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61. Mental health workers perceptions of disaster response in China. (PubMed)

interviews. These recruited participants who had been involved in different types of disaster rescue across 7 provinces/cities where disasters have recently occurred. We used thematic analysis to analyze the data and relevant findings were extracted for policy recommendation.Mental health workers' perspectives were examined in detailed according to four core themes: forms of organization, intervention pathway, intervention strategy and technique, and public health information. Post-disaster MHCI should (...) Mental health workers perceptions of disaster response in China. The post-disaster mental health crisis intervention (MHCI) system in China remains immature and unsystematic. We aim to report the perceptions of a large sample of MHCI workers and government administrators and provide recommendations for developing a national mental health disaster response management plan in China.An in-depth qualitative study was conducted, collecting data from 20 focus-group discussions and 25 key stakeholder

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2019 BMC Public Health

62. A breast cancer study in mice gets big headlines, setting up potential for patient ‘disaster,’ experts say

thinking about health care interventions. And those will be still be alive on the site for a couple of years. 6093 Posts Menu April 16, 2018 A breast cancer study in mice gets big headlines, setting up potential for patient ‘disaster,’ experts say Posted By Categories , Tags , Joy Victory is Deputy Managing Editor of HealthNewsReview.org. She tweets at @thejoyvictory. “I spoke to several cancer specialists in New York City last night who said ‘caution, this is not ready for primetime.'” — ABC News (...) A breast cancer study in mice gets big headlines, setting up potential for patient ‘disaster,’ experts say Breast cancer caused by surgery--Reckless news reporting misleads Note to our followers: Our nearly 13-year run of daily publication of new content on HealthNewsReview.org came to a close at the end of 2018. Publisher Gary Schwitzer and other contributors may post new articles periodically. But all of the 6,000+ articles we have published contain lessons to help you improve your critical

2018 HealthNewsReview

63. Understanding Liability Risks and Protections for Pediatric Providers During Disasters. (PubMed)

Understanding Liability Risks and Protections for Pediatric Providers During Disasters. Although most health care providers will go through their careers without experiencing a major disaster in their local communities, if one does occur, it can be life and career altering. The American Academy of Pediatrics has been in the forefront of providing education and advocacy on the critical importance of disaster preparedness. From experiences over the past decade, new evidence and analysis have (...) broadened our understanding that the concept of preparedness is also applicable to addressing the unique professional liability risks that can occur when caring for patients and families during a disaster. Concepts explored in this technical report will help to inform pediatric health care providers, advocates, and policy makers about the complexities of how providers are currently protected, with a focus on areas of unappreciated liability. The timeliness of this technical report is emphasized

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2019 Pediatrics

64. Understanding Liability Risks and Protections for Pediatric Providers During Disasters. (PubMed)

Understanding Liability Risks and Protections for Pediatric Providers During Disasters. Although most health care providers will go through their careers without experiencing a major disaster in their local communities, if one does occur, it can be life and career altering. The American Academy of Pediatrics has been at the forefront of providing education and advocacy on the critical importance of disaster preparedness. From experiences over the past decade, new evidence and analysis have (...) broadened our understanding that the concept of preparedness is also applicable to addressing the unique professional liability risks that can occur when caring for patients and families during a disaster. In our recommendations in this policy statement, we target pediatric health care providers, advocates, and policy makers and address how individuals, institutions, and government can work together to strengthen the system of liability protections during disasters so that appropriate and timely care

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2019 Pediatrics

65. Partnerships Help Save Lives When Disaster Strikes

updates about this page, enter your email address: Enter Email Address Submit Button Partnerships Help Save Lives When Disaster Strikes Posted on November 5, 2018 by Germaine M. Vazquez, MS, Health Communication Specialist, Center for Preparedness and Response, Division of State and Local Readiness Public health emergencies occur every day across the United States. Tornadoes, hurricanes, wildfires, floods, infectious disease outbreaks, terrorist attacks, and other emergencies have all occurred within (...) and helped communities return to normal operations as quickly as possible. From natural disasters to infectious diseases, the PHEP program protects America’s health, safety, and security to save lives. Check out the PHEP to find out more about how the PHEP program has helped communities prepare for, respond to, and recover from public health emergencies. Posted on November 5, 2018 by Germaine M. Vazquez, MS, Health Communication Specialist, Center for Preparedness and Response, Division of State

2018 CDC Public Health Matters

66. Barriers and facilitators to provide continuity of care to dischargeable patients in disasters: A qualitative study. (PubMed)

'. The suggested solutions for post-discharge continuity of care were: creation of registry and follow-up system; removing pre-hospital challenges; including disaster management courses in medical school curriculum; promoting hospital preparedness by All-Hazard Approach; and effective use of available resources.Understanding the barriers to continuity of care for discharged patients for adopting policies based on experiences of health care providers can help planners to design and implement effective programs (...) Barriers and facilitators to provide continuity of care to dischargeable patients in disasters: A qualitative study. Early discharge of some in-patients is the effective measure to create hospital surge capacity in disasters. However, some of these patients may need to post-discharge continuity of care. The aim of the current study then is to explore the barriers of continuity of care, and to provide suitable solutions for potentially dischargeable patients during disasters.This qualitative

2019 Injury

67. The impact of natural disasters on medicare costs in U.S. gulf coast states. (PubMed)

with Medicare claims data to create a panel dataset from 2001 to 2007.Medicare Part A claims for the years 2001 to 2007 were merged with FEMA data related to disasters in each U.S. County. Overall Medicare costs, as well as costs for inpatient and home health care for residents of states located along the U.S. Gulf Coast (Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida) were compared to costs for residents of the rest of the U.S.Expenditures among residents of U.S. Gulf States decreased with increased (...) hazard exposure. Decreases in inpatient expenditures persisted in the years following a disaster.The use of beneficiary-level data highlights the potential for natural hazards to impact health care costs. This study demonstrates the possibility that exposure to more severe disasters may limit access to health care and therefore reduce expenditures. Additional research is needed to determine if there is a substitution of services (e.g., inpatient rehabilitation for home health) in disaster-affected

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2019 Medicine

68. Potential Impact of 2020 US Decennial Census Data Collection on Disaster Preparedness and Population Mental Health. (PubMed)

collection. Despite the utility of the information provided by the Census and American Community Survey (ACS), the 2020 US Census and subsequent ACS data face threats to validity. As a result, public health funding could be misallocated, and disaster preparedness and response efforts misinformed; this can also contribute to the worsening of mental health inequities, particularly in the context of disaster. Undercutting the Census and the ACS, rich data sources that allow representation of all people (...) Potential Impact of 2020 US Decennial Census Data Collection on Disaster Preparedness and Population Mental Health. Increasing in frequency and impact in the United States and worldwide, disasters can lead to serious mental health consequences. Although US census data are essential for disaster preparedness and the identification of community-level risk factors for adverse postdisaster mental health outcomes, the US Census Bureau faces many challenges as we approach 2020 Decennial Census data

2019 American Journal of Public Health

69. Natural Disasters, Armed Conflict, and Public Health

Natural Disasters, Armed Conflict, and Public Health Rotation Prep | NEJM Resident 360 Social Login Email Login Log in via Email Create Your Account We will not share your email with anyone. Password must be at least 8 characters. Show or Hide the password you are typing. Request to Join has invited you to join this group Your browser does not support video tags Welcome! NEJM Resident 360 helps you prepare for your next rotation quickly and efficiently, provides support for coping

2013 Now@NEJM

70. Nurses' experiences of responding to a health care disaster or adventitious crisis: a systematic review of qualitative evidence.

Nurses' experiences of responding to a health care disaster or adventitious crisis: a systematic review of qualitative evidence. 27820180 2018 05 14 1838-2142 9 64 Suppl 2011 JBI library of systematic reviews JBI Libr Syst Rev Nurses' experiences of responding to a health care disaster or adventitious crisis: a systematic review of qualitative evidence. 1-11 Danna Denise D 1Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, School of Nursing. New Orleans, LA 70112 Louisiana Center for Evidence

2017 JBI library of systematic reviews

71. Mobile mental health interventions following war and disaster (PubMed)

the potential for reach of app technology. In addition to enabling improved self-management of post-trauma problems, mobile phone interventions can also enhance delivery of face-to-face care by mental health providers and increase the effectiveness of peer helpers and mutual aid organizations. More research is needed to establish the efficacy of mhealth interventions for those affected by war and disaster. Research should also focus on the identification of active elements and core processes of change (...) Mobile mental health interventions following war and disaster Mobile technologies offer potentially critical ways of delivering mental health support to those experiencing war, ethnic conflict, and human-caused and natural disasters. Research on Internet interventions suggests that effective mobile mental health technologies can be developed, and there are early indications that they will be acceptable to war and disaster survivors, and prove capable of greatly increasing the reach of mental

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2016 mHealth

72. Sae Ochi: Lessons learned from the Japanese triple disaster—advice for primary healthcare workers

vulnerability to natural hazards. After the 2015 earthquake in Nepal, the high death toll was attributed to a disconnect between disaster management policy and responses. [1] In Yemen, severe food insecurity and poor sanitation has led to the current cholera outbreak. [2] In such situations where disaster preparedness at a national level is no longer evident, it is primary health care services (PHC) that have to maintain people’s health at local levels. With an increased burden of non-communicable diseases (...) to life-saving services” —in this era of political instability, the local PHC might be the only service that provides care for such people, and thus be the last defence of disaster risk reduction for health. [12] Sae Ochi is a lecturer, department of Laboratory Medicine, Jikei University School of Medicine Adjunct MD at Department of Internal Medicine, Soma Central Hospital. She is a physician and public health researcher who was engaged in recovery activity in Soma City, Fukushima after the nuclear

2017 The BMJ Blog

73. Jeni Miller: Hurricanes Harvey and Irma are not so natural disasters

. And if these storms were purely acts of nature, that might be the best we could do. But we know that policy decisions vastly increased the human impact of these storms. And at the Global Climate and Health Alliance, we know that doctors, nurses, public health professionals, and our organizations can make a critical difference in guiding policy. Even as we manage the aftermath of the current storms, we must be pushing for evidence-based policies to address the human-caused climate change making storms fiercer (...) Jeni Miller: Hurricanes Harvey and Irma are not so natural disasters Jeni Miller: Hurricanes Harvey and Irma are not so natural disasters - The BMJ ---> Human decisions are ramping up the intensity and frequency of such storms and making their consequences worse On 25 August I started texting my sister and her husband every few hours. As I watched the news, Hurricane Harvey was headed right toward them in Houston. Less than two weeks later, Hurricane Irma was flattening Caribbean islands

2017 The BMJ Blog

74. We need better evidence in humanitarian disasters: here’s why

interventions in preventing or reducing the severity of psychological problems post trauma. Not all interventions are therefore as effective as we’d like to think. Second, there is a clear need to speed up the publication of research and provide better access to data in public health emergencies. In 2015, we published A World Health organisation consultation on . The Ebola outbreak showed there were problems with rapidly sharing data and results to identify the causative agent, predict spread, define (...) as essential the sharing of evidence produced and lessons learnt. The Lancet also recently called for the improvement of evidence for health in humanitarian crises, citing an estimated 172 million people are currently affected by armed conflict. Optimising evidence for ; will require a paradigm shift in decision making in humanitarian disasters and public health emergencies Spending on humanitarian aid is at record levels, In the last ten years, nearly 1.6 billion people worldwide were affected

2017 Evidence-Based Medicine blog

75. Predicting community resilience and recovery after a disaster

Updates To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address: Enter Email Address Submit Button Predicting Community Resilience and Recovery After a Disaster Posted on August 7, 2017 by Jon Links, Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health After 9/11, I was asked by the Baltimore City Health Commissioner to help prepare the city for a radiation terrorism event, because my entire career up until that point had been in radiation-based medical imaging. I didn’t know anything (...) about public health preparedness at the time, but I found it very fulfilling to work with the city health department and other first responders, especially fire and police. Public health preparedness science and research is more than multi-disciplinary, it’s trans-disciplinary, which is what makes it fun. Connecting behavioral and social science The has a particular interest in the mental and behavioral health challenges that people, organizations, and jurisdictions face during and after disasters

2017 CDC Public Health Matters

76. Assessing the Mental Health Impact of the 2011 Great Japan Earthquake, Tsunami, and Radiation Disaster on Elementary and Middle School Children in the Fukushima Prefecture of Japan. (PubMed)

those children who were native to Koriyama (p < .05) as well as a control group that lived outside of the Fukushima prefecture (p < .01). Using a multivariate regression, we also found that younger age and parental trauma were significantly correlated with higher SDQ scores (p < .001), while gender, displacement from one's home, and exposure to violence were not.These results suggest that, among children affected by natural disasters, younger children and those with parents suffering from trauma (...) Assessing the Mental Health Impact of the 2011 Great Japan Earthquake, Tsunami, and Radiation Disaster on Elementary and Middle School Children in the Fukushima Prefecture of Japan. On March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake occurred off of Japan's Pacific coast, which was followed by huge tsunamis that destroyed many coastal cities in the area. Due to the earthquake and subsequent tsunami, malfunctions occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi (Fukushima I) nuclear power plant, resulting

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2017 PLoS ONE

77. Ethical Issues in Technological Disaster: A Systematic Review of Literature (PubMed)

to Jan 1, 2018). From 64articles were eligible for investigation of ethical issues in Natural disaster, 6 was related to Technological Disaster. The articles were in English language.Our result show that there are seven articles discussing ethical issues during Technological disaster. All of them are related to nuclear crisis in Fukushima resulting from Japan tsunami 2011. These articles discussed mainly three ethical issues in providing medical care to victims of Technological Disasters as follow: 1 (...) Ethical Issues in Technological Disaster: A Systematic Review of Literature Industrialization could bring risk of Technological Disaster (TD) such as happened in Chernobyl, Bhopal and Fukushima crisis. Little has been discussed about its related ethical issues. In this study, we aimed to investigate ethical issues have been stated for technological disasters.A systematic search was conducted on the main international literature databases including Pubmed, Embase, Scopus and ISI (Jan 1, 2000

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2018 Archives of bone and joint surgery

78. Decision Analysis of Disturbance Management in the Process of Medical Supplies Transportation after Natural Disasters (PubMed)

Decision Analysis of Disturbance Management in the Process of Medical Supplies Transportation after Natural Disasters Public health emergencies, such as casualties and epidemic spread caused by natural disasters, have become important factors that seriously affect social development. Special medical supplies, such as blood and vaccines, are important public health medical resources, and the cold-chain distribution of medical supplies is in a highly unstable environment after a natural disaster (...) that is easily affected by disturbance events. This paper innovatively studies the distribution optimization of medical supplies after natural disasters from the perspective of disturbance management. A disturbance management model for medical supplies distribution is established from two dimensions: time and cost. In addition, a hybrid genetic algorithm is introduced to solve the model. Disturbance recovery schemes with different weight coefficients are obtained through the actual numerical experiments

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2018 International journal of environmental research and public health

79. Knowing What We Know – Reflections on the Development of Technical Guidance for Loss Data for the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (PubMed)

raised during a workshop held on developing loss data that was hosted by the United Nations Office of Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR), the Integrated Research on Disaster Risk (IRDR) programme, and Public Health England (PHE) from February 15-17 2017 at the Royal Society in London, United Kingdom. The meeting's purpose was to refine technical guidance notes concerning Global Targets A, B, C, and D, which had been drafted in coordination with the work of the OIEWG. The workshop was attended (...) Knowing What We Know – Reflections on the Development of Technical Guidance for Loss Data for the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction To report on activities aligned with the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030, national governments will use the Sendai Monitor platform to track progress using a series of indicators that inform seven Global Targets originally agreed in 2015. In February 2017, the UN General Assembly adopted a set of 38 agreed indicators based

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2018 PLoS currents

80. Health and Wellness in Healthcare Providers Post-disaster

Providers Post-disaster The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03722368 Recruitment Status : Recruiting First Posted : October 26, 2018 Last Update Posted : October 26, 2018 See Sponsor: University of Illinois (...) Description: Health care and social service providers from disaster-affected communities are at heightened risk for emotional distress symptoms immediately after the event and over the longer-term recovery period. They provide care to others both physically and emotionally, while at the same time are often in the process of recovery and rebuilding their own lives. Health care providers, particularly those who work in safety net health centers, often serve high-need communities where incomes are lower

2018 Clinical Trials

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