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1. Embolisation of PAVMs reported to improve nosebleeds by a subgroup of patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (PubMed)

Embolisation of PAVMs reported to improve nosebleeds by a subgroup of patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia Pulmonary AVM embolisation appears to improve nosebleed severity for nearly one in six people with HHT http://ow.ly/4mJqip.

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2016 ERJ open research

2. Interventions for recurrent idiopathic epistaxis (nosebleeds) in children. (PubMed)

Interventions for recurrent idiopathic epistaxis (nosebleeds) in children. Recurrent idiopathic epistaxis (nosebleeds) in children is repeated nasal bleeding in patients up to the age of 16 for which no specific cause has been identified. Although nosebleeds are very common in children, and most cases are self limiting or settle with simple measures (such as pinching the nose), more severe recurrent cases can require treatment from a healthcare professional. However, there is no consensus

2012 Cochrane

3. Mycobacterium gordonae in Patient with Facial Ulcers, Nosebleeds, and Positive T-SPOT.TB Test, China. (PubMed)

Mycobacterium gordonae in Patient with Facial Ulcers, Nosebleeds, and Positive T-SPOT.TB Test, China. Mycobacterium gordonae is often regarded as a weak pathogen that only occasionally causes overt disease. We report a case of M. gordonae infection in the facial skin, nasal mucosa, and paranasal sinus in an immunocompetent patient and review previous cases. The T-SPOT.TB test might be useful in diagnosing such cases.

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2017 Emerging Infectious Diseases

4. 7-day weighed food diaries suggest patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia may spontaneously modify their diet to avoid nosebleed precipitants (PubMed)

7-day weighed food diaries suggest patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia may spontaneously modify their diet to avoid nosebleed precipitants Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) poses substantial burdens due to nosebleeds and iron deficiency resulting from recurrent hemorrhagic iron losses. Recent studies by our group found surprising links between HHT nosebleeds and certain food groups. In this letter, we report 7-day weighed food diary assessments of an unselected group (...) of 25 UK patients with HHT whose nosebleeds ranged from mild to severe (median epistaxis severity score 4.66, range 0.89- 9.11). The diaries provide evidence that food items most commonly reported to provoke nosebleeds were ingested by fewer HHT patients, compared to food items less commonly reported to provoke nosebleeds (chi-squared p <0.001).

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2017 Orphanet journal of rare diseases

5. Dietary supplement use and nosebleeds in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia — an observational study (PubMed)

Dietary supplement use and nosebleeds in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia — an observational study Understanding potential provocations of haemorrhage is important in a range of clinical settings, and particularly for people with abnormal vasculature. Patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) can report haemorrhage from nasal telangiectasia in real time, and suggested dietary factors may precipitate nosebleeds. To examine further, nosebleed severity, dietary supplement (...) use, and blood indices were evaluated in an unselected group of 50 HHT patients recruited from a specialist UK service. Using the validated Epistaxis Severity Score, nosebleed severity ranged from 0 to 9.1 out of 10 (median 3.9). Using a Food Frequency Questionnaire, 24/50 (48%) participants reported use of dietary supplements in the previous year. A third (18/50; 36%) had used self prescribed, non-iron containing dietary supplements, ingesting between 1 and 3 different supplements each day. Eight

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2016 Intractable & rare diseases research

6. 'How to stop a nosebleed': an assessment of the quality of epistaxis treatment advice on YouTube. (PubMed)

'How to stop a nosebleed': an assessment of the quality of epistaxis treatment advice on YouTube. Video hosting websites are increasingly being used to disseminate health education messages. This study aimed to assess the quality of advice contained within YouTube videos on the conservative management of epistaxis.YouTube.com was searched using the phrase 'how to stop a nosebleed'. The first 50 videos were screened. Objective advice scores and subjective production quality scores were

2016 Journal of Laryngology & Otology

7. Epistaxis (nosebleeds)

Epistaxis (nosebleeds) Epistaxis (nosebleeds) - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Epistaxis (nosebleeds): Summary Epistaxis is bleeding from the nose, caused by damage to the blood vessels of the nasal mucosa. Most epistaxis is self-limiting and harmless, and often the cause of damage to the blood vessels is not identified. Local causes of damage to the blood vessels include trauma, inflammation, topical drugs (such as corticosteroids), surgery, vascular causes (such as hereditary (...) quality standards NICE quality standards No NICE quality standards were found during the review of this topic. Background information Background information Definition What is it? Epistaxis is bleeding from the nose. In most cases (80–95%), epistaxis originates from Little's area on the anterior nasal septum, which contains the Kiesselbach plexus of vessels. Less commonly, epistaxis originates from branches of the sphenopalatine artery in the posterior nasal cavity. Posterior nosebleeds usually occur

2015 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

8. Lifestyle and Dietary Influences on Nosebleed Severity in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia. (PubMed)

Lifestyle and Dietary Influences on Nosebleed Severity in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia. To identify factors influencing the severity of epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT).Participants with and without HHT were recruited from a specialist service and online following advertisement by the HHT Foundation International. Both groups were asked to complete a nonbiased questionnaire.The reported effects of specific treatments or lifestyle factors on epistaxis were (...) to exacerbate epistaxis were also found to be high in salicylates (including red wine, spices, chocolate, coffee, and certain fruits), natural antiplatelet activity (garlic, ginger, ginseng, ginkgo biloba, and vitamin E15), or omega-3 acids (oily fish, salmon).This study supports existing treatments and suggests lifestyle and dietary maneuvers that may also improve nosebleeds in HHT.2c.Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

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2013 Laryngoscope

9. Ranibizumab for the Management of Recurrent Nosebleeds in Patients With Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT)

Ranibizumab for the Management of Recurrent Nosebleeds in Patients With Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) Ranibizumab for the Management of Recurrent Nosebleeds in Patients With Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number (...) of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Ranibizumab for the Management of Recurrent Nosebleeds in Patients With Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01406639 Recruitment Status : Withdrawn (Study withdrawn due

2011 Clinical Trials

10. Posterior Sinus Approach for Nosebleeds (PubMed)

Posterior Sinus Approach for Nosebleeds 18730815 2010 06 28 2018 11 13 0008-1264 117 3 1972 Sep California medicine Calif Med Posterior sinus approach for nosebleeds. 72-3 Butler R M RM eng Journal Article United States Calif Med 0410260 0008-1264 1972 9 1 0 0 1972 9 1 0 1 1972 9 1 0 0 ppublish 18730815 PMC1518516 Laryngoscope. 1965 Jul;75:1151-9 14344526 Arch Otolaryngol. 1971 Dec;94(6):516-24 5129223

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1972 California Medicine

11. Iron Deficiency – Diagnosis and Management

: Increased requirements due to growth, low socioeconomic status, lack of balanced diet, (including ethnic groups with low iron high fibre/phytates diet e.g. Asians), celiac disease, bleeding from any source, e.g. frequent nosebleeds, GI diseases including short gut syndrome, cow’s milk protein colitis Infants < 6 months: maternal iron deficiency, prematurity/low birth weight (low blood volume at birth, phlebotomy), feeding inappropriate milk substitutes other than breastmilk or commercial infant formula

2019 Clinical Practice Guidelines and Protocols in British Columbia

12. Tranexamic acid for patients with nasal haemorrhage (epistaxis). (PubMed)

Tranexamic acid for patients with nasal haemorrhage (epistaxis). Epistaxis (nosebleed) most commonly affects children and the elderly. The majority of episodes are managed at home with simple measures. In more severe cases medical intervention is required to either cauterise the bleeding vessel, or to pack the nose with various materials. Tranexamic acid is used in a number of clinical settings to stop bleeding by preventing clot breakdown (fibrinolysis). It may have a role in the management

2018 Cochrane

13. Epistaxis

inflammation or hyperaemia, such as allergy, viral rhinitis, bacterial rhinosinusitis, dust, or chemicals. Although rare, neoplasm may also cause nosebleed. Topical anaesthesia and vasoconstriction are essential for initial treatment of active bleeding. If initial measures fail, almost all episodes may be controlled with anterior or anterior-posterior packing techniques. Bleeding may be refractory in the presence of coagulopathy. Definition Epistaxis, or nosebleed, is bleeding from the nasal cavity

2018 BMJ Best Practice

15. Statin Safety and Associated Adverse Events: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

Without Significant CK Elevations Drugs that have rare but serious adverse effects typically also have less serious adverse effects of the same type that occur more commonly. For example, anticoagulant drugs occasionally cause major intracranial or gastrointestinal hemorrhage but much more commonly cause bruises, nosebleeds, or bleeding gums. Many patients report adverse events during statin therapy, most commonly muscle symptoms (muscle pain or weakness), and some find the symptoms intolerable

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2019 American Gastroenterological Association Institute

16. Ointments versus Nasal Packing and Cautery for the Management of Recurrent Epistaxis: Comparative Clinical Effectiveness

? What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of ointment, cautery, or nasal packing for the management and prevention of recurrent epistaxis? Key Message Two systematic reviews, one randomized controlled trial, and one evidence-based guideline were identified regarding the management of recurrent epistaxis. Tags blood, cautery, epistaxis, nose, ointments, salve, balm, petroleum jelly, bacteriostatic cream, nosebleed, nasal packing, cauterize Files Rapid Response Summary of Abstracts

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

17. Vasoconstricting Sprays with Direct Compression versus Direct Compression for Acute Anterior Epistaxis: Comparative Clinical Effectiveness

vasoconstricting sprays prior to direct compression for management of acute anterior epistaxis? Key Message No relevant literature was identified regarding vasoconstricting sprays with direct compression versus direct compression for acute anterior epistaxis. Tags epistaxis, nasal decongestants, nasal sprays, oxymetazoline, vasoconstriction, vasoconstrictor agents, cardiovascular, ear, nose, and throat, medical devices, nasal, intranasal, nosebleed, nose bleed, nasal spray, nasal sprays Files Rapid Response

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

18. Bruising

as a cause of abnormal bruising. Assessment of a person with bruising involves: Asking about symptoms suggesting an underlying platelet or coagulation disorder, such as nosebleeds or menorrhagia. Asking about possible underlying medical causes. Asking about alcohol and drugs. Asking about a family history of a known bleeding disorder, or a tendency to bruise or bleed easily or spontaneously. Assessing the location and pattern of bruising in the context of the person's age, mobility and developmental (...) as bruising on exposed areas (such as the arms or legs) after minor trauma. May be associated with menorrhagia. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) A rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder which leads to mucocutaneous telangiectasia of the skin, mucous membranes, and organs. There may be a positive family history, recurrent nosebleeds, fatigue, nail changes, and hair loss. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome This causes joint hypermobility and skin translucency and hyperextensibility. It may present

2017 Prodigy

19. Antiocoagulation - oral

. This includes bruising, bleeding gums, nosebleeds, prolonged bleeding from cuts, blood in the urine or stools, haemoptysis, subconjunctival haemorrhage, and vaginal bleeding in a postmenopausal woman. To seek medical advice if they get sudden severe back pain (which may indicate spontaneous retroperitoneal bleeding). Not to take over-the-counter medicines such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. What to do if there has been a missed dose or if a double dose has been taken. The duration of treatment (...) , bleeding gums, nosebleeds, prolonged bleeding from cuts, blood in the urine or stools, coughing up blood, a subconjunctival haemorrhage, and vaginal bleeding in a postmenopausal woman. They get sudden severe back pain (which may indicate spontaneous retroperitoneal bleeding). About which can affect the plasma levels of apixaban. Also explain that they should not take over-the-counter medicines such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. What to do if there has been a (e.g. a missed dose

2017 Prodigy

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