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40 results for

"Q fever"

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1. Cross-sectional study of brucellosis and Q fever in Thailand among livestock in two districts at the Thai-Cambodian border, Sa Kaeo province Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cross-sectional study of brucellosis and Q fever in Thailand among livestock in two districts at the Thai-Cambodian border, Sa Kaeo province Brucellosis and Q fever impart high morbidity in humans and economic losses among livestock worldwide. However their prevalence is still not fully known in Thailand. We conducted a sero-survey of brucellosis and Q fever in beef, dairy cattle, goat, and sheep herds from Thai communities at the border with Cambodia, a cross-border trading center. Serum (...) samples were tested for brucellosis and Q fever by antibody-based tests at the National Institute of Animal Health, Thailand. We surveyed a total of 520 individuals from 143 herds. Brucellosis herd-level seroprevalence for beef cattle and small ruminants (goats and sheep) was 2.6% (3/117) and 13.3% (2/15) respectively. Q fever herd-level seroprevalence for beef cattle, dairy cattle, and small ruminants was 4.3% (5/117), 27.3% (3/11) and 33.3% (5/15) respectively. This study identified a significant

2018 One health

2. Q fever in an endemic region of North Queensland, Australia: A 10 year review Full Text available with Trip Pro

Q fever in an endemic region of North Queensland, Australia: A 10 year review Q fever is a zoonotic infection caused by Coxiella burnetii. Endemic Q fever has long been recognised in north Queensland, with north Queensland previously acknowledged to have the highest rate of notification in Australia. In this retrospective study, we reviewed the demographics and exposure of patients diagnosed with Q fever in an endemic region of north Queensland, to identify trends and exposure factors (...) for the acquisition of Q fever.A retrospective study looking at patients in the region that had tested positive for Q fever by case ascertainment between 2004 and 2014. This involved both a chart review and the completion of a patient questionnaire targeting demographics, clinical presentation, risk factors and outcomes.There were 101 patients with a positive Q fever serology and/or PCR that were identified in the region of north Queensland that was studied, between 2004 and 2014. The cohort was residents

2017 One health

3. Human Q fever incidence is associated to spatiotemporal environmental conditions Full Text available with Trip Pro

Human Q fever incidence is associated to spatiotemporal environmental conditions Airborne pathogenic transmission from sources to humans is characterised by atmospheric dispersion and influence of environmental conditions on deposition and reaerosolisation. We applied a One Health approach using human, veterinary and environmental data regarding the 2009 epidemic in The Netherlands, and investigated whether observed human Q fever incidence rates were correlated to environmental risk factors. We (...) concentration was the most important predictor variable (positively correlated to incidence rate), followed by vegetation density (negatively). The other variables were also important, but to a less extent. High erosion sensitive soils and the land-use fractions "city" and "forest" were positively correlated. Soil moisture and land-use "open nature" were negatively associated. The geographical prediction map identified the largest Q fever outbreak areas. The hazard map identified highest hazards

2016 One health

4. Q fever: risk of transmission via blood or other body material

Q fever: risk of transmission via blood or other body material Q fever: risk of transmission via blood or other body material Q fever: risk of transmission via blood or other body material Health Council of the Netherlands, Gezondheidsraad Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Health Council of the Netherlands, Gezondheidsraad. Q fever: risk (...) of transmission via blood or other body material. The Hague: Health Council of the Netherlands/Gezondheidsraad (GR). 2011/15E. 2011 Authors' conclusions At various points in this advisory report, the Committee notes there is a (relative) lack of data, not only on the potential transmission of Q fever via blood transfusion or body materials, but also regarding more basic questions. With regard to the latter, the Committee refers to the diagnosis and treatment of (primarily chronic) Q fever and the results

2011 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

5. Management of Tick Bites and Lyme Disease During Pregnancy

terms and keywords including Lyme Disease, Pregnancy, Pregnant Women, Pregnancy Complications, Ehrlichiosis, Anaplasmosis, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Babesiosis, Tularemia, Powassan Virus, Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne, Tick-Borne Diseases, Colorado Tick Fever, Q Fever, Relapsing Fever, and Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness. All articles on Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases with a target population of pregnant women were included; other groups and populations were excluded

2020 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

6. Lassa fever

that she has no competing interests. Consultant in Tropical and Travel Medicine Hospitals for Tropical Diseases Senior Lecturer London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine London UK Disclosures RB has provided expert testimony to the courts, on behalf of the Crown, regarding Q fever. RB has been a paid member of the Advisory Board for Takeda regarding Dengue vaccine. He has been a paid member of the Advisory Board for Valneva UK regarding Ixiaro, a vaccine for Japanese encephalitis. Peer reviewers

2019 BMJ Best Practice

7. Assessment of fever of unknown origin in adults

erythematosus Crohn's disease Ulcerative colitis Rheumatoid arthritis Reactive arthritis Drug-induced fever Cirrhosis, complicated Hepatitis Deep vein thrombosis Sarcoidosis Familial Mediterranean fever Malaria Typhoid fever Rocky Mountain spotted fever Ascariasis Tularaemia Brucellosis Psittacosis Q fever Phaeochromocytoma Hyperthyroidism Munchausen syndrome Contributors Authors Chairman Jamaica Hospital Medical Center Albert Einstein College of Medicine Family Medicine Residency Program Jamaica New York

2018 BMJ Best Practice

8. Atypical pneumonia

-grade fever, cough, and malaise. Constitutional symptoms often predominate over respiratory findings. Although in most cases presentation can be in the milder spectrum of community-acquired pneumonia, some cases, especially if caused by L pneumophila , may present as severe pneumonia, necessitating ICU admission. Other possible pathogens include Chlamydophila species, Legionella species, Coxiella burnetii (Q fever), and respiratory viruses. History and exam presence of risk factors age <50 years

2018 BMJ Best Practice

9. Coxiella burnetii infection

A zoonotic disease caused by the gram-negative, obligate, intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii . Marrie TJ, Raoult D. Coxiella burnetii. In Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R, eds. Principles and practice of infectious diseases. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Churchill Livingstone; 2005. Hartzell JD, Wood-Morris RN, Martinez LJ, et al. Q fever: epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Mayo Clin Proc. 2008 May;83(5):574-9. http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org/article/S0025-6196(11)60733-7/fulltext http (...) ://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18452690?tool=bestpractice.com Eldin C, Mélenotte C, Mediannikov O, et al. From Q fever to Coxiella burnetii infection: a paradigm change. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2017 Jan;30(1):115-90. http://cmr.asm.org/content/30/1/115.long http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27856520?tool=bestpractice.com Many species of mammals, birds, and ticks are reservoirs of the bacterium, and the disease is spread globally through close contact with wild or domestic animals, especially their products

2018 BMJ Best Practice

10. Assessment of fever of unknown origin in adults

erythematosus Crohn's disease Ulcerative colitis Rheumatoid arthritis Reactive arthritis Drug-induced fever Cirrhosis, complicated Hepatitis Deep vein thrombosis Sarcoidosis Familial Mediterranean fever Malaria Typhoid fever Rocky Mountain spotted fever Ascariasis Tularaemia Brucellosis Psittacosis Q fever Phaeochromocytoma Hyperthyroidism Munchausen syndrome Contributors Authors Chairman Jamaica Hospital Medical Center Albert Einstein College of Medicine Family Medicine Residency Program Jamaica New York

2018 BMJ Best Practice

11. Lassa fever

that she has no competing interests. Consultant in Tropical and Travel Medicine Hospitals for Tropical Diseases Senior Lecturer London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine London UK Disclosures RB has provided expert testimony to the courts, on behalf of the Crown, regarding Q fever. RB has been a paid member of the Advisory Board for Takeda regarding Dengue vaccine. He has been a paid member of the Advisory Board for Valneva UK regarding Ixiaro, a vaccine for Japanese encephalitis. Peer reviewers

2018 BMJ Best Practice

15. ASCIA Guidelines - vaccination of the egg allergic individual

or prolonged waiting times after administration are not required. • The yellow fever and Q fever vaccines potentially contain higher amounts of egg protein and allergy specialist evaluation is recommended before vaccination. Introduction Vaccination is an important method of reducing the risk of developing a number of infectious diseases. Before mass vaccination campaigns in Australia, measles was a significant contributor to hospitalization, morbidity (such as pneumonia, meningitis and encephalitis (...) Zealand vaccines is currently ~ 1ug or less/dose, substantially less than the estimated 130 ug egg protein taken orally considered likely to trigger reactions in egg allergic patients (8). Aims These guidelines aim to provide updated recommendations for vaccination of egg-allergic individuals, consistent with international and current Australian and New Zealand Guidelines (9-12). Since the MMR vaccine contains no egg protein and egg-containing vaccines such as the Yellow Fever and Q Fever

2017 Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

16. CRACKCast E076 – Pneumonia

— Histoplasma capsulatum Bird exposure — Chlamydophila psittaci, Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum Rabbit exposure — Francisella tularensis Exposure to farm animals or cats — Coxiella burnetti (Q fever) Post-influenza — S. pneumoniae, S. aureus Bronchiectasis, cystic fibrosis — Pseudomonas aeruginosa, S. pneumoniae, Burkholderia cepacia Sickle cell disease, asplenia — S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae Suspected bioterrorism — Anthrax / Tularemia Tropical Australia — melioidosis, Acinetobacter

2017 CandiEM

17. CRACKCast E134 – Tickborne Illnesses

Rickettsia rickettsii Dermacentor andersoni Dermacentor variabilis Predominantly southeastern United States Rhipicephalus sanguineus Arizona Q fever Coxiella burnetii Dermacentor andersoni Worldwide Human monocytic ehrlichiosis Ehrlichia chaffeensis Amblyomma americanum South central and southeastern United States Human granulocytic anaplasmosis Anaplasma phagocytophilum Ixodes scapularis New England and north central United States Ixodes pacificus Northern California Parasitic (protozoal) Babesiosis

2017 CandiEM

20. Establishing research priorities to improve the One Health efficacy of Australian general practitioners and veterinarians with regard to zoonoses: A modified Delphi survey Full Text available with Trip Pro

identified general knowledge of the clinical aspects and epidemiological aspects of zoonoses, as well as risk management practices, as the most important KAPs and research priorities for both GPs and veterinarians. In terms of diseases, the expert panel regarded knowledge of Hendra virus, Q fever, Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV), anthrax and Brucella suis most important for veterinarians, whilst for GPs, Q fever, gastrointestinal/foodborne diseases, influenza, ABLV and local vector-borne diseases were

2018 One health