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161. Public Health Emergency Planning for Children in Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) Disasters Full Text available with Trip Pro

Public Health Emergency Planning for Children in Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) Disasters Children represent nearly a quarter of the US population, but their unique needs in chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) emergencies may not be well understood by public health and emergency management personnel or even clinicians. Children are different from adults physically, developmentally, and socially. These characteristics have implications for providing (...) care in CBRN disasters, making resulting illness in children challenging to prevent, identify, and treat. This article discusses these distinct physical, developmental, and social traits and characteristics of children in the context of the science behind exposure to, health effects from, and treatment for the threat agents potentially present in CBRN incidents.

2014 Biosecurity and bioterrorism : biodefense strategy, practice, and science

162. Leveraging public health nurses for disaster risk communication in Fukushima City: a qualitative analysis of nurses' written records of parenting counseling and peer discussions. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Leveraging public health nurses for disaster risk communication in Fukushima City: a qualitative analysis of nurses' written records of parenting counseling and peer discussions. Local public health nurses (PHNs) have been recognized as the main health service providers in communities in Japan. The Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011 has, however, created a major challenge for them in responding to mothers' concerns. This was in part due to difficulties in assessing, understanding (...) and communicating health risks on low-dose radiation exposure. In order to guide the development of risk communication plans, this study sought to investigate mothers' primary concerns and possible solutions perceived by a core healthcare profession like the PHNs.A total of 150 records from parenting counseling sessions conducted between PHNs and mothers who have attended mandatory 18-month health checkups for their children at the Fukushima City Health and Welfare Center in 2010, 2011 (year of disaster

2014 BMC Health Services Research

163. Nurses' experiences of ethical preparedness for public health emergencies and healthcare disasters: a systematic review of qualitative evidence. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Nurses' experiences of ethical preparedness for public health emergencies and healthcare disasters: a systematic review of qualitative evidence. Little is known about nurses' direct experiences of ethical preparedness for dealing with catastrophic public health emergencies and healthcare disasters or the ethical quandaries that may arise during such events. A systematic literature review was undertaken to explore and synthesize qualitative research literature reporting nurses' direct (...) experiences of being prepared for and managing the ethical challenges posed by catastrophic public health emergencies and healthcare disasters. Twenty-six research studies were retrieved for detailed examination and assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological validity prior to inclusion in the review. Of these, 12 studies published between 1973 and 2011 were deemed to meet the inclusion criteria and were critically appraised. The review confirmed there is a significant gap in the literature

2014 Nursing & health sciences

164. Preparedness Emergency Response Research Centers (PERRCs): Addressing Public Health Preparedness Knowledge Gaps Using a Public Health Systems Perspective Full Text available with Trip Pro

Leinhos is with the Office of Applied Research, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA. eng U36 OE000002 OE OSELS CDC HHS United States Journal Article United States Am J Public Health 1254074 0090-0036 2018 11 14 6 0 2018 11 14 6 0 2018 11 14 6 0 ppublish 30422694 10.2105/AJPH.2018.304812 PMC6236718 Public Health Rep. 2014;129 Suppl 4:8-18 25355970 Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2017 Oct;11(5):552-561 28330513 Am J Public Health. 2017 Sep;107(S2):e1-e6 28892437 BMC Public (...) Preparedness Emergency Response Research Centers (PERRCs): Addressing Public Health Preparedness Knowledge Gaps Using a Public Health Systems Perspective 30422694 2018 12 07 1541-0048 108 S5 2018 Nov American journal of public health Am J Public Health Preparedness Emergency Response Research Centers (PERRCs): Addressing Public Health Preparedness Knowledge Gaps Using a Public Health Systems Perspective. S363-S365 10.2105/AJPH.2018.304812 Savoia Elena E Elena Savoia, Dorothy Pordon Bernard

2018 American Journal of Public Health

165. How to make sure your vacation isn’t a medical disaster

to peanuts has increased they are still served on some flights. Other commonly served food products include soy and wheat. Know the health care system of the destination you are traveling to. Have your health insurance information with you and consider additional travel insurance if you are traveling out of the country or to remote destinations. In the event you are too ill to travel in a general economy through an airport, there are medical evacuation services (e.g., helicopters, fixed-wing aircraft (...) How to make sure your vacation isn’t a medical disaster How to make sure your vacation isn't a medical disaster How to make sure your vacation isn’t a medical disaster | | June 8, 2018 90 Shares Recently while traveling overseas, I found myself in a predicament not often encountered nor taught to health professionals. I was requested to address an emergency at 30,000 feet in the air. This got us thinking: How many patients consider the possibility of a medical emergency in the air? People

2018 KevinMD blog

166. Predicting community resilience and recovery after a disaster

Updates To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address: Enter Email Address Submit Button Predicting Community Resilience and Recovery After a Disaster Posted on August 7, 2017 by Jon Links, Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health After 9/11, I was asked by the Baltimore City Health Commissioner to help prepare the city for a radiation terrorism event, because my entire career up until that point had been in radiation-based medical imaging. I didn’t know anything (...) about public health preparedness at the time, but I found it very fulfilling to work with the city health department and other first responders, especially fire and police. Public health preparedness science and research is more than multi-disciplinary, it’s trans-disciplinary, which is what makes it fun. Connecting behavioral and social science The has a particular interest in the mental and behavioral health challenges that people, organizations, and jurisdictions face during and after disasters

2017 CDC Public Health Matters

167. Jeni Miller: Hurricanes Harvey and Irma are not so natural disasters

. And if these storms were purely acts of nature, that might be the best we could do. But we know that policy decisions vastly increased the human impact of these storms. And at the Global Climate and Health Alliance, we know that doctors, nurses, public health professionals, and our organizations can make a critical difference in guiding policy. Even as we manage the aftermath of the current storms, we must be pushing for evidence-based policies to address the human-caused climate change making storms fiercer (...) Jeni Miller: Hurricanes Harvey and Irma are not so natural disasters Jeni Miller: Hurricanes Harvey and Irma are not so natural disasters - The BMJ ---> Human decisions are ramping up the intensity and frequency of such storms and making their consequences worse On 25 August I started texting my sister and her husband every few hours. As I watched the news, Hurricane Harvey was headed right toward them in Houston. Less than two weeks later, Hurricane Irma was flattening Caribbean islands

2017 The BMJ Blog

168. We need better evidence in humanitarian disasters: here’s why

interventions in preventing or reducing the severity of psychological problems post trauma. Not all interventions are therefore as effective as we’d like to think. Second, there is a clear need to speed up the publication of research and provide better access to data in public health emergencies. In 2015, we published A World Health organisation consultation on . The Ebola outbreak showed there were problems with rapidly sharing data and results to identify the causative agent, predict spread, define (...) as essential the sharing of evidence produced and lessons learnt. The Lancet also recently called for the improvement of evidence for health in humanitarian crises, citing an estimated 172 million people are currently affected by armed conflict. Optimising evidence for ; will require a paradigm shift in decision making in humanitarian disasters and public health emergencies Spending on humanitarian aid is at record levels, In the last ten years, nearly 1.6 billion people worldwide were affected

2017 Evidence-Based Medicine blog

169. Sae Ochi: Lessons learned from the Japanese triple disaster—advice for primary healthcare workers

vulnerability to natural hazards. After the 2015 earthquake in Nepal, the high death toll was attributed to a disconnect between disaster management policy and responses. [1] In Yemen, severe food insecurity and poor sanitation has led to the current cholera outbreak. [2] In such situations where disaster preparedness at a national level is no longer evident, it is primary health care services (PHC) that have to maintain people’s health at local levels. With an increased burden of non-communicable diseases (...) to life-saving services” —in this era of political instability, the local PHC might be the only service that provides care for such people, and thus be the last defence of disaster risk reduction for health. [12] Sae Ochi is a lecturer, department of Laboratory Medicine, Jikei University School of Medicine Adjunct MD at Department of Internal Medicine, Soma Central Hospital. She is a physician and public health researcher who was engaged in recovery activity in Soma City, Fukushima after the nuclear

2017 The BMJ Blog

170. The dismantling of informed consent is a disaster

informed consent, the descent of health care into amorality is inevitable, and the doctor-patient relationship is doomed to ruination, oblivion, and despair. It is also important to acknowledge the fact that a lack of informed consent has become endemic to our health care system. This betrayal of patient trust is inextricably linked to three violations: a rape of the body, a rape of the mind and a rape of the soul. The rape of the mind is anchored in a willful nondisclosure of common long-term side (...) The dismantling of informed consent is a disaster The dismantling of informed consent is a disaster The dismantling of informed consent is a disaster | | September 26, 2018 42 Shares Informed consent is the cornerstone of medical ethics. And every physician must defend this sacred principle from every form of evil that would seek to dismantle, degrade and debase it. If informed consent is the sun, then privacy, confidentiality, dignity, and trust are planets that go around it. For without

2018 KevinMD blog

171. Investment for health and well-being: a review of the social return on investment from public health policies to support implementing the Sustainable Development Goals by building on Health 2020

Besnier Charlotte N.B. Grey | Kathryn Ashton | Anna Schwappach | Christine ClarThe Health Evidence Network HEN – the Health Evidence Network – is an information service for public health decision-makers in the WHO European Region, in action since 2003 and initiated and coordinated by the WHO Regional Office for Europe under the umbrella of the European Health Information Initiative (a multipartner network coordinating all health information activities in the WHO European Region). HEN supports public (...) to greater air pollution from road travel than those in rural areas (60), whereas rural areas may lack basic facilities and/or easy access to health care. In some areas, such as the Caucasus and central Asia, 62% of the rural population live in homes without access to piped water, compared with only 9% of the urban population (96). Environmental determinants interact with gender and social determinants and have a different impact on men and women (131). 2.1.2. Public health policies which bring SROI

2017 WHO Health Evidence Network

172. Identifying and Addressing the Public Health Risks of Splash Parks

Identifying and Addressing the Public Health Risks of Splash Parks IDENTIFYING AND ADDRESSING THE PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS OF SPLASH PARKS KEY MESSAGES • Recirculating splash parks have caused several large gastrointestinal outbreaks in recent years. • Outbreaks are typically linked to failure of the chlorination/ filtration systems and/or lack of secondary disinfection, such as ultraviolet light, but may also derive from user behaviour as well as design and operating conditions. • This document (...) . 1,2 Splash parks may take one of two basic designs, which influences the associated public health risks. Non-recirculating or flow-through parks discharge the water directly to waste and present a relatively low risk to their users as the design is based on using fresh potable water (Figure 1a). In contrast, recirculating parks collect water in an underground tank, apply some form of water treatment, and re-use the water again (Figure 1b). This presents an increased risk of contamination

2017 National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health

173. Natural Disasters, Armed Conflict, and Public Health

Natural Disasters, Armed Conflict, and Public Health Rotation Prep | NEJM Resident 360 Social Login Email Login Log in via Email Create Your Account We will not share your email with anyone. Password must be at least 8 characters. Show or Hide the password you are typing. Request to Join has invited you to join this group Your browser does not support video tags Welcome! NEJM Resident 360 helps you prepare for your next rotation quickly and efficiently, provides support for coping

2013 Now@NEJM

174. Asylum seekers in Belgium: options for a more equitable access to health care. A stakeholder consultation

patient confidentiality 43 5.2.8 Lack of appropriate health information for asylum seekers 43 5.3 PROBLEMS AT THE MICRO-LEVEL 43 5.3.1 Inequity in access 43 5.3.2 Inequity in treatment 45 5.3.3 Inequity in outcomes 46 5.4 SPECIFIC PROBLEMS FOR HEALTH CARE WITH UNACCOMPANIED MINORS 47 5.4.1 Lack of coverage through insurance funds for unaccompanied minors 47 5.4.2 Difficulties to comply with the conditions to access the compulsory health insurance 47 5.4.3 Shortage of guardians 47 KCE Report 319 Asylum (...) , including asylum seekers, through the integration in the compulsory national health insurance scheme. c Equitable access to health care should allow the Belgian state to better cope with national and international obligations regarding human rights, right to health and public health protection. 10-18 c The argument to limit the so-called parallel health insurance systems was also highlighted for prisoners and their (re)integration in the sickness and disability insurance has been suggested. See KCE

2019 Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre

175. Increasing the provision of mental health care for vulnerable, disaster-affected people in Bangladesh. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Increasing the provision of mental health care for vulnerable, disaster-affected people in Bangladesh. Bangladesh has the highest natural disaster mortality rate in the world, with over half a million people lost to disaster events since 1970. Most of these people have died during floods or cyclones, both of which are likely to become more frequent due to global climate change. To date, the government's post-disaster response strategy has focused, increasingly effectively, on the physical needs (...) of survivors, through the provision of shelter, food and medical care. However, the serious and widespread mental health consequences of natural disasters in Bangladesh have not yet received the attention that they deserve. This Debate article proposes a practical model that will facilitate the provision of comprehensive and effective post-disaster mental health services for vulnerable Bangladeshis on a sustainable basis.A series of socially determined factors render the women and the poor of Bangladesh

2014 BMC Public Health

176. Building Community Disaster Resilience: Perspectives From a Large Urban County Department of Public Health. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Building Community Disaster Resilience: Perspectives From a Large Urban County Department of Public Health. An emerging approach to public health emergency preparedness and response, community resilience encompasses individual preparedness as well as establishing a supportive social context in communities to withstand and recover from disasters. We examine why building community resilience has become a key component of national policy across multiple federal agencies and discuss the core (...) principles embodied in community resilience theory-specifically, the focus on incorporating equity and social justice considerations in preparedness planning and response. We also examine the challenges of integrating community resilience with traditional public health practices and the importance of developing metrics for evaluation and strategic planning purposes. Using the example of the Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project, we discuss our experience and perspective from a large

2013 American Journal of Public Health

177. Mental Health Triage Tools for Medically Cleared Disaster Survivors: An Evaluation by MRC Volunteers and Public Health Workers. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Mental Health Triage Tools for Medically Cleared Disaster Survivors: An Evaluation by MRC Volunteers and Public Health Workers. Psychological assessment after disasters determines which survivors are acutely distressed or medically compromised and what kind of assistance is needed (whether practical or psychological). A mental health triage tool can help direct more people to the appropriate type of help. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the Fast Mental Health (...) Triage Tool (FMHT) and the Alsept-Price Mental Health Scale (APMHS) among public health workers and Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) volunteers in conducting mental health triage. Both tools screen for ability to follow simple commands, chronic medical conditions, mental health conditions and services, occult injuries, and traumatic events in the past year. Both were designed for use in disasters where mental health resources are scarce and survivors are already medically triaged.Volunteers (n = 204

2013 Disaster medicine and public health preparedness Controlled trial quality: uncertain

178. The US emergency care system: meeting everyday acute care needs while being ready for disasters. Full Text available with Trip Pro

The US emergency care system: meeting everyday acute care needs while being ready for disasters. The emergency care system is an essential part of the US health care system. In addition to providing acute resuscitation and life- and limb-saving care, the emergency care system provides considerable support to physicians outside the emergency department and serves as an important safety-net provider. In times of disaster, the emergency care system must be able to surge rapidly to accommodate (...) a massive influx of patients, sometimes with little or no notice. Extreme daily demands on the system can promote innovations and adaptations that are invaluable in responding to disasters. However, excessive and inappropriate utilization is wasteful and can diminish "surge capacity" when it is most needed. Certain features of the US health care system have imposed strains on the emergency care system. We explore policy issues related to moving toward an emergency care system that can more effectively

2013 Health affairs

179. Learning from Japan: strengthening US emergency care and disaster response. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Learning from Japan: strengthening US emergency care and disaster response. As Hurricane Katrina demonstrated in 2005, US health response systems for disasters-typically designed to handle only short-term mass-casualty events-are inadequately prepared for disasters that result in large-scale population displacements. Similarly, after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, Japan found that many of its disaster shelters failed to meet international standards for long-term provision of basic needs (...) and health care for the vulnerable populations that sought refuge in the shelters. Hospital disaster plans had not been tested and turned out to be inadequate, and emergency communication equipment did not function. We make policy recommendations that aim to improve US responses to mass-displacement disasters based on Japan's 2011 experience. First, response systems must provide for the extended care of large populations of chronically ill and vulnerable people. Second, policies should ensure

2013 Health affairs

180. When a natural disaster strikes, can public health respond effectively?

When a natural disaster strikes, can public health respond effectively? When a natural disaster strikes, can public health respond effectively? | | Blogs | CDC Search Form Controls TOPIC ONLY Search The CDC cancel submit Search Form Controls TOPIC ONLY Search The CDC cancel submit Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported by your browser. For this reason, some items on this page will be unavailable. For more information about this message, please visit this page: . Related to this Blog (...) About this Blog When a natural disaster strikes, can public health respond effectively? Posted on April 19, 2016 by Blog Administrator New primer shows how disaster surveillance can make all the difference. During April 25-28, 2011, a massive storm system generated 351 tornadoes that whipped through five southern states, causing 338 deaths, leaving behind historic levels of damage to people’s homes and businesses. The swarm of twisters and storms took down trees and power lines, blew roofs off

2016 CDC Your Health - Your Environment Blog

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