 5,29 , British Isles Lupus Assessment Group score 5,30 , SLE Activity Measure 5,31 , and others. Several factors influence the choice of a particular instrument including physician preference and expertise, cost, time burdens, and applicability to pediatric populations. All variables in each instrument are derived from a complete history and physical and laboratory examination, which is good clinical practice. Justification: The evidence

2018 CPG Infobase

56. International evidence-based guideline for the assessment and management of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

Chapter Two Prevalence, screening, diagnostic assessment and treatment of emotional wellbeing 57 2.1 Quality of life 58 2.2 Depressive and anxiety symptoms, screening and treatment 60 2.3 Psychosexual function 63 2.4 Body image 65 2.5 Eating disorders and disordered eating 67 2.6 Information resources, models of care, cultural and linguistic considerations 69 Chapter Three Lifestyle 72 3.1 Effectiveness of lifestyle interventions 73 3.2 Behavioural interventions 75 3.3 Dietary interventions 77 3.4 (...) specific stages. 1.2.9 CPP Where androgen levels are markedly above laboratory reference ranges, other causes of biochemical hyperandrogenism need to be considered. History of symptom onset and progression is critical in assessing for neoplasia, however, some androgen-secreting neoplasms may only induce mild to moderate increases in biochemical hyperandrogenism. 1.3 Clinical hyperandrogenism 1.3.1 CCR A comprehensive history and physical examination should be completed for symptoms and signs

2018 European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology

57. Recommendations from the international evidence-based guideline for the assessment and management of polycystic ovary syndrome

hyperandrogenismneedtobe considered. Historyofsymptomonsetandprogressionis criticalin assessing for neoplasia, however, some androgen-secreting neoplasms may only induce mild to moderate increases in biochemical hyperandrogenism. _ Clinicalhyperandrogenism CCR A comprehensive history and physical examination should be completed for symptoms and signs of clinical hyperandrogenism, including acne, alopecia, and hirsutism and, in adolescents, severe acne and hirsutism. **** CCR Health professionals should be aware (...) Recommendations from the international evidence-based guideline for the assessment and management of polycystic ovary syndrome Recommendations from the international evidence-based guideline for the assessment and management of polycystic ovary syndrome Helena J. Teede, M.B.B.S., Ph.D., FRACP, FAAHMS, a,b,c Marie L. Misso, Ph.D., B.Sc.(Hons.), a,b,c Michael F. Costello, M.B.B.S., M.Med.(RH&HG), FRANZCOG, C.R.E.I., D.Med.Sc., d Anuja Dokras, M.D., Ph.D., e Joop Laven, M.D., Ph.D., f Lisa Moran

2018 Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology

58. Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

of thresholds for interventions aimed at ameliorating nutritional deterioration ( ). A large portion of children admitted to PICU is at risk for nutritional deterioration; therefore, periodic nutritional re-evaluation is essential ( , ). Nutritional assessment must include a dietary history, detection of changes in anthropometry, functional status, and nutrition-focused physical examination. A nutrition-focused physical examination in this cohort allows for determination of individualized nutrient needs (...) Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Sup... : Pediatric Critical Care Medicine 1 mo and < 18 yr) critically ill patient expected to require a length of stay greater than 2 or 3 days in a PICU admitting medical, surgical, and cardiac patients. In total, 2,032 citations were

2017 Society of Critical Care Medicine

59. Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient

Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition - Mehta - 2017 - Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition - Wiley Online Library Search within Search term Search term The full text of this article hosted at iucr.org (...) is unavailable due to technical difficulties. Clinical Guideline Free Access Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Corresponding Author E-mail address: Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Nilesh M. Mehta

2017 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

60. Pediatric Obesity: Assessment, Treatment, and Prevention

recommend balancing unavoidable technology-related screen time in children and adolescents with increased opportunities for physical activity. (1|⊕⊕⚪⚪) 3.6 We suggest that a clinician’s obesity prevention efforts enlist the entire family rather than only the individual patient. (2|⊕⚪⚪⚪) 3.7 We suggest that clinicians assess family function and make appropriate referrals to address family stressors to decrease the development of obesity. (2|⊕⊕⚪⚪) 3.8 We suggest using school-based programs and community (...) Pediatric Obesity: Assessment, Treatment, and Prevention '); '); Pediatric Obesity Guideline Resources | Endocrine Society Hormone Science to Health / › › › Guidelines and Clinical Practice Section + Pediatric Obesity Guideline Resources Full Guideline: JCEM | January 2017 Dennis M. Styne (chair), Silva A. Arslanian, Ellen L. Connor, Ismaa Sadaf Farooqi, M. Hassan Murad, Janet H. Silverstein, and Jack A. Yanovski The Endocrine Society's 2017 guideline is an update of the previous version from

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2017 The Endocrine Society

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