Latest & greatest articles for ace inhibitors

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on ace inhibitors and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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ACE inhibitors

Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE) are principally used to reduce blood pressure. ACE inhibitors work by reducing the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. They have been used in a variety of conditions, including hypertension, acute myocardial infarctions, left ventricular systolic dysfunction and diabetic nephropathy

Ace inhibitors can be used alone to treat hypertension, or they can be used in combination with other drugs such as diuretics. Case studies and clinical trials on the medicine show that it can be used to prevent stroke or heart attacks. Common side effects of the drug including hypotension, dry cough, hyperkalaemia, headache, dizziness, fatigue, nausea, renal impairment and swelling in the lips and tongue.

ACE Inhibitors are widely used and feature extensively in the literature including clinical guidelines, systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials, case studies etc. These can easily be found via a search of the Trip Database. Medical research is vital to the development of new treatments and therapies for hypertension.

Top results for ace inhibitors

1. ACE inhibitors and ARBs: One or the other -- not both -- for high-risk patients

ACE inhibitors and ARBs: One or the other -- not both -- for high-risk patients ACE inhibitors and ARBs: One or the other -- not both -- for high-risk patients Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics ACE inhibitors and ARBs: One or the other -- not both -- for high-risk patients View/ Open Date 2009-01 Format (...) Metadata Abstract Avoid prescribing an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor and an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) for patients at high risk of vascular events or renal dysfunction. The combination does not reduce poor outcomes, and leads to more adverse drug-related events than an ACE inhibitor or ARB alone. Stength of recommendation: B: 1 large, high-quality randomized controlled trial (RCT). URI Part of Citation Journal of Family Practice, 58(1) 2009: 24+. Rights OpenAccess. This work

2019 PURLS

2. ACE inhibitors and ARBs: One or the other -- not both -- for high-risk patients

ACE inhibitors and ARBs: One or the other -- not both -- for high-risk patients ACE inhibitors and ARBs: One or the other -- not both -- for high-risk patients Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics ACE inhibitors and ARBs: One or the other -- not both -- for high-risk patients View/ Open Date 2009-01 Format (...) Metadata Abstract Avoid prescribing an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor and an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) for patients at high risk of vascular events or renal dysfunction. The combination does not reduce poor outcomes, and leads to more adverse drug-related events than an ACE inhibitor or ARB alone. Stength of recommendation: B: 1 large, high-quality randomized controlled trial (RCT). URI Part of Citation Journal of Family Practice, 58(1) 2009: 24+. Rights OpenAccess. This work

2019 PURLS

3. In adults with heart valve disease without concomitant heart failure, what is the clinical and cost effectiveness of alpha-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers (ARBs), beta blockers, calcium channel bl

In adults with heart valve disease without concomitant heart failure, what is the clinical and cost effectiveness of alpha-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers (ARBs), beta blockers, calcium channel bl Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied

2019 PROSPERO

4. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) for diabetic kidney disease: a Bayesian network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) for diabetic kidney disease: a Bayesian network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility

2019 PROSPERO

5. ACE inhibitors and beta-blockers as risk factors for systemic reactions to venom immunotherapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

ACE inhibitors and beta-blockers as risk factors for systemic reactions to venom immunotherapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record

2019 PROSPERO

6. ACE inhibitors

ACE inhibitors Top results for ace inhibitors - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Turning Research Into Practice ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 (...) or #2) and (#3 or #4) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for ace inhibitors The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

7. Do ACE inhibitors or ARBs help prevent kidney disease in patients with diabetes and normal BP?

Do ACE inhibitors or ARBs help prevent kidney disease in patients with diabetes and normal BP? Do ACE inhibitors or ARBs help prevent kidney disease in patients with diabetes and normal BP? Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics Do ACE inhibitors or ARBs help prevent kidney disease in patients with diabetes (...) and normal BP? View/ Open Date 2017-04 Format Metadata Abstract Q: Do ACE inhibitors or ARBs help prevent kidney disease in patients with diabetes and normal BP? Evidence-based answer: Yes for angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, no for angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). In normotensive patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, ACE inhibitor therapy reduces the risk of developing diabetic kidney disease, defined as new-onset microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria, by 18% (strength

2018 Clinical Inquiries

8. Clinical benefits and risks of ACE inhibitors for treatment of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction

Clinical benefits and risks of ACE inhibitors for treatment of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation

2018 PROSPERO

9. What is the impact of genetic polymorphisms on ACE inhibitor-induced coughs in patients with hypertension?

What is the impact of genetic polymorphisms on ACE inhibitor-induced coughs in patients with hypertension? Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation

2018 PROSPERO

10. ACE Inhibitors and Statins in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes. Full Text available with Trip Pro

ACE Inhibitors and Statins in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes. Among adolescents with type 1 diabetes, rapid increases in albumin excretion during puberty precede the development of microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria, long-term risk factors for renal and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that adolescents with high levels of albumin excretion might benefit from angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and statins, drugs that have not been fully evaluated in adolescents.We (...) screened 4407 adolescents with type 1 diabetes between the ages of 10 and 16 years of age and identified 1287 with values in the upper third of the albumin-to-creatinine ratios; 443 were randomly assigned in a placebo-controlled trial of an ACE inhibitor and a statin with the use of a 2-by-2 factorial design minimizing differences in baseline characteristics such as age, sex, and duration of diabetes. The primary outcome for both interventions was the change in albumin excretion, assessed according

2017 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

11. Associations of centrally acting ACE inhibitors with cognitive decline and survival in Alzheimer’s disease Full Text available with Trip Pro

Associations of centrally acting ACE inhibitors with cognitive decline and survival in Alzheimer’s disease Cognitive improvement has been reported in patients receiving centrally acting angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (C-ACEIs).To compare cognitive decline and survival after diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease between people receiving C-ACEIs, non-centrally acting angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (NC-ACEIs), and neither.Routine Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores were (...) extracted in 5260 patients receiving acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and analysed against C-/NC-ACEI exposure at the time of Alzheimer's disease diagnosis.In the 9 months after Alzheimer's disease diagnosis, MMSE scores significantly increased by 0.72 and 0.19 points per year in patients on C-ACEIs and neither respectively, but deteriorated by 0.61 points per year in those on NC-ACEIs. There were no significant group differences in score trajectories from 9 to 36 months and no differences in survival.In

2017 BJPsych open

12. Hypertension and diabetes: if chlortalidone is unavailable, an ACE inhibitor should be the drug of choice

Hypertension and diabetes: if chlortalidone is unavailable, an ACE inhibitor should be the drug of choice Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Hypertension and diabetes: if chlortalidone is unavailable, an ACE inhibitor should be the drug of choice'', 1 June 2017 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Hypertension and diabetes: if chlortalidone is unavailable, an ACE inhibitor should be the drug of choice Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |    (...) |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight Hypertension and diabetes: if chlortalidone is unavailable, an ACE inhibitor should be the drug of choice Hypertension treatment in diabetes patients aims to reduce the risk of complications: cardiovascular events, end-stage renal failure, deterioration of eyesight. Patients with diabetes are exposed to arterial damage, including coronary artery disease and stroke, and damage to the blood capillaries

2017 Prescrire

13. The effects of icatibant for angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor-induced angioedema

The effects of icatibant for angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor-induced angioedema Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address

2017 PROSPERO

14. Renin inhibitors versus angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors for primary hypertension [Cochrane protocol]

Renin inhibitors versus angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors for primary hypertension [Cochrane protocol] Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence

2017 PROSPERO

15. A systematic review of outcomes associated with withholding angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) prior to noncardiac surgery

A systematic review of outcomes associated with withholding angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) prior to noncardiac surgery Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email

2017 PROSPERO

17. ACE inhibitors during acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)

ACE inhibitors during acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)

2017 DynaMed Plus

18. Comparative efficacy and safety of ACE inhibitors or ARBs for early preventing diabetic kidney disease in patients with diabetes and normoalbuminuria: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Comparative efficacy and safety of ACE inhibitors or ARBs for early preventing diabetic kidney disease in patients with diabetes and normoalbuminuria: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites

2017 PROSPERO

19. Cohort study: ACE inhibitors in African Americans with hypertension associated with worse outcomes as compared to other antihypertensives

Cohort study: ACE inhibitors in African Americans with hypertension associated with worse outcomes as compared to other antihypertensives ACE inhibitors in African Americans with hypertension associated with worse outcomes as compared to other antihypertensives | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see (...) our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here ACE inhibitors in African Americans with hypertension associated with worse outcomes as compared to other antihypertensives

2016 Evidence-Based Medicine

20. The effect of Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers on improving markers of physical function in older people

The effect of Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers on improving markers of physical function in older people Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith

2016 PROSPERO