Latest & greatest articles for metformin

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Top results for metformin

1. Association Between Metformin Use and Risk of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Population-Based Cohort Study

Association Between Metformin Use and Risk of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Population-Based Cohort Study Association Between Metformin Use and Risk of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Population-Based Cohort Study - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Welcome to the new PubMed. For legacy PubMed go to . Clipboard, Search History, and several other advanced features are temporarily unavailable (...) your collection due to an error Add Cancel Add to My Bibliography My Bibliography Unable to load your delegates due to an error Add Cancel Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation Am J Gastroenterol Actions , 115 (1), 73-78 Jan 2020 Association Between Metformin Use and Risk of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Population-Based Cohort Study , , , , Affiliations Expand Affiliations 1 Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet

2020 EvidenceUpdates

2. Vascular and metabolic effects of metformin added to insulin therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Vascular and metabolic effects of metformin added to insulin therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration

2020 PROSPERO

3. Effect of metformin on serum anti-Müllerian hormone levels in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Effect of metformin on serum anti-Müllerian hormone levels in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration

2020 PROSPERO

4. Efficacy, Safety, and Tolerability of Oral Semaglutide Versus Placebo Added to Insulin With or Without Metformin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: The PIONEER 8 Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Efficacy, Safety, and Tolerability of Oral Semaglutide Versus Placebo Added to Insulin With or Without Metformin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: The PIONEER 8 Trial To investigate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of oral semaglutide added to insulin with or without metformin.Patients with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled on insulin with or without metformin were randomized to oral semaglutide 3 mg (N = 184), 7 mg (N = 182), or 14 mg (N = 181) or to placebo (N = 184) in a 52-week, double (...) . 7.1% with placebo; mostly mild to moderate).Oral semaglutide was superior to placebo in reducing HbA1c and body weight when added to insulin with or without metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes. The safety profile was consistent with other glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists.© 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.

2019 EvidenceUpdates

5. Oral Semaglutide Versus Empagliflozin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Uncontrolled on Metformin: The PIONEER 2 Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Oral Semaglutide Versus Empagliflozin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Uncontrolled on Metformin: The PIONEER 2 Trial Efficacy and safety of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analog oral semaglutide and the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor empagliflozin were compared in patients with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled on metformin.Patients were randomized to once-daily open-label treatment with oral semaglutide 14 mg (n = 412) or empagliflozin 25 mg (n = 410) in a 52-week trial. Key end (...) at week 26 (treatment policy), but oral semaglutide was significantly better than empagliflozin at week 52 (trial product -4.7 vs. -3.8 kg; P = 0.0114). Gastrointestinal adverse events were more common with oral semaglutide.Oral semaglutide was superior to empagliflozin in reducing HbA1c but not body weight at 26 weeks in patients with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled on metformin. At week 52, HbA1c and body weight (trial product estimand) were significantly reduced versus empagliflozin. Oral semaglutide

2019 EvidenceUpdates

6. Metformin hydrochloride / saxagliptin / dapagliflozin (Qtrilmet) - type 2 diabetes

Metformin hydrochloride / saxagliptin / dapagliflozin (Qtrilmet) - type 2 diabetes Official address Domenico Scarlattilaan 6 ? 1083 HS Amsterdam ? The Netherlands An agency of the European Union Address for visits and deliveries Refer to www.ema.europa.eu/how-to-find-us Send us a question Go to www.ema.europa.eu/contact Telephone +31 (0)88 781 6000 © European Medicines Agency, 2019. Reproduction is authorised provided the source is acknowledged. EMA/521799/2019 EMEA/H/C/004910 Qtrilmet (...) (metformin / saxagliptin / dapagliflozin) An overview of Qtrilmet and why it is authorised in the EU What is Qtrilmet and what is it used for? Qtrilmet is a diabetes medicine that contains the active substances metformin, saxagliptin and dapagliflozin. It is used to treat type 2 diabetes in: • adults whose blood sugar is not controlled well enough with metformin combined with either saxagliptin or dapagliflozin (including those also taking a sulphonylurea, another type of diabetes medicine); • adults who

2019 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

7. Efficacy and safety of once-weekly semaglutide versus daily canagliflozin as add-on to metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes (SUSTAIN 8): a double-blind, phase 3b, randomised controlled trial (Abstract)

Efficacy and safety of once-weekly semaglutide versus daily canagliflozin as add-on to metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes (SUSTAIN 8): a double-blind, phase 3b, randomised controlled trial Existing guidelines for management of type 2 diabetes recommend a patient-centred approach to guide the choice of pharmacological agents. Although glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists and sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are increasingly used as second-line agents, direct (...) comparisons between these treatments are insufficient. In the SUSTAIN 8 trial, we compared the efficacy and safety of semaglutide (a GLP-1 receptor agonist) with canagliflozin (an SGLT2 inhibitor) in patients with type 2 diabetes.This was a double-blind, parallel-group, phase 3b, randomised controlled trial done at 111 centres in 11 countries. Eligible patients were at least 18 years old and had uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (HbA1c 7·0-10·5% [53-91 mmol/mol]) on stable daily metformin therapy. Patients

2019 EvidenceUpdates

8. Systematic literature review and network meta-analysis of sodium-glucose co-transporter inhibitors vs metformin as add-on to insulin in type 1 diabetes (Abstract)

Systematic literature review and network meta-analysis of sodium-glucose co-transporter inhibitors vs metformin as add-on to insulin in type 1 diabetes To identify and synthesize phase 3 and phase 4 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of sodium-glucose co-transporter (SGLT) inhibitors and metformin as adjuncts to insulin in type 1 diabetes (T1DM) using network meta-analysis (NMA).A systematic literature review (SLR) identified relevant RCTs of ≥12 Weeks duration. MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane (...) Library and grey literature were searched through October 2018. NMAs indirectly compared SGLT inhibitors and metformin for change from baseline in HbA1c, weight, total daily insulin dose and systolic blood pressure at Week 24 to 26 and Week 52. Safety outcomes were also explored.Nine trials (N = 6780) were included in the SLR. NMAs indicated that all therapies performed better than placebo for the efficacy outcomes at both time points. Compared with metformin at Week 24 to 26, the SGLT inhibitors

2019 EvidenceUpdates

9. Inpatient diabetes: is there a role for metformin?

Inpatient diabetes: is there a role for metformin? Inpatient Diabetes: Is There a Role for Metformin? – Clinical Correlations Search Inpatient Diabetes: Is There a Role for Metformin? October 10, 2019 6 min read By Jamie Oliver Peer Reviewed “Hold metformin, start sliding-scale insulin, diabetic diet, subcutaneous heparin.” Just 10 words. For almost all admitted type 2 diabetics receiving metformin, this 10-word phrase is automatic. I am sure many medical students before me have asked, “Why (...) hold the metformin?” – especially if it has been well-tolerated and effective. Why give insulin to type 2 diabetics who have never needed it in the past? Metformin does have an associated risk of lactic acidosis, as well as a few frequently cited contraindications, [1]. However, many diabetic inpatients with none of these contraindications have their metformin held anyway. I turned to the interns and resident on our team for an alternate explanation, but unfortunately their responses were more

2019 Clinical Correlations

10. The Effects of Berberine vs. Metformin for Decreasing Waist Circumference and Serum Lipid Levels in Women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

The Effects of Berberine vs. Metformin for Decreasing Waist Circumference and Serum Lipid Levels in Women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome "The Effects of Berberine vs. Metformin for Decreasing Waist Circumfere" by Megan Pattee < > > > > > Title Author Date of Graduation Summer 8-10-2019 Degree Type Capstone Project Degree Name Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies Rights . Abstract Background: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a highly prevalent disease that effects both (...) metabolic and reproductive systems in women. PCOS is associated with a high incidence of obesity, insulin resistance, hyperandrogenism, hyperlipidemia, menstrual cycle dysfunction, and infertility. Diagnosis is made using the Rotterdam Criteria, and current accepted medical management of PCOS includes lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise, oral contraceptive pills (OCP), metformin (MET), and bariatric surgery. a. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the effect of berberine on waist

2019 Pacific University EBM Capstone Project

11. Association of Treatment With Metformin vs Sulfonylurea With Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events Among Patients With Diabetes and Reduced Kidney Function. (Abstract)

Association of Treatment With Metformin vs Sulfonylurea With Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events Among Patients With Diabetes and Reduced Kidney Function. Before 2016, safety concerns limited metformin use in patients with kidney disease; however, the effectiveness of metformin on clinical outcomes in patients with reduced kidney function remains unknown.To compare major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) among patients with diabetes and reduced kidney function who continued treatment (...) with metformin or a sulfonylurea.Retrospective cohort study of US veterans receiving care within the national Veterans Health Administration, with data supplemented by linkage to Medicare, Medicaid, and National Death Index data from 2001 through 2016. There were 174 882 persistent new users of metformin and sulfonylureas who reached a reduced kidney function threshold (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or creatinine ≥1.4 mg/dL for women or ≥1.5 mg/dL for men). Patients were followed up

2019 JAMA

12. Glycaemic durability of an early combination therapy with vildagliptin and metformin versus sequential metformin monotherapy in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (VERIFY): a 5-year, multicentre, randomised, double-blind trial. (Abstract)

Glycaemic durability of an early combination therapy with vildagliptin and metformin versus sequential metformin monotherapy in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (VERIFY): a 5-year, multicentre, randomised, double-blind trial. Early treatment intensification leading to sustained good glycaemic control is essential to delay diabetic complications. Although initial combination therapy has been suggested to offer more opportunities than a traditional stepwise approach, its validity remains (...) to be determined.Vildagliptin Efficacy in combination with metfoRmIn For earlY treatment of type 2 diabetes (VERIFY) was a randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study of newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes conducted in 254 centres across 34 countries. The study consisted of a 2-week screening visit, a 3-week metformin-alone run-in period, and a 5-year treatment period, which was further split into study periods 1, 2, and 3. Patients aged 18-70 years were included if they had type 2 diabetes diagnosed within 2

2019 Lancet

13. Neonatal, infant, and childhood growth following metformin versus insulin treatment for gestational diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis Full Text available with Trip Pro

Neonatal, infant, and childhood growth following metformin versus insulin treatment for gestational diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis Metformin is increasingly offered as an acceptable and economic alternative to insulin for treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in many countries. However, the impact of maternal metformin treatment on the trajectory of fetal, infant, and childhood growth is unknown.PubMed, Ovid Embase, Medline, Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov (...) , and the Cochrane database were systematically searched (from database inception to 26 February 2019). Outcomes of GDM-affected pregnancies randomised to treatment with metformin versus insulin were included (randomised controlled trials and prospective randomised controlled studies) from cohorts including European, American, Asian, Australian, and African women. Studies including pregnant women with pre-existing diabetes or non-diabetic women were excluded, as were trials comparing metformin treatment

2019 EvidenceUpdates

14. A 24-week, randomized, double-blind, active-controlled clinical trial comparing bexagliflozin with sitagliptin as an adjunct to metformin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in adults (Abstract)

A 24-week, randomized, double-blind, active-controlled clinical trial comparing bexagliflozin with sitagliptin as an adjunct to metformin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in adults To compare the relative safety and effectiveness of bexagliflozin and sitagliptin as adjuncts to metformin for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes.Participants (n = 386) were randomized to receive bexagliflozin (20 mg) or sitagliptin (100 mg) in addition to their existing doses of metformin. The primary

2019 EvidenceUpdates

15. Triple therapy with low-dose dapagliflozin plus saxagliptin versus dual therapy with each monocomponent, all added to metformin, in uncontrolled type 2 diabetes Full Text available with Trip Pro

Triple therapy with low-dose dapagliflozin plus saxagliptin versus dual therapy with each monocomponent, all added to metformin, in uncontrolled type 2 diabetes To evaluate the efficacy and safety of triple therapy with low-dose dapagliflozin plus saxagliptin added to metformin in uncontrolled type 2 diabetes.This 24-week, double-blind trial (NCT02681094) randomized 883 patients (glycated haemoglobin [HbA1c] 7.5-10.0%) on metformin ≥1500 mg/d to add-on dapagliflozin 5 mg/d plus saxagliptin 5 mg (...) = .0018]). Triple therapy significantly decreased fasting plasma glucose (-1.5 mmol/L vs. -1.1 mmol/L [dapagliflozin; P = .0135] vs. -0.7 mmol/L [saxagliptin; P < .0001]) and body weight (-2.0 kg vs. -0.4 kg [saxagliptin; P < .0001]), and β-hydroxybutyrate levels were lower than with dapagliflozin plus metformin (mean difference -0.51; P = .0009). Urinary tract/genital infections and hypoglycaemia occurred in <5.0% and 5.8% of patients, respectively, with triple therapy.Triple therapy with once-daily

2019 EvidenceUpdates

16. Dapagliflozin Plus Saxagliptin Add-on Therapy Compared With Insulin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Poorly Controlled by Metformin With or Without Sulfonylurea Therapy: A Randomized Clinical Trial (Abstract)

Dapagliflozin Plus Saxagliptin Add-on Therapy Compared With Insulin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Poorly Controlled by Metformin With or Without Sulfonylurea Therapy: A Randomized Clinical Trial This study evaluated whether an oral combination of a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor and a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor achieved glycemic control similar to basal insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes, poorly controlled with metformin, without increasing hypoglycemia or body (...) weight.In a multinational, open-label, randomized, phase 3 trial (ClinicalTrials.gov reg. no. NCT02551874), adults with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on metformin, with or without sulfonylurea, were randomized (1:1) to receive dapagliflozin (DAPA) plus saxagliptin (SAXA) or titrated insulin glargine (INS). The primary end point was change in glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) from baseline to week 24. DAPA + SAXA treatment was tested for noninferiority versus INS.The efficacy data set included

2019 EvidenceUpdates

17. Comparing the effects of ipragliflozin versus metformin on visceral fat reduction and metabolic dysfunction in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes treated with sitagliptin: A prospective, multicentre, open-label, blinded-endpoint, randomized controlled Full Text available with Trip Pro

Comparing the effects of ipragliflozin versus metformin on visceral fat reduction and metabolic dysfunction in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes treated with sitagliptin: A prospective, multicentre, open-label, blinded-endpoint, randomized controlled A prospective, multicentre, open-label, blinded-endpoint, randomized controlled study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of treatment with ipragliflozin (sodium-dependent glucose transporter-2 inhibitor) versus metformin for visceral fat (...) reduction and glycaemic control among Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes treated with sitagliptin, HbA1c levels of 7%-10%, and body mass index (BMI) ≥ 22 kg/m2 . Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive ipragliflozin 50 mg or metformin 1000-1500 mg daily. The primary outcome was change in visceral fat area as measured by computed tomography after 24 weeks of therapy. The secondary outcomes were effects on glucose metabolism and lipid metabolism. Mean percentage reduction in visceral fat area

2019 EvidenceUpdates

18. Ertugliflozin with metformin and a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor for treating type 2 diabetes

Ertugliflozin with metformin and a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor for treating type 2 diabetes Ertugliflozin with metformin and a Ertugliflozin with metformin and a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor for dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor for treating type 2 diabetes treating type 2 diabetes T echnology appraisal guidance Published: 5 June 2019 www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ta583 © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice (...) to eliminate unlawful discrimination, to advance equality of opportunity and to reduce health inequalities. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Ertugliflozin with metformin and a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor for treating type 2 diabetes (TA583) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Technology Appraisals

19. A randomized controlled trial of metformin on left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with coronary artery disease without diabetes: the MET-REMODEL trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

A randomized controlled trial of metformin on left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with coronary artery disease without diabetes: the MET-REMODEL trial We tested the hypothesis that metformin may regress left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in patients who have coronary artery disease (CAD), with insulin resistance (IR) and/or pre-diabetes.We randomly assigned 68 patients (mean age 65 ± 8 years) without diabetes who have CAD with IR and/or pre-diabetes to receive either metformin XL (2000 mg (...) daily dose) or placebo for 12 months. Primary endpoint was change in left ventricular mass indexed to height1.7 (LVMI), assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. In the modified intention-to-treat analysis (n = 63), metformin treatment significantly reduced LVMI compared with placebo group (absolute mean difference -1.37 (95% confidence interval: -2.63 to -0.12, P = 0.033). Metformin also significantly reduced other secondary study endpoints such as: LVM (P = 0.032), body weight (P = 0.001

2019 EvidenceUpdates

20. Metformin prescription and aortic aneurysm: systematic review and meta-analysis (Abstract)

Metformin prescription and aortic aneurysm: systematic review and meta-analysis To assess the association of metformin prescription with the risk of aortic aneurysm, aortic aneurysm events and the enlargement of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA).Systematic review and meta-analysis.We searched PubMed, Embase and Scopus for epidemiological studies up to November 2018. We included observational studies which evaluated the association of metformin prescription with the risk of aortic aneurysm disease (...) , and we also included studies involving progression and enlargement of AAA. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to assess the quality of included studies. Random-effect meta-analyses were conducted in line with the between-study heterogeneity. Sensitivity analyses were performed to identify the source of heterogeneity.Eight studies enrolling 29 587 participants met the inclusion criteria and were included in this systematic review. We found that metformin prescription could significantly limit

2019 EvidenceUpdates