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1. Cannabidiol in a pharmaceutical formulation (Epidiolex; GWP42003-P) for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in children and adults

Cannabidiol in a pharmaceutical formulation (Epidiolex; GWP42003-P) for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in children and adults Cannabidiol in a pharmaceutical formulation (Epidiolex; GWP42003-P) for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in children and adults | Innovation Observatory toggle menu Menu Search View All Filter by Speciality Filter by Year Filter by Category This search function provides links to outputs produced by NIHR Innovation Observatory. These are briefing notes or reports on new or repurposed (...) technologies. This search will not return all technologies currently in development as these outputs are produced as required for our stakeholders. > > > Cannabidiol in a pharmaceutical formulation (Epidiolex; GWP42003-P) for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in children and adults Cannabidiol in a pharmaceutical formulation (Epidiolex; GWP42003-P) for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in children and adults June 2017 A pharmaceutical formulation of the cannabis extract, cannabidiol is being developed for those patients who

2017 NIHR Innovation Observatory

2. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol/Cannabidiol for Spasticity in Multiple Sclerosis: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol/Cannabidiol for Spasticity in Multiple Sclerosis: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol/Cannabidiol for Spasticity in Multiple Sclerosis: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol/Cannabidiol for Spasticity in Multiple Sclerosis: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol/Cannabidiol for Spasticity in Multiple Sclerosis: Clinical Effectiveness (...) and Guidelines Published on: May 4, 2016 Project Number: RB0983-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary of Abstracts Result type: Report Question 1. What is the clinical effectiveness of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol for the treatment of spasticity in patients with Multiple Sclerosis? 2. What are the evidence-based guidelines associated with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol for the treatment of spasticity in patients with Multiple Sclerosis? Key Message Three systematic

2016 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

3. How does cannabidiol (CBD) influence the acute effects of delta-9- tetrahydrocannabinol (?9-THC) in humans? A systematic review

How does cannabidiol (CBD) influence the acute effects of delta-9- tetrahydrocannabinol (?9-THC) in humans? A systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any

2019 PROSPERO

4. Efficacy and safety of cannabidiol in the treatment of conflict-related post-traumatic syndrome disorder on humans compared to standard anti-stress drugs: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol

Efficacy and safety of cannabidiol in the treatment of conflict-related post-traumatic syndrome disorder on humans compared to standard anti-stress drugs: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears

2019 PROSPERO

5. Changes in delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (?9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) in cannabis

Changes in delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (?9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) in cannabis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email

2019 PROSPERO

6. Cannabidiol (CBD) for autism spectrum disorders: a systematic review

Cannabidiol (CBD) for autism spectrum disorders: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation

2019 PROSPERO

7. The therapeutic effects of cannabidiol for the treatment of crack cocaine dependence: a systematic review

The therapeutic effects of cannabidiol for the treatment of crack cocaine dependence: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files

2019 PROSPERO

8. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol (Sativex®)

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol (Sativex®) Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol (Sativex®) Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol (Sativex®) All Wales Medicines Strategy Group (AWMSG) Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation All Wales Medicines Strategy Group (AWMSG). Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol (Sativex®) Penarth: All Wales (...) Therapeutics and Toxicology Centre (AWTTC), secretariat of the All Wales Medicines Strategy Group (AWMSG). AWMSG Secretariat Assessment Report Advice No. 1814. 2014 Authors' conclusions Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol (Sativex®) is recommended as an option for use within NHS Wales as treatment for symptom improvement in adult patients with moderate to severe spasticity due to multiple sclerosis who have not responded adequately to other anti-spasticity medication and who demonstrate clinically

2015 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

9. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol - Cancer Pain (adjunctive analgesia to maximum tolerated strong opioids)

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol - Cancer Pain (adjunctive analgesia to maximum tolerated strong opioids) Common Drug Review CEDAC Meeting–January 23, 2008 Page 1 of 2 Notice of CEDAC Final Recommendation–February 20, 2008 CEDAC FINAL RECOMMENDATION and REASONS for RECOMMENDATION DELTA-9-TETRAHYDROCANNABINOL (THC)/CANNABIDIOL (Sativex ® Resubmission – Bayer Inc.) Description: Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)/cannabidiol is a cannabinoid extract. The Canadian Expert Drug Advisory (...) Committee (CEDAC) previously reviewed THC/cannabidiol for neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis (see CEDAC Final Recommendation on THC/cannabidiol, September 26, 2007). This resubmission was based on a Notice of Compliance with Conditions (NOC/c) from Health Canada stating that THC/cannabidiol may be useful as adjunctive analgesic treatment in adult patients with advanced cancer who experience moderate to severe pain during the highest tolerated dose of strong opioid therapy for persistent background

2008 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Common Drug Review

10. Simplified guideline for prescribing medical cannabinoids in primary care

medical cannabinoids, we recommend nabiximols (strong recommendation) — We recommend against medical marijuana (smoked, oils, or edibles), as it is inadequately studied (strong recommendation) — Clinicians could consider nabilone owing to its lower cost; however, it is off-label and lacks evidence for this use (weak recommendation) CBD—cannabidiol, CINV—chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, MS—multiple sclerosis, SCI—spinal cord injury, THC—tetrahydrocannabinol. *Reasonable therapeutic trial (...) ? • What is the efficacy of oral cannabinoids in chronic pain? • Is there high-level evidence that differing proportions of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or cannabidiol (CBD) influence effectiveness (or harms)? • How do cannabinoids compare to other drug treat- ments for neuropathic pain? All 7 questions were answered using an abbreviated, focused search and summation of the best available evi- dence. The results were discussed at meetings while finalizing and approving key recommendations. The principles

2018 CPG Infobase

11. Cannabis-based medicines for chronic neuropathic pain in adults. (PubMed)

participants. The studies were 2 to 26 weeks long and compared an oromucosal spray with a plant-derived combination of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) (10 studies), a synthetic cannabinoid mimicking THC (nabilone) (two studies), inhaled herbal cannabis (two studies) and plant-derived THC (dronabinol) (two studies) against placebo (15 studies) and an analgesic (dihydrocodeine) (one study). We used the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool to assess study quality. We defined studies with zero to two

2018 Cochrane

12. Cannabis for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. (PubMed)

(92 participants) met the inclusion criteria. One study (N = 60) compared 10 weeks of cannabidiol capsules with up to 4.7% D9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) with placebo capsules in participants with mild to moderate UC. The starting dose of cannabidiol was 50 mg twice daily increasing to 250 mg twice daily if tolerated. Another study (N = 32) compared 8 weeks of therapy with two cannabis cigarettes per day containing 0.5 g of cannabis, corresponding to 23 mg THC/day to placebo cigarettes (...) in participants with UC who did not respond to conventional medical treatment. No studies were identified that assessed cannabis therapy in quiescent UC. The first study was rated as low risk of bias and the second study (published as an abstract) was rated as high risk of bias for blinding of participants and personnel. The studies were not pooled due to differences in the interventional drug.The effect of cannabidiol capsules (100 mg to 500 mg daily) compared to placebo on clinical remission and response

2018 Cochrane

13. Cannabis for the treatment of Crohn's disease. (PubMed)

) compared cannabis oil (5% cannabidiol) to placebo oil in people with active CD. This study was rated as high risk of bias for other bias (cannabis participants were more likely than placebo participants to be smokers). There was no difference in clinical remission rates. Forty per cent (4/10) of cannabis oil participants achieved remission at 8 weeks compared to 33% (3/9) of the placebo participants (RR 1.20, 95% CI 0.36 to 3.97; very low certainty evidence). There was no difference in the proportion (...) of participants who had a serious adverse event. Ten per cent (1/10) of participants in the cannabis oil group had a serious adverse event compared to 11% (1/9) of placebo participants (RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.07 to 12.38, very low certainty evidence). Both serious AEs were worsening Crohn's disease that required rescue intervention. This study did not report on clinical response, CRP, quality of life or withdrawal due to AEs.One small study (N= 50) compared cannabis oil (15% cannabidiol and 4% THC) to placebo

2018 Cochrane

14. Adverse events

, but adverse events increase Published on 26 June 2018 doi: In people with some types of severe, drug-resistant epilepsy, adding cannabidiol (...) ; three trials, 306 participants). The likelihood of reducing seizure frequency by 50% or more was moderately increased (43.5% with cannabidiol vs 25.0% with placebo; RR 1.74, 95% CI 1.24 to 2.43; two trials, 291 participants). Parents or carers reported an improvement in their child’s overall quality of life (59.8% with cannabidiol vs 34.5% with placebo; RR (...) 1.73, 95% CI 1.33 to 2.26, two trials, 274 participants). Any adverse events (88.4% with cannabidiol vs 69.7% with placebo; RR 1.24, 95% CI 1.13 2019 5. Adverse events in people taking macrolide antibiotics versus placebo for any indication. BACKGROUND: Macrolide antibiotics (macrolides) are among the most commonly prescribed antibiotics worldwide and are used for a wide range of infections. However, macrolides also expose people to the risk of adverse events . The current understanding of adverse

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

15. Epilepsy

of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Soto N, Pichon-Riviere A, Augustovski F (...) , García Martí S, Alcaraz A, Bardach A, Ciapponi A, López A, Rey-Ares L. Cannabinoids for refractory epilepsy treatment. Buenos Aires: Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy (IECS). Informe de Respuesta Rapida No. 499. 2016 Authors' conclusions There is scarce and low quality evidence on cannabinoids (specifically cannabidiol) potential in reducing the frequency of seizures in patients (...) doi: In people with some types of severe, drug-resistant epilepsy , adding cannabidiol (...) to their treatment may reduce seizure frequency and improve quality of life compared with a placebo. The likelihood of being free from seizures for more than a year was still low, about 8%. However, serious adverse effects were 12% more likely with cannabidiol. These findings come from a systematic review, which included six trials in 555 patients. Most were children and adolescents with rare forms

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

16. Cannabis

, but adverse events increase Published on 26 June 2018 doi: In people with some types of severe, drug-resistant epilepsy, adding cannabidiol (...) and require an alternative. There has been widespread interest from the public and the media in the medical use of cannabis and its active components (called cannabinoids ). Some countries such as the Netherlands have legalised their use for medical purposes. Laboratory and animal studies have suggested that cannabinoids might reduce epileptic seizures (...) ), cannabidiol (CBD) et al., methods of administration (smoking, vaporisation, oral), and dosing recommendations. Adverse events of cannabis medicine pertain primarily to THC, whose total daily dose-equivalent should 2018 20. The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: A Review of Safety and Guidelines The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: A Review of Safety and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: A Review of Safety

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

17. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Regular Use and Cognitive Functioning

be consumed by smoking, vaporization, ingestion (edibles), oral application of tinctures, and by topical application of creams, oils and lotions. Cannabis consists of more than 100 cannabinoids, but delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive ingredient responsible for the “high” feeling. Cannabidiol (CBD), another important cannabinoid, does not have psychoactive properties, but may interact with THC. The acute effects of cannabis include euphoria and relaxation, changes in perception

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

18. Edible Cannabis, Cannabis Extracts and Cannabis Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products

found in cannabis that can affect your mind and body when consumed. THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, is a cannabinoid that makes an individual high, euphoric and intoxicated. CBD (cannabidiol) is a non-intoxicating cannabinoid that might have some therapeutic benefit, but more research is needed to confirm its potential medical use. Edible cannabis comes in a wide range of products. 1 Although some edible cannabis products might look like normal food items, they are not food; these products

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

19. 7 Things You Need to Know about Edible Cannabis

) is a cannabinoid that makes an individual euphoric and intoxicated (or high). CBD (cannabidiol) is a non-intoxicating cannabinoid that might have some therapeutic benefit, although more research is needed to confirm its potential medical use. There is a wide range of edible cannabis products. Although some edible cannabis products might look like normal food items, they are not food and are not intended to provide any nutritional value. Edible cannabis products provide an alternative method of cannabis

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

20. PEER Simplified Guideline: Medical Cannabinoids

no difference versus placebo, one found ~2kg improvement with cannabinoids versus placebo, and one found megesterol improved weight 8.5kg more than cannabinoids. 11 For seizure disorders, a Cochrane systematic review reported four low-quality RCTs with 9-15 patients each, and did not find that there was any reliable information to support cannabinoids for seizure prevention (Cannabinoid Prescribing Information 2018). Since then, a 2017 high-quality RCT of cannabidiol for treatment- resistant seizures (...) 16 of 26 References 16. Andreae MH, Carter GM, Shaparin N, Suslov K, Ellis RJ, Ware MA, Abrams DI, Prasad H, Wilsey B, Indyk D, Johnson M, Sacks HS. Inhaled cannabis for chronic neuropathic pain: a meta-analysis of individual patient data. J Pain 2015;16(12):1221-32. 17. Devinsky O, Cross JH, Laux L, Marsh E, Miller I, Nabbout R, et al. Trial of cannabidiol for drug- resistant seizures in the Dravet syndrome. N Engl J Med. 2017;376(21):2011-20. 18. Tarride JE, Collet JP, Choinere M, Rousseau C

2018 Toward Optimized Practice