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81. Randomised controlled trial: Topical antibiotic therapy is superior to systemic antibiotics

Randomised controlled trial: Topical antibiotic therapy is superior to systemic antibiotics Topical antibiotic therapy is superior to systemic antibiotics for acute tympanostomy tube otorrhoea, but may not be necessary for all children | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your (...) username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Topical antibiotic therapy is superior to systemic antibiotics for acute tympanostomy tube otorrhoea, but may not be necessary for all children Article

2014 Evidence-Based Medicine

82. Cohort study: Physician antibiotic prescriptions for skin infections in the outpatient setting are often unnecessarily long and include unnecessary antibiotics

Cohort study: Physician antibiotic prescriptions for skin infections in the outpatient setting are often unnecessarily long and include unnecessary antibiotics Physician antibiotic prescriptions for skin infections in the outpatient setting are often unnecessarily long and include unnecessary antibiotics | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn (...) more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Physician antibiotic prescriptions for skin infections in the outpatient setting

2014 Evidence-Based Medicine

83. Antibiotics and antiseptics for wounds: evidence and ignorance

randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effects of systemic and topical antibiotics, and topical antiseptics, on pressure ulcer healing in any clinical setting. They found 12 relevant trials with 576 participants, all assessing topical agents: povidone iodine, cadexomer iodine, gentian violet, lysozyme, silver dressings, honey, pine resin, polyhexanide, silver sulfadiazine, and nitrofurazone with ethoxy-diaminoacridine. They were compared with alternative antimicrobials or other ointments (...) (SWHSI) reaches similar conclusions to the pressure ulcer review. There is no robust evidence on the relative effectiveness of any antiseptic, antibiotic or antimicrobial for SWHSI. Barts nurses (date uncertain). Photo from the private collection of Peter Maleczek, with permission The review includes 8 RCTs with 886 participants, evaluating a range of comparisons and, once again, studies tended to be small and poorly reported. My eyes widened when I read that one study, from as recently as 2005

2016 Evidently Cochrane

84. ORBACTIV (oritavancin), antibiotic of the glycopeptide class

ORBACTIV (oritavancin), antibiotic of the glycopeptide class ORBACTIV SUMMARY CT14548

2016 Haute Autorite de sante

85. SIVEXTRO (tedizolid), antibiotic of the oxazolidinone class - non-serious infections of staphylococcal aetiology that are resistant to methicillin

SIVEXTRO (tedizolid), antibiotic of the oxazolidinone class - non-serious infections of staphylococcal aetiology that are resistant to methicillin SIVEXTRO SUMMARY CT14395

2016 Haute Autorite de sante

86. A Regimen of Postoperative Antibiotics and Chlorhexidine Rinses Can Increase The Success Rate of Implant Osseointegration Following Ridge Preservation

A Regimen of Postoperative Antibiotics and Chlorhexidine Rinses Can Increase The Success Rate of Implant Osseointegration Following Ridge Preservation UTCAT3080, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title A Regimen of Postoperative Antibiotics and Chlorhexidine Rinses Can Increase The Success Rate of Implant Osseointegration Following Ridge Preservation Clinical Question In patients undergoing implant placement (...) following ridge preservation, does the use of post operative antibiotics and chlorhexidine rinse increase the success rate of implant osseointegration compared to no antibiotic/chlorhexidine use? Clinical Bottom Line Both pre- and postoperative antibiotics and chlorhexidine use increase the success rate of implant osseointegration following bone graft placement. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence

2016 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

87. Concurrent probiotics reduce the risk of antibiotic induced diarrhea and clostridium difficile

Concurrent probiotics reduce the risk of antibiotic induced diarrhea and clostridium difficile UTCAT3058, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Concurrent probiotics reduce the risk of antibiotic induced diarrhea and clostridium difficile Clinical Question In adult patients taking antibiotics post-treatment, does taking probiotics as opposed to not taking probiotics help to prevent secondary infection (...) ? Clinical Bottom Line In adult patients taking post-op antibiotics, the concurrent use of probiotics reduced the incidence of both antibiotic-associated diarrhea and Clostridium difficile infection. This is supported by a systematic review of several randomized controlled trials in which the concurrent use of probiotics prevented antibiotic-associated diarrhea and Clostridium difficile infection. This treatment can be used by general dentists, and patients are likely to accept the treatment. Best

2016 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

88. MALDI-TOF for detection of antibiotic resistant bacteria

commercially available. HealthPACT does not support public investment in MALDI-TOF for the identification of antimicrobial resistance bacteria in clinical practice at this time. When the evidence base for this technology matures it would be identified for further assessment via normal horizon scanning activities. MALDI-TOF for detection of antibiotic resistant bacteria: Update December 2016 1 Technology, Company and Licensing Register ID WP206 Technology name MALDI-TOF for detection of antibiotic resistant (...) bacteria Patient indication Patients with suspected vancomycin-resistant enterococci Reason for assessment In 2014, a Technology Brief was completed to investigate the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) for the detection of antibiotic resistant bacteria. MALDI-TOF is already in use in Australia for its ability to rapidly and cheaply identify bacteria, but more recently, the technology has been used for identifying antimicrobial resistance

2016 COAG Health Council - Horizon Scanning Technology Briefs

89. Systematic review: Antibiotics administered for acute otitis media have modest benefits and adverse effects

Systematic review: Antibiotics administered for acute otitis media have modest benefits and adverse effects Antibiotics administered for acute otitis media have modest benefits and adverse effects | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts (...) OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Antibiotics administered for acute otitis media have modest benefits and adverse effects Article Text Therapeutics/Prevention Systematic review Antibiotics administered for acute otitis media have

2016 Evidence-Based Medicine

90. Randomised controlled trial: Antibiotics of no benefit to children with eczema and features of cutaneous infection but controversy remains unresolved

Randomised controlled trial: Antibiotics of no benefit to children with eczema and features of cutaneous infection but controversy remains unresolved Antibiotics of no benefit to children with eczema and features of cutaneous infection but controversy remains unresolved | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies (...) , please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Antibiotics of no benefit to children with eczema and features of cutaneous infection but controversy remains

2016 Evidence-Based Medicine

91. Global action plan on antimicrobial resistance: options for establishing a global development and stewardship framework to support the development, control, distribution and appropriate use of new antimicrobial medicines, diagnostic tools, vaccines and ot

Global action plan on antimicrobial resistance: options for establishing a global development and stewardship framework to support the development, control, distribution and appropriate use of new antimicrobial medicines, diagnostic tools, vaccines and ot Global action plan on antimicrobial resistance: options for establishing a global development and stewardship framework to support the development, control, distribution and appropriate use of new antimicrobial medicines, diagnostic tools (...) , vaccines and other interventions: report by the Secretariat JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Toggle navigation Toggle navigation Search Browse Statistics Related Links Global action plan on antimicrobial resistance: options for establishing a global development and stewardship framework to support the development, control, distribution and appropriate use of new antimicrobial medicines, diagnostic tools, vaccines and other interventions

2016 WHO

92. Glue ear: will antibiotics help your child?

Glue ear: will antibiotics help your child? Glue ear: will antibiotics help your child? - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By August 5, 2016 // In this guest blog, Professor Martin Burton talks about ‘glue ear’ and looks at the latest evidence that might help parents and their doctors to decide whether antibiotics are worth trying. ‘Glue ear’ (otherwise known as otitis media with effusion) is very common. Almost all children experience it at some point in childhood, but the consequences (...) – in a significant proportion of children. This is why so-called ‘active monitoring’ or ‘watchful waiting’ may be the best approach. A recent that I helped prepare, looked at the role of antibiotics in helping children with glue ear. The review found evidence of both benefits and harms associated with the use of antibiotics. On the one hand, it seems that a course of oral antibiotics increases the chance of complete resolution of otitis media with effusion. If you have a group of 200 children with glue ear

2016 Evidently Cochrane

93. Cefuroxime (Aprokam) - antibiotic prophylaxis of postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery

Cefuroxime (Aprokam) - antibiotic prophylaxis of postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery Published 12 December 2016 Product Update: cefuroxime 50mg powder for solution for injection (Aprokam ® ) SMC No (932/13) Thea Pharmaceuticals Ltd 04 November 2016 The Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) has completed its assessment of the above product and advises NHS Boards and Area Drug and Therapeutic Committees (ADTCs) on its use in NHS Scotland. The advice is summarised as follows: ADVICE (...) : following an abbreviated submission cefuroxime (Aprokam ® ) is accepted for use within NHS Scotland. Indication under review: antibiotic prophylaxis of postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Cefuroxime (Aprokam ® ) provides a licensed preparation and enables the off-label intracameral use of cefuroxime in cataract surgery to be avoided. Advice context: No part of this advice may be used without the whole of the advice being quoted in full. This advice represents the view of the Scottish

2016 Scottish Medicines Consortium

94. Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis

Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing (...) boards Evidence Education * Associated Topics Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis Shukan Kanuga, DDS, MSD . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Three to 6 days of short-term late-generation antibiotics have comparable treatment efficacy as a 10-day course of oral penicillin in children with acute group A β-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS) pharyngitis. Critical Summary Assessment On the basis of good

2015 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

95. Systematic review with meta analysis: The evidence for treating acute pyelonephritis with oral antibiotic therapy and short intravenous treatment is growing for low-risk children

Systematic review with meta analysis: The evidence for treating acute pyelonephritis with oral antibiotic therapy and short intravenous treatment is growing for low-risk children The evidence for treating acute pyelonephritis with oral antibiotic therapy and short intravenous treatment is growing for low-risk children | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any (...) time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here The evidence for treating acute pyelonephritis with oral antibiotic

2015 Evidence-Based Medicine

96. Prophylactic Antibiotics for Individuals With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

There are many classes of antibiotics, including beta-lactams (e.g., penicillin), tetracyclines (e.g., doxycycline), quinolones (e.g., moxifloxacin), and macrolides (e.g., azithromycin [AZM]). (3) The latter type have demonstrated antimicrobial effectiveness for the treatment of respiratory infections, (4) and also exert immunoregulatory actions that restrict the destruction of lung tissue by key immune-system cells. (2) Macrolide maintenance therapy became standard care for patients with diffuse (...) Prophylactic Antibiotics for Individuals With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Prophylactic Antibiotics for Individuals With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): A Rapid Review. February 2015; pp. 1–26 Prophylactic Antibiotics for Individuals With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): A Rapid Review Health Quality Ontario February 2015 Evidence Development and Standards Branch at Health Quality Ontario Prophylactic Antibiotics for Individuals With Chronic Obstructive

2014 Health Quality Ontario

97. Sharing decisions about antibiotics

Sharing decisions about antibiotics Sharing decisions about antibiotics - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By November 16, 2015 // It’s , which aims highlight the problem of antibiotic resistance and encourage best practice in antibiotic use. Last week, a new was published which found that helping doctors and patients decide together about using antibiotics to treat some respiratory infections probably results in fewer being prescribed. In this guest blog, retired GP Richard Lehman explains (...) why this is a good thing. It’s that time of year again. Most of us “come down” with something during the winter months. This is my first winter after complete retirement from general practice, so I can fall ill at leisure. I don’t have to worry about seeing endless worried parents of children with earache or croup, or adults whose cough has gone on for two weeks. Many of them come expecting antibiotics, and in the hurly burly of a busy surgery around Christmas, the temptation is to go ahead

2015 Evidently Cochrane

98. Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis

Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing (...) boards Evidence Education * Associated Topics Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis Shukan Kanuga, DDS, MSD . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Three to 6 days of short-term late-generation antibiotics have comparable treatment efficacy as a 10-day course of oral penicillin in children with acute group A β-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS) pharyngitis. Critical Summary Assessment On the basis of good

2015 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

99. Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis

Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing (...) boards Evidence Education * Associated Topics Short-term oral antibiotics may be as effective as the standard course of penicillin for children with acute streptococcal pharyngitis Shukan Kanuga, DDS, MSD . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Three to 6 days of short-term late-generation antibiotics have comparable treatment efficacy as a 10-day course of oral penicillin in children with acute group A β-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS) pharyngitis. Critical Summary Assessment On the basis of good

2015 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

100. Prophylactic Antibiotics in Anterior Nasal Packing for Epistaxis

Prophylactic Antibiotics in Anterior Nasal Packing for Epistaxis Emergency Medicine > Journal Club > Archive > May 2014 Toggle navigation May 2014 Prophylactic Antibiotics in Anterior Nasal Packing for Epistaxis Vignette You are working in your community emergency department (ED) one winter afternoon when you encounter Mr. D. He is a 64 year old gentleman with a history of hypertension, who takes amlodipine and a daily 81 mg aspirin. He presents with one hour of continuous right-­sided (...) brisk to allow for cautery. You bite the bullet and grab a 5.5 cm Rapid-­‐rhino and insert this in the right nare. After inflating the balloon, you Lind that you have achieved good hemostasis. You call your on-‐call ENT to arrange a follow-­‐up appointment in the next 2-­‐3 days for removal of the Rapid-­rhino and further assessment of the epistaxis. The ENT agrees to see the patient, and at the end of the call reminds you to send the patient home on oral antibiotics until follow­‐up. You send

2014 Washington University Emergency Medicine Journal Club

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